Tony Becca: ICC chairman says no to Big Three

first_img SECRETLY TALKED ABOUT BULLYING Remember, the takeover, as it was reported, was secretly talked about privately for some time before it became public, and when it came out and was met with opposition, the deals followed. The deals included plans for more Test matches and more money for the smaller teams, and two countries, New Zealand and the West Indies, supported the move, while Zimbabwe, South Africa, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan were all against it. The promise of money won the day, with Pakistan, the last join in, saying it was difficult to stand alone. The pieces of silver may not now arrive, and some of the seven may be disappointed, including the West Indies, who gave away their right, the right to have a voice around the table, the right of equality, and the right for which their predecessors had fought for so long and so hard. Maybe the West Indies four-day professional league is not now guaranteed. The “Big Three” takeover, however, may now end up as nothing but a nightmare, or a bad dream, and as an embarrassment to India, England, and Australia, and also the West Indies. Two Wednesdays ago, it was reported by cricinfo.com that Manohar, the present and new chairman of the ICC, the man who is also the new president of Indian cricket, and the man who succeeded N Srinivasan, the former Indian Board president, had criticised “the imbalance of power within cricket’s governing body” because of the constitution revamp last year which gave the boards of India, England, Australia “greater authority and a larger share of the revenue”. That is interesting: an Indian against an Indian, and Manohar could make all the difference, especially as England, one of Srinivasan’s supporters, is now, it is reported, supporting Manohar. Speaking in Dubai a few days ago, Manohar called the revamp “bullying”, while saying that “there were several faults in the ICC that he hopes to rectify during his term as chairman, which ends in June 2016”. The faults include his disagreement with three countries “bullying” the ICC because of his belief that “an institution is bigger than an individual”, his disagreement with the ruling which says that “all the three countries will be automatically represented on all major committees”, and his disagreement with the fact that “all the financial and commercial aspects of the executive committee will be controlled by the representatives of the three countries.” According to Manohar, “You should have the best man, whether he comes from Zimbabwe, or the West Indies, or even from an associate or affiliate to work on a committee, that will protect the interest of the ICC.” Under the new governance structure, while the BCCI president became the chairman of the ICC, the Cricket Australia chairman heads the five-man executive committee, and the England and Wales Cricket Board president continues to head the ICC’s finance and commercial committees. In January 2014, a draft, done by representatives of India, England, and Australia, was presented to the ICC. The draft was a revenue-distribution document and it proposed, among other things, such as the return to the days of colonialism, that India, England, and Australia get a greater share of the ICC’s revenue. The new chairman of the ICC, the new president of the BCCI, and the man who follows the recent president of the BCCI and the chairman of the ICC into office, said that he does not agree with the revenue-sharing formula simply because, “while it is nice to say that India will get 22 per cent of the total revenue of ICC, you cannot make the poor poorer and the rich richer only because you have the clout”. Early last year, people like Eshan Mani of Pakistan, Malcolm Speed and Malcolm Grey of Australia, Saber Hossain Chowdhury of Bangladesh, Ali Bacher of South Africa, Mike Atherton of England, and Clive Lloyd of the West Indies saw the light and spoke out against it, loud and clear. Today, apart from England’s Giles Clarke, it is Shashank Manohar, the president of the all-powerful BCCI and the chairman of ICC himself, and his stance is strongly supported by members of the cricket fraternity, among them, Cricket South Africa, which has expressed “enormous delight”, and Sri Lanka Cricket, which calls Manohar “a sensible man”. The West Indies Cricket Board’s dream of collecting US$10 million from the International Cricket Council (ICC) over the next eight years, starting in January, appears to be over. This is based on the stance of the new president of the ICC, Shashank Manohar, who is also the new president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI). The money was supposed to be payable to the West Indies, New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan for their support of cricket’s “Big Three”, India, England, and Australia, in their move to take over the ICC early last year. In any language, that is a lot of money, and it is a lot of money for doing nothing, except, possibly, for supporting the “Big Three” in their bid for control of the ICC. That figure represents the money for the Test Match Fund promised to the full members of the ICC, with the exception of India, England, and Australia, and it was promised to them for their support in the much-maligned bid. Lest you have forgotten, the aim of the Test Match Fund was “to encourage Test match cricket” outside the “Big Three”. According to the ICC, with all but the “Big Three” suffering loses when they play each other, it was likely that the money would be used to offset these loses. Recently, for example, Sri Lanka lost some $648,000 while hosting the West Indies. In announcing the release of the funds recently, the ICC did not, however, make mention of the terms of usage, or how it would hold the Boards accountable to the objective of encouraging Test cricket. Maybe the ICC did not have to, or did not intend to, if the money was really for the Test Match Fund and was something of an attraction, something like a bribe, to get the seven to vote for the “Big Three”.last_img read more

Essequibo teacher allegedly drowns after seizure

first_imgThe head teacher of the 8th of May Primary School on the Essequibo Coast, Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam) is believed to have drowned after falling into a drain, while suffering an epileptic seizure on Thursday afternoon.Dead is 43-year-old Seroojanie Singh. <<<>>>> understands that the head teacher usually suffers bouts of seizures and is usually accompanied by someone whenever she goes on the road.However on Thursday, Singh left her Westbury, Essequibo Coast, school alone and rode on a bicycle to the Flora Nursery in Dartmouth – a half mile journey – to meet with the head teacher of that school.The incident occurred while Singh was returning to her school sometime around 13:30h. According to information reaching this newspaper, the head teacher suffered a seizure and fell into a nearby drain in Dartmouth Back Street.Residents immediately rushed to her assistance and she was taken to the Oscar Joseph District Hospital in Charity, where she was treated but subsequently died sometime around14:00h.According to residents, “Miss Rona”, as she was popularly known, was a single-parent who worked very hard as a teacher to provide for her two children who are now adults.Singh started to teach at a tender age of 18 and was only promoted to head teacher of the 8th of May Primary School about one month ago.Her teaching staff and pupils were all in shock after receiving news of her tragic death. In fact, Regional Education Officer (REO), Nicola Matthews, dismissed the school for the reminder of the day after visiting and seeing the teachers in tears.Everyone described the 43-year-old woman as a good teacher, mother, colleague, neighbour and friend.Residents say the community lost a “superwoman” who was always friendly and willing to help others.last_img read more

Real Madrid’s Luka Modric questioned over alleged false testimony

first_img“My conscience is clear,” the 31-year-old Croatia captain said.“I’m certain that eventually it will be shown that I did not commit any criminal act.”In June the prosecutors opened a probe of Modric whom they suspect of giving false testimony during Mamic’s trial, which is punishable with up to five years in jail.Mamic is accused — along with his brother Zoran Mamic and two others — of abuse of power and graft that cost the former Croatian champions more than 15 million euros ($16.9 million), and the state 1.5 million euros.Cash was allegedly embezzled through fictitious deals related to player transfers.Modric testified in mid-June over the details of his 2008 transfer from Dinamo to Tottenham Hotspur.From there he joined Real Madrid in 2012.The prosecutors alleged that, when questioned at the tribunal, Modric falsely said he had signed an annex to a contract with Dinamo over conditions for future transfers in July 2004.When questioned during investigations in 2015, Modric said the annex was signed after he joined Tottenham, according to the prosecutors.Another Croatian international, Liverpool defender Dejan Lovren, is to appear as witness in September.The 28-year-old is expected to be questioned over his 2010 transfer from Dinamo to French side Lyon.The trial, which opened in April, has attracted huge interest from media and residents of Osijek where it is being held reportedly to avoid Mamic’s influence on judges in the capital Zagreb.Mamic is considered the most powerful man in Croatian football and his connections extend into many spheres of public life.Most Croatian football fans see him as the real boss of the Croatian Football Federation and believe its formal chief Davor Suker is merely Mamic’s puppet.Modric, who grew up as a refugee in Zadar on the Dalmatian coast, is highly popular in Croatia where he has a reputation for modesty.ljv/cw0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Real Madrid’s Luka Modric © AFP/File / Odd ANDERSENZAGREB, Croatia, Jul 5 – Croatian prosecutors on Wednesday questioned Real Madrid’s Luka Modric over his alleged false testimony at the trial of Dinamo Zagreb’s powerful former boss, Zdravko Mamic.“I came here to present my defence and tell the truth as every time so far,” Modric told reporters after the questioning in the eastern town of Osijek, where the trial is being held, the state-run HINA news agency reported.last_img read more

Party Politics Texas Edition Ep 32 A Shooting A Death Penalty Case

first_imgEric Gay | AP via NPRLaw enforcement officials gather Monday at the scene of a deadly shooting the previous day at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs in Sutherland Springs, Texas Then, the guys get into how the 2018 election cycle is starting to shape up now that U.S. Rep. Ted Poe (R-Humble) has decided not to run again and Lupe Valdez, Dallas County Sheriff,  is considering running for governor of Texas. By the way, don’t forget to check out our national episodes of Party Politics, too.Party Politics is produced by Edel Howlin and our audio engineer is Todd Hulslander.  This article is part of the Party Politics podcast Share On this weeks’ episode of Party Politics: Texas Edition, co-hosts Jay Aiyer and Brandon Rottinghaus get into the politics of: Gun control after the shooting in Sutherland Springs last weekend. Twenty-six people were killed and another twenty were injured when Devin Patrick Kelley entered First Baptist Church with a semi-automatic rifle. A death penalty case turns into life in prison for an intellectually disabled inmate.   00:00 /19:26center_img What happened with all of those amendments we talked about last week?  Listen X A long list of Texas legislators accused of varying types of sexual harassment is released.   To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more