ETFCU Returns Nearly $4 Million To Members Via Checking Account Programs

first_imgEvansville Teachers Federal Credit Union paid out nearly $4 million to its members through consumer checking counts alone in 2018.The $3,797,732 returned to members through ETFCU’s premier checking accounts represent a 61 percent increase over the 2017 total. That included a return of 3% APY on balances of up to $20,000 for members who use Vertical Checking (up from a maximum of $15,000 in 2017); reward points on debit card purchases plus bonus ScoreCard reward points each month to Platinum Rewards Checking members, who can redeem for brand-name merchandise, travel, gift cards and more; and ATM-fee reimbursement anywhere worldwide up to $15 on both accounts.“Our mission is to provide the best value for our members,” ETFCU President and CEO Bill Schirmer wrote in a letter to members. “We do this through innovative products and services that provide real benefits on a monthly basis.”Members received $2,299,956 in interest on Vertical Checking, $1,099,583 in redeemable points for Platinum Rewards Checking, and $393,193 in ATM-fee reimbursements.ETFCU, which was recognized as Best in State for Banking and Credit Unions by Forbes in 2018, has grown to more than 205,000 members with assets of $1.8 billion. Schirmer was honored with the Indiana Credit Union League’s Professional Achievement Award in 2018, marking a first for an Evansville-based credit union leader.The credit union operates six offices in Evansville, along with Indiana locations in Fort Branch, Mount Vernon, Newburgh, Princeton and Vincennes, and Kentucky locations in Henderson and Owensboro (2). An office will open in Washington, Indiana, in the spring. For more information about ETFCU and its programs, go to etfcu.org. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

SMC students attend international SALT Summit

first_imgOver the summer, Saint Mary’s juniors Anne Maguire and Chiara Smorada traveled to Washington D.C. to attend the SALT (Summit Adventure Leadership Training) Summit, an event which sought to gather 150 student ambassadors from around the country in order to enhance their advocacy and leadership skills. The Summit, sponsored by Catholic Relief Services (CRS), focused on various social issues, including anti-human trafficking, climate change awareness, migration and refugee reform and global hunger. Smorada said in an email that CRS built the Summit around the mission statement, “I am the Cause. I am the Solution.”“Sometimes, when I hear about suffering around the world I feel powerless and frustrated — there are moments when I feel very isolated and insignificant in society,” she said.  Maguire said this mission statement is akin to a call to action. “[The statement] calls us all to hold ourselves accountable for the problems we have created as humans and, at the same time, recognizes how we need to start taking the steps to fix the problems that we’ve caused in order to live in a better world,” she said. The summit largely consisted of lectures from international Catholic Relief Services employees, as well as presentations from students, Maguire said. “Some students shared the projects that they’re involved in on their own campuses and the campaigning that they do,” she said. “[At the Summit] we can share ideas and collectively move forward in the best way that we can [in order to] find ways to address social justice issues on our own campuses.”The Summit energized Smorada’s desire to start mobilizing events at the College, she said. “To me, more than anything, the Summit was an energizer and eye-opener,” she said. “As I learned more about the work CRS does both overseas and domestically, I felt a desire to mobilize on Saint Mary’s campus. Hearing about other college and university chapters also gave me some event ideas.”Maguire said her group got the chance to come together with a few of the staff members who work under U.S. senators from Indiana Todd Young and Joe Donnelly and U.S. representative Jackie Walorski. Maguire said they even had the opportunity to meet with Donnelly for a few moments. “The highlight for me was being on Capitol Hill,” she said. “We met … Donnelly in person, but he was on the move so we only got to talk briefly. I just remember him saying to us, ‘you’re doing God’s work, keep it up.’ So he seemed very supportive and his office was very supportive. In general, all of the offices were very supportive.”Maguire said that she advises those doing advocacy work in congressional offices have “a clear and concise ask” as to efficiently direct the meeting so that they can effectively get their message across. “At our specific congressional meetings, we were talking about increasing funding for international development plans and humanitarian aid so that people — wherever they’re living — can feel safe and comfortable living there,” she said. “For the 2019 fiscal budget, there’s a certain amount of money that’s been proposed that would go to humanitarian and development programs to help communities around the world that are low-income and struggling in some way. Essentially, funding these programs would help improve their living situations now, but also work on sustainable solutions so that people can grow in their own communities and empower themselves to create sustainable livelihoods for the future.” The most surprising thing about these congressional meetings, Maguire said, was that everyone, regardless of political ideology, found some kind of common ground. “We spoke to political offices on both sides of the political spectrum — Republican and Democratic offices — and with our proposal, we were not sure before our meetings what the outcome would be,” she said. “I was really struck by the fact that, on both sides, we were able to reach some common ground on the issue of respecting the dignity of human beings and trying to uphold that through any kind of support. I was reminded that we can’t make assumptions about people who are different from us because we can still reach common ground despite their position in politics. We should be open to hearing another person’s perspective, despite our differences.” Smorada said these congressional meetings challenged her preconceived notions on reaching out to national, state  and local representatives. “Hearing both his support and encouragement from his staffers made me feel less hesitant to reach out to my representatives in the future. Now I know they want to hear from us,” she said. Maguire said students who feel passionately about social justice issues should let their heart guide them. “Start where you are, start with your own passions,” she said. “Everyone is different — everyone has different interests, everyone has different passions. If you’re starting where your heart is, you can go really far. We need people who think differently, who act differently, who see the world in different ways.”Tags: catholic relief services, CRS, SALT Summitlast_img read more

‘Outing’ the online liars

first_imgBeware of Gregory from Oakland. He is not single. Rather, he is married and cheats on his wife Saturday nights before church, no less. Not only that, but “he dyes his hair and lies about his age,” according to a post by his anonymous ex-girlfriend on Dontdatehimgirl.com. Michael of Fremont? His former girlfriend reports his bad temper, sexual deviance and marijuana addiction on the same Web site. “Don’t fall for his tricks because he will try and steal you blind,” she writes. “Ladies, if you see this one coming, run the other way!” And Jerome, the clubber from San Jose? He is a walking STD, says a recent caller on local radio station 94.9 FM’s nightly segment “Do Not Date.” Uncovering a potential partner’s lies or bad behaviors isn’t easy, especially in the online dating world, where well-written profiles or suave photos are hardly guarantees of a good heart and a clean record. But the Web in particular is stepping up with free sites such as Dontdatehimgirl.com, Truedater.com and Manhaters.com to “out” the liars, marrieds and those who fib about their age, height or weight. “There’s a thin line between putting your best foot forward and not being truthful,” says Tasha Cunningham, founder of the Miami-based Dontdatehimgirl.com. “I think it’s the biggest dilemma the online dating world faces.” Cunningham started the company in 2005 after dating a man for almost five months who was in the process of getting a separation. He failed to share that with Cunningham. The site claims 1 million members and receives 400,000 hits a day. Cunningham estimates that women have entered information on 30,000 men. MySpace of dating While the site is for women, 20 percent of members are male and join to participate in the He Said She Said forum. Members of the site post the full name, city and photograph of the creep they say wronged them, along with an at-times detailed description of exactly what said creep did. “It’s the MySpace of dating and relationships for women,” Cunningham explains. She even hears from women who’ve used True.com, which charges daters a premium membership fee to screen for marrieds and felons. On Dontdatehimgirl.com, women considering an online date, or just curious Web surfers, can read about men by plugging the men’s names into a search engine. They can e-mail the author directly for more details. And yes, men who disagree with what’s written can submit rebuttals. Male focus groups axed Cunningham’s idea for Dontdateherman.com, a similar concept for men to avoid female liars, but Greatguystodate.com will be up by June 1. “It’s wonderful men who nominate themselves or are nominated by the women in their lives,” she says. There is a halo over the “W” in Womansavers.com, also known as Manhaters.com. On this site, women fill out questionnaires about a man’s ego, trust issues and other datable qualities. A rating from zero to 122 is issued, and the average is a 23. Choose a longer questionnaire and answer questions with “this man is a complete slob who you have to pick up after” or “in the early stages, he’s really great, but once he has you hooked, all the relationship effort falls on your shoulders.” Men outraged Naturally, the Web sites have outraged men, both the cads and the innocent ones. They argue that the profiles are embarrassing, damaging or false, and that it’s unfair that the women remain anonymous while the men are fully disclosed. Many have demanded they be removed from the sites. But in the case of Dontdatehimgirl.com, the reviews don’t budge. The person who makes the post can remove it anytime, Cunningham explains. Some men have pursued legal action, with no success. “The soap box is not liable for what the speaker says,” explains Kurt Opsahl, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, citing Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Passed in 1996, it protects Web site owners from content posted by third parties. The speaker, however, still remains liable. Even an anonymous defamer can be tracked down through his or her IP address, Opsahl says. Aptly named, Truedater.com exposes the good and bad apples – of both sexes. Log on and plug in the member name or profile number of your potential date from one of the dating sites. The site works with 95 percent of them, from Match.com to Jdate.com, and prides itself on sticking to the stats: Is she really 5 feet 10 inches with a glistening mop of golden locks? Is that photo of him from this decade? “We don’t want any personal attacks,” says Jamie Diamond, a representative for Truedater.com. “If someone goes off on someone, we’re not interested in that. We also don’t want to be Judge Judy.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more