Irish eyes are smiling on UK after 3% tax hike at home

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Talent show

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Clearing the pipeline

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Hope in St Helier

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Gordon, you don’t know what you’re doing…

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Motorist killed while driving through flood in Central Jakarta

first_imgRead also: Widespread flooding in Greater Jakarta causes chaos for commutersRahmat’s body has been taken to Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM) in Central Jakarta, said Lilik.Mild to severe flooding occurred across Greater Jakarta on Tuesday following heavy rain throughout the previous night. Flooding paralyzed traffic on several major streets and brought several public transportation services to a halt.The capital and its surrounding areas have been experiencing constant rainfall since the rainy season started late last year. Massive flooding occurred on New Year’s Eve, claiming at least nine lives and displacing thousands of others. (syk)Topics : A motorcyclist identified as Rahmat Hidayat was found dead after attempting to ride through a flood on Jl. Gajah Mada in Central Jakarta on Tuesday morning.Central Jakarta Police traffic unit head Adj. Sr. Comr. Lilik Sumardi confirmed the accident to tempo.co, saying that Rahmat’s motorcycle had hit a pothole that was covered by water.The motorist lost control and was thrown from his vehicle before hitting his head on the sidewalk, which was also inundated by the floodwater. He died instantly.last_img read more

PREMIUMIndonesia hails ‘first step’ in US-Taliban peace deal

first_imgGoogle Forgot Password ? Indonesia US Taliban Afghanistan peace-accord Indonesia hailed the signing of a peace deal between the United States and the Afghan Taliban in Qatar over the weekend, calling it a “first step” forward in the ongoing peace process.The Taliban’s political chief met with senior diplomats from countries including Russia, Indonesia and Norway, hours after signing the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) deal with Washington aimed at ending the Afghan war, the hard-line Islamist group said in a statement on Sunday.Saturday’s accord was signed in the Qatari capital Doha by US special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad and Taliban political chief Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, with US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on hand to witness the ceremony.Soon after the agreement, US President Donald Trump said he would be personally meeting leaders of the Taliban in the near future and rejected criticism surrounding the deal signed … Log in with your social account Facebook Linkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Topics :last_img read more

Japan to bar entry for foreign travelers, including Indonesians

first_img“The new policy will be implemented until the end of April and could be extended,” the embassy said.Japan has yet to impose a lockdown, but stores and offices have been closed to implement social distancing and a work-from-home policy. However, it did not stop people in the capital shopping for food and household supplies, albeit in a calm and orderly manner, said the embassy.Read also: Indonesia, Japan commit to ‘cooperation’ against COVID-19The Japanese government has decided to postpone the 2020 Tokyo Olympics for a maximum of one year, with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe saying he wanted to see the world’s biggest sporting event become the beacon of the international community coming together to address mutual challenges, the embassy wrote.The embassy is consistently monitoring Indonesian citizens in Japan and is calling on them to obey instructions from the authorities.Assistance and help from the embassy can be accessed through its hotline at +818049407419 and email consular@kbritokyo.jp, as well as the website m.kbritokyo.jp.Topics : The visa suspension will come into effect on Saturday for visitors from several countries, including Indonesia. However, foreigners registered as residents for work or study purposes are still allowed to enter Japan but must be willing to be quarantined for 14 days.Read also: COVID-19: Indonesia suspends visa-free policy, expands ban for people from worst-hit countriesThe embassy said visa-free or visa-waiver policies would also be revoked upon the enactment of the new policy. The same goes for people traveling with APEC business travel cards, as they will not be allowed to enter Japan.Visas issued before March 27 by the Japanese mission in Indonesia will no longer be valid. New visa issuance will be halted starting from March 28. Japan is set to bar entry to citizens of several countries, including Indonesia, wishing to travel to the country starting on Saturday, following a consistent increase in confirmed COVID-19 cases in the East Asian nation.According to the Indonesian Embassy in Tokyo, Japan recorded 101 new cases on Friday morning, bringing the tally to 1,402 nationwide, resulting in 45 deaths.As of Friday, Tokyo had recorded 267 cases, putting the capital prefecture on top of the list with the highest tally, surpassing Hokkaido.last_img read more

Rapid testing, disinfection only work if mobility strictly limited: UI Medical School dean

first_imgIt was essential to limit people’s mobility during the rapidly escalating health crisis to flatten the infection curve, Ari added.The country continuously reported dozens of new positive cases every day in the past week. On Friday, it reported 153 new cases, totaling 1,046 accumulative cases with 87 deaths.Earlier, the Medical Professors Council at the medical school released a statement on Thursday for the government to order a lockdown, especially in areas where the spread had been fast like in Jakarta and Surabaya, East Java, because suggestions to engage in physical distancing were not effective enough to make people stay at home.A panel of experts also recommended a lockdown in Jakarta to the President on March 16.Topics : The dean of the University of Indonesia’s Medical School, Ari Fahri Syam, has suggested that all other efforts in containing the spread of the novel coronavirus, such as disinfectant spraying and rapid testing, hinge on the reduced mobility of the population.He reiterated the need for a lockdown to contain the outbreak. “There have been people, including former vice president Jusuf Kalla, who have suggested a lockdown. This is not a new idea. The key is, when a pandemic happens, we try to limit people’s movements,” he said.”If these people consistently stay at home after the disinfection, then the effort will be effective. This will not be the case if they still go in and out of potentially infectious areas,” Ari said on Friday, during an online press conference on the COVID-19 pandemic. Friday’s press conference also addressed public concern about the effectiveness of the rapid mass testing currently taking place in selected areas in the country, particularly in the COVID-19 “red zones” like the capital Jakarta and its neighboring province of West Java.Among those prioritized to get tested are health workers and people with contact history with coronavirus-infected persons, as previously instructed by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo.Ari explained that some of the rapid test results might come back negative as the virus was still possibly in the “window period”, or the time between infection and when lab tests can identify the infection.”People having contact history with suspected COVID-19 cases or patients who have yet to test negative should still impose the two-week self-quarantine,” he stressed.last_img read more

White House looks to Austria, South Korea for reopening ideas

first_imgThe Trump administration has cited success stories in South Korea and Austria as it calls for Americans to return to work — but those countries moved faster than the US to combat the pandemic and have been more cautious in reopening their economies.And a third country US officials once regarded as a model, Singapore, is now struggling with a resurgence of the outbreak.Secretary of State Michael Pompeo and White House economic adviser Kevin Hassett have said in the past two weeks that the Trump administration is monitoring those three nations as it plans for the US to reopen. Topics : The Labor Department announced Friday that an unprecedented 20 million jobs were lost in April as Americans sheltered themselves from the pandemic.States across the US South and Midwest including Georgia and Texas are beginning to reopen even as the number of infected continues to climb.“We’ve been able to contain the spread of the coronavirus in Texas,” the state’s governor, Republican Greg Abbott, said at the White House on Thursday. His state has more than twice as many cases as Austria and three times its population. “But at the same time, we created these surge forces that will go out to regions where there are flare-ups, and it’s like putting out a fire.”The US has endured the largest publicly reported outbreak in the world, with more than 1.3 million infections and at least 78,000 deaths. Cases and deaths are still mounting, even as Trump spurs governors to reopen. Trump is tested daily, while Vice President Michael Pence’s press secretary, Katie Miller, is now among the confirmed cases — a development that sent top US health officials into self-quarantine.Cautious reopeningThe US president has said he believes the country is now prepared to both return Americans to work and quickly respond when the virus flares up again.“I think you can really have it both ways,” Trump said April 26 during a Fox News town hall event, before spending the week regularly spurring along a reopening. “We have to get our country back. Yeah, I don’t want to do this forever.”Testing for the virus has been crucial in every country that’s managed to contain it. While the US has now conducted more than 8.4 million tests, well beyond the total in any other country, it was slow to ramp up and didn’t surpass 100,000 tests performed until March 19, according to data compiled by the Covid Tracking Project.The US has now conducted roughly 26,500 tests per million people, compared to about 35,000 per million for Austria and 30,800 per million for Singapore. South Korea had performed about 18,400 tests per million as of April 19, its most recent data by that measure.South Korea, which identified its first case on Jan. 20, the same day as the US, contained its outbreak to about 10,800 cases and just 256 deaths. Even so, it’s waited until this month to begin easing social-distancing restrictions — after bringing its infection rate to near zero. The nightclub outbreak has raised fears of a new wave.The Asian country began widespread testing far earlier than the US In early March, South Korea had the highest case total outside of China. By mid-March, more than 200,000 people had been tested in a country of about 52 million.It reported 34 new confirmed cases Saturday, compared to more than 25,000 in the US And yet the government is only moving to reopen schools and other public facilities like theaters and sports games this month, and doing so gradually and cautiously.“I hope people don’t read it wrong and think this policy change means the risk has disappeared or they can go back to their daily life without worrying,” said South Korean Prime Minister Chung Sye-kyun.Austria and SingaporeHassett said on April 28 that he’s following Austria closely: “We’ve been making a chart of Austria every day to sort of see, are there signs that when people open up, that things are inflecting in a way that would give the doctors concern.”Austria was one of the first countries to close down its economy as the virus began to spread. When its government announced the first social-distancing measures in March, only about 200 people in the entire country of about 9 million had tested positive for infection, and no one had yet died.The country began easing its lock-down measures on April 14, after case growth had fallen to less than 200 per day, and has only slowly relaxed — allowing, for instance, individuals to leave their homes without a specific purpose. Larger stores reopened this month, along with services including hairdressers. Hotels, restaurants and schools remain closed.The Austrian capital of Vienna has also instigated new rules, such as mandatory face masks in public places. And Chancellor Sebastian Kurz has said he won’t hesitate to reverse course if the numbers spike again. Austria has about 15,800 confirmed cases and 618 deaths; the country reported 14 new cases on Sunday.Pompeo said the US government has been watching Singapore’s handling of the outbreak, as well as South Korea. He noted in an April 29 interview on Fox News that Singapore has “had a resurgence in cases.”The country has gone from success story to warning sign. Singapore has had about 22,500 cases, but just 20 deaths. While the city-state reported 876 new cases on Sunday, its outbreak is nearly entirely concentrated among migrant workers living in dormitories, who make up nearly 90% of all cases.Now facing the largest publicly reported outbreak in Southeast Asia, Singapore’s less socially restrictive strategy has been replaced by a partial lockdown that’s being tightened and extended until June 1.center_img But they offer flawed comparisons at best, given the much larger size of the US and its outbreak, as well as measures taken to curb the virus.Austria acted faster than the US to clamp down on business and social life, while South Korea much more rapidly built a robust testing regime.Yet they are both now just edging toward easing restrictions, even with infection rates far lower than the US, and South Korea has seen a new flare-up in nightclubs. Singapore, meanwhile, has seen a second wave that has forced a pivot to mass testing.Public health experts have warned that reopening the US too quickly risks sparking a fresh wave of the outbreak, possibly leading to another, even more damaging shutdown. Trump, though, made his most forceful case over the past week, saying that easing restrictions would cost lives, but it’s a price “warrior” American citizens must tolerate to get the economy back on track.last_img read more