BC First Nation to present oral evidence about Trans Mountain expansion impact

first_imgThe Canadian Press NANAIMO, B.C. — The Tsleil-Waututh Nation will be presenting Indigenous oral traditional evidence to the National Energy Board at a hearing in Nanaimo, B.C. A news release says the board is hearing new evidence about the environmental effects of Trans Mountain pipeline expansion including adverse effects of shipping to species at risk such as southern resident killer whales.The oral traditional evidence will focus on potential impacts the project would pose to the Tsleil-Waututh culture and way of life, including their cultural relationships with whales, and how the expansion, if approved, would violate Tsleil-Waututh laws.  The Tsleil-Waututh will also file scientific expert reports with the board as evidence regarding potential impacts from shipping.Chief Maureen Thomas says the expansion violates the First Nation’s laws and poses serious and harmful impacts to Tsleil-Waututh people and culture, as well to as their lands, waters, resources, and way of life.The new hearings are being held after the Federal Court of Appeal quashed the original approval for the expansion, saying the federal government didn’t adequately consult with First Nations or consider the impact of tanker traffic on the marine environment.last_img read more

Life circumstances change So should your will estate experts say

first_imgCALGARY – Estate planning expert Lynne Butler loves to tell the cautionary tale of a widow in her 80s who had six children and six real estate properties.When it came time for her to make her final wishes known, she sat at her desk and hand-wrote a will that bequeathed her home to the child who lived with her and cared for her, and carefully doled out the other parcels of mainly rural land to each of her other five grown children.What she didn’t account for was something called capital gains tax — all of the properties had gained in value over the decades and all except her principal residence (which is exempt) owed thousands of dollars in taxes. There wasn’t nearly enough cash in the estate to pay the tax bill.“Normally, (the heirs) can’t inherit the property until the tax is paid, so what actually ends up happening is that one or more of the properties gets sold to pay the tax. So someone ends up not getting their property,” said Butler.“And that’s where the fight begins, right? Whose property are you going to sell?”The widow’s dilemma is all too typical of the drama that can split families apart when poorly written or out-of-date wills legally bind the hands of an executor who has to figure out how to make the deceased’s final wishes a reality.Butler said the widow was lucky to have sought advice from an expert before it was too late.She bought life insurance — at a very high price because of her age — to provide the funds the estate would need to pay off its tax bill.Everyone should review their will every five to seven years or after every substantial life event, says Henry Villanueva, counsel for MacMillan Estate Planning in Calgary.Those life events include birth or adoption of a child or grandchild, marriage, recovery of an inheritance, children moving out of the home and loans to relatives to buy a house or pay for education, as well as death, divorce and remarriage.“When we pass — and we will pass — all of our assets are deemed to be disposed upon death, and along with this deemed disposition is an assessment for tax on the gain on assets at the point of death, to the exclusion of assets that are rolled over from spouse to spouse … or assets that automatically flow over, as when spouses jointly own property,” Villanueva said.Butler said many people draft wills when they get married and have children because they want to ensure their spouse inherits their goods and that their children, if both parents die, are sent to a chosen guardian. Many people use do-it-yourself will kits because their wishes and assets are simple.Decades later, however, the kids are out on their own and the family fortune has grown to include a home, retirement funds, bank accounts, part ownership of a vacation condo, stocks and bonds and multiple vehicles.“A lot of people make their wills when they’re married and start having kids. Then one day they realize, ‘Well, now I’ve got grandkids.’ So it’s time to update. All their kids are over 18, they don’t need guardianships any more,” Butler said.In all Canadian provinces except B.C., Alberta, Quebec and Saskatchewan, getting married revokes previous wills, which means a new will must be signed.New wills should contain a clause revoking all previous wills. Minor adjustments to a will can be made via a “codicil” or addition, although Butler said that isn’t done very often anymore.Changed circumstances could also mean changing your executor, noted Villanueva.A close relative who was able 20 or 30 years ago to handle the crucial executor duties of listing assets and liabilities, then paying the bills and distributing the remaining assets to heirs, may not have the financial acumen to do the same now with a more complicated portfolio.The original executor may now be elderly or infirm or may have moved out of province.Butler said she’s a big fan of hiring a trust company to act as executor, especially if the estate is complicated. She said a professional executor has the knowledge to shepherd the process through efficiently without any emotional baggage.The trust company’s fees will be extracted from the estate, she said, but are usually set at the same rate or lower than what a court might authorize to be paid for any executor, including a close relative, in recognition of the work involved.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitterlast_img read more

A Baseballs Exit Velocity Is Five Parts Hitter One Part Pitcher

For years sabermetrics has theorized that pitchers can’t control what happens after a batter strikes a ball. Whether it bloops in for a hit, rockets its way to an outfielder’s glove or lands just inches outside the foul line, it’s a consequence of the batter and the defense, but not the pitcher. That argument is what led to Fielding Independent Pitching (FIP), a statistic that attempts to quantify a pitcher’s performance only for the events for which we know the pitcher has definite responsibility (walks, strikeouts and home runs — in sabermetrics parlance, the “Three True Outcomes”). FIP throws out base hits completely on the basis that they are partially a product of the defense.But now we have Statcast. The new technology that collects data on the position and velocity of the ball and the players on the field is beginning to change what we know (or thought we knew) about all sorts of things — pitching included. And that’s raising new questions about how much effect a pitcher can have on a ball once it’s put in play. The answer might be: a lot.But first, let’s talk batters. Last week, I used Statcast to show that harder-struck pitches tend to fall for hits more often. That, generally, makes hard contact good for the hitter and bad for the pitcher. Obviously, some hitters are better at hitting the ball hard. What Statcast tells us is that some pitchers are better at making batters hit the ball softly.That’s not to say pitchers hold the upper hand. In my models1Specifically, I used a linear random effects model with the R package lme4. The model was specified as follows:Batted ball velocity ~ (1|hitter) + (1|pitcher) + (1|ballpark).In total, batter explains 3 percent of the variance in batted ball velocity, while pitcher explains 0.6 percent and park 0.03 percent. of batted ball velocity that incorporate the pitcher, batter and ballpark, the batter’s effect dominates the pitcher’s. A ball’s exit velocity after a bat strikes it is about five times more the batter’s doing than the pitcher’s. This fact seems to partially vindicate FIP — batters really are the ones in control.At the same time, the pitcher’s effect is not negligible.2Deriving a p-value in a random effects model is tricky. However, the random effect for pitchers significantly improves the model by AIC, improves out-of-sample prediction accuracy, and is larger than expected under a null distribution derived from permutations. While the best batters increase batted ball velocity by as much as 7-8 mph, the best pitchers suppress it by 1.5 mph compared with the average pitcher.That has real significance: Such a decrease roughly equates to a 13-point decrease in batting average on balls in play (BABIP) for a given batted ball.3This number comes from a logistic regression of exit velocity for each batted ball. Over the course of a game, the pitchers who can best decrease exit velocity save about a quarter of a run (on average). A quarter of a run doesn’t sound like much? Multiplied over a season, all those quarters of a run add up to about one win of value.4Run expectancy numbers are derived from a linear regression of linear weights value per pitch on batted ball velocity. Linear weights values come from Pitch Info.So that means FIP is flawed as an overall value metric, at least for some pitchers. Who are those pitchers? Here’s a table of all 485 pitchers with batted ball data this season as of the writing of this article.5This amounts to 17,768 batted balls. You may notice that most relievers are close to zero on this list. That’s because the model does not have enough data per reliever to be certain that they are altering velocity heavily, so it regresses their readings to the mean. Search for your favorite pitcher and see how many miles per hour he takes away from or adds to the average batted ball. The five best pitchers in the league: the Baltimore Orioles’ Wei-Yin Chen (balls leave the bat 1.63 mph slower than average when Chen pitches); the Chicago White Sox’s Chris Sale (1.56 mph); the Los Angeles Angels’ Garrett Richards (1.53 mph); the St. Louis Cardinals’ Adam Wainwright (1.46 mph, before he experienced a season-ending injury April 25); and the Houston Astros’ Dallas Keuchel (1.40 mph). Many of these pitchers are bona fide aces, most obviously Sale, Richards and Wainwright (Clayton Kershaw also lurks in ninth place). These players are not only adept at managing contact, they are also skilled strikeout artists. FIP accurately tabs them as great pitchers even without information about their contact-controlling abilities.These pitchers control their opposition’s quality of contact partly by driving the hitters into bad counts. In pitcher’s counts, hitters tend to put weak, defensive swings on the ball, resulting in glancing contact. About 15 percent of pitchers’ exit velocity suppression comes from controlling the count.6This estimate is derived by incorporating count into the model as a fixed effect and then determining how much the pitcher’s estimated random effect decreased. Richards, for example, has reached two-strike counts in 92 of his opponents’ plate appearances, compared with three-ball counts in only 38; in the former, hitters have a .271 BABIP, whereas in the latter, they have a .333 BABIP.7The league difference is a bit smaller, but still significant: .291 BABIP with three balls, .281 with two strikes.Chen is an intriguing case. The best at suppressing batted ball velocity, Chen also has the largest gap between ERA and FIP among qualified starters. In fact, Chen has put up a sizable gap between his ERA and FIP in three of the four years in which he’s pitched in MLB. Lacking batted ball velocity in years prior, we cannot say that his skill is consistent, but his results appear to be.FIP doesn’t only fail to credit the pitchers who manage their opponent’s batted ball velocity, it also fails to blame bad ones who consistently get hit hard.The league’s bottom five in that respect: the Pittsburgh Pirates’ Vance Worley (1.43 mph added to a ball’s exit velocity, compared with average); the Tampa Bay Rays’ Nate Karns (1.39 mph); the San Francisco Giants’ Tim Lincecum (1.16 mph); the Kansas City Royals’ Yordano Ventura (1.11 mph); and the San Diego Padres’ James Shields (1.06 mph). Just as the best pitchers tended to be better than average even by FIP, these five are worse. And while the aces use the count to their advantage, these pitchers are liable to find themselves in hitter’s counts, which causes some of their problems in the first place.Their exit velocity stats are also worse because they serve up pitches down the middle of the plate. Batters crave these meatballs and can punish them for extra-base hits and home runs. When I took pitch location out of the model, the pitchers’ effects on batted ball velocities fell by 20 percent on average.8Location was added into the model with a quadratic term for horizontal and vertical coordinates after adjusting for the count.Ventura, the Royals’ young flamethrower, is a conspicuous member of this worst-in-the-league list. Like Worley and Karns, he tends to throw his four-seam fastball more often than the league average.9Using pitch tags generously supplied to me by Pitch Info. That’s significant because fastballs tend to get hammered the hardest (even adjusting for count and location). Ventura, and other fastball-heavy starters, run the risk of allowing harder contact and more hits.The idea that pitchers can, in fact, influence their BABIP is not new. Shortly after the initial publication of DIPS, Tom Tippett (currently employed by the Red Sox) wrote about how the best pitchers seemed to be able to control the probability that their struck pitches would fall for hits. Tippett had only anecdotal examples such as Pedro Martinez and Greg Maddux, so the sabermetric community coalesced on the idea that they could be exceptions to a very reasonable rule.Now that we have Statcast’s data, we can see otherwise. No one will mistake Wei-Yin Chen for Pedro Martinez, but it appears that Chen can repeatably depress his opponent’s batted ball velocity, and a statistic such as FIP will fail to credit him for that skill.10Fortunately, new statistics such as Baseball Prospectus’ DRA (Deserved Run Average) do take into account all the events in which a pitcher plays a part. In fact, individual pitchers’ DRAs better correlate with the velocity suppression effects I calculated than their FIPs do, indicating that DRA is capturing some of this skill. Statcast’s data is beginning to challenge not only our views of specific players, but also some of the fundamental precepts of sabermetrics.Special thanks to Baseball Savant for the batted ball data; Pitch Info and Harry Pavlidis for the use of pitch tag data; and Jonathan Judge, Greg Matthews, Harry Pavlidis and Dan Turkenkopf for helpful comments and feedback.CORRECTION (May 22, 11:38 a.m.): An earlier version of this article stated that Wei-Yin Chen had a sizable gap between his ERA and FIP all four years in which he pitched in the league. That wasn’t true in 2013, when his ERA was slightly higher than his FIP. read more

Ohio State womens volleyball to continue streak of road games

OSU sophomore middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe (10) and freshman outside hitter Luisa Schirmer (5) go for a block during a game against FGCU on Sept. 5 at St. John Arena. OSU won, 3-1.Credit: Emily Yarcusko / For The LanternThe Ohio State women’s volleyball team is set to hit the road to continue a series of 10 consecutive away games.The Buckeyes are scheduled to travel to Oxford, Ohio, this weekend to compete in the Miami (Ohio) University Invitational.OSU (6-3) is scheduled to play the University of Alabama-Birmingham (3-8) on Friday at 4 p.m., followed by a doubleheader on Saturday with Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (5-7) at 10 a.m. and tournament host Miami (Ohio) (5-4) at 7 p.m.Once the Buckeyes finish the final non-conference tournament of the season, they’ll be set to start Big Ten play. However, the Buckeyes aren’t scheduled to play a Big Ten opponent at home until Oct. 8 against Illinois.But senior outside hitter Erin Sekinger said she’s grown to like playing on the road throughout her career.“We look at it as road warriors,” Sekinger said. “It’s a different atmosphere and you get the crowd chanting against you, which gives you more motivation to play better.”Sophomore setter Maggie Heim added that playing more road games in front of “brutal” away crowds at the beginning of the year helps the team prepare for the season.OSU coach Geoff Carlston said the women are getting more comfortable with their offensive and defensive performances, but they cannot make the small errors like they did last weekend in the Millennium Hotel Invitational. OSU finished the tournament in Cincinnati, Ohio, with two wins split by a loss to the Ohio Bobcats.“We made some untimely errors against Ohio, but we made some really great, really big plays against (Syracuse and Xavier),” Carlston said. “You can’t give points away. Teams are too good to be missing serves.  We have to be aggressive, so we’re going to miss some serves, but we’re not missing back-to-back serves and serves at the end of games.”Once the Buckeyes conclude non-conference play, they are set to head to Minnesota and Wisconsin to open the Big Ten season. The Minnesota match is scheduled for Wednesday at 8 p.m., while the Wisconsin match is set for Sept. 28 at 2 p.m. read more

HEA Rate Decrease Anticipated On July 1

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Homer Electric Association, Inc. (HEA) members will likely see a decrease in their monthly bills beginning July 1, if the filing with the Regulatory Commission of Alaska (RCA) is approved. HEA anticipates using more lower cost hydroelectric power from the state’s Bradley Lake hydroelectric project over the coming quarter due to an abnormally high reservoir level at this time of year, according to the release. HEA issued a release on Monday stating that a proposed decrease to the Cost of Power Adjustment (COPA) rate from $0.08153 per kilowatt hour (kWh) to $0.07157 per kWh. The average residential member who uses 550 kWh/month will see a $5.48 decrease in their monthly bill. Pending approval from the RCA, the COPA decrease will be effective for all billings beginning July 1. The COPA is adjusted on a quarterly basis and primarily reflects the cost of natural gas used to generate power for HEA members as well as purchased power.last_img read more

Did You Know

first_imgStory Links Did you know…?A student-athlete may practice, but not compete, during the first five days of classes if the student-athlete is enrolled less than full-time, provided the student is otherwise eligible. See Bylaw 14.2.1.6 below for more information. 14.2.1.6 Exception—Practice During First Week of Class. A student-athlete may practice, but may not compete, during the institution’s first five days of classes if the student-athlete is enrolled in less than a minimum full-time program of studies, provided the student is otherwise eligible under all institutional, conference and NCAA requirements. (Adopted: 1/10/95 effective 8/1/95)Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Derek slams BJP for featuring children in promotional video

first_imgKolkata: Trinamool Congress Rajya Sabha MP Derek O’Brien came down heavily on the BJP for flouting the model code of conduct laid down by the Election Commission of India by featuring children under the age of 14 in its political promotional video.In his Twitter handle, O’Brien said: “After being insensitive to children with dyslexia, Modi and the BJP do it again! Children under 14 being used in political promo music video. Breaking EC rules. Shameless. #CheatIndia So desperate for votes?” Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseHe pointed out that the Delhi High Court in a judgment on 15 July, 2013, advised political parties to take note of provisions of Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000 which is concerns children in the age group 14 to 18 years. The court had said that the provisions under the act should not be flouted during election campaign. He alleged that Modi used pictures of jawans to seek votes. It may be mentioned here that various top Trinamool Congress leaders had been vocal against the BJP for its attempt to take credit of the Balakot air strike. Many banners were put at various points in the city by the state BJP leaders with photos of armed forces. They also brought the matter to the notice of the Election Commission. The Commission has however issued necessary instructions to the administration to remove all such banners.last_img read more

Rep Triston Cole hosts local office hours

first_img Categories: Cole News #### State Rep. Triston Cole of Mancelona will host local office hours for the month of September.“Listening to people’s concerns and ideas gives me a better perspective on critical issues in my community,” Rep. Cole said. “I want residents to know I am invested in them and effectively representing their needs and interests in Lansing.”The representative will be available at the following times and locations:Friday, Sept. 1Mio: 10 to 11 a.m. at Oscoda County Library, 430 8th St.;Hillman: 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. at Hillman Wright Library, 610 Caring St.; andGaylord: 3 to 4 p.m. at Otsego County Library, 700 S. Otsego Ave. 31Aug Rep. Triston Cole hosts local office hourscenter_img No appointments are necessary to attend office hours. Those unable to attend may contact the representative by email at [email protected] or by calling 1-(855)-DIST-105. Friday, Sept. 8Mancelona: 10 to 11 a.m. at Mancelona Township Library, 202 W. State St.; andCharlevoix: 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. at Charlevoix Public Library, 220 Clinton St.last_img read more