Priscila: “I don’t see ethical or fair that the season ends like this”

first_imgAs for the season, Priscila hopes to finish playing it after overcoming this crisis. “I do not see ethical that the season ends thus. I do not even consider it. Without the World Cup and Absolute Europeans, it is viable for now to extend the League, which ends soon in May, and play in June or try to put two games per week. Nor do we have as many matches to play (nine, with the strike day included), “says the attacker, who dedicates his quarantine to staying in shape” to return in the best way “and studying the police opposition.” The most difficult is not to touch the ball, “he highlights.” This season I did not start very well physically either due to different circumstances and then I have reached a good level again. Now I am trying to stay home as best as possible and I am on the path of not losing shape. When I return, I hope to do it with more desire and more strength “, he maintains.“I compare Rosa Márquez with Iniesta”In addition, Priscila reviews the adversities she has overcome during her career. “I worked in a hotel in Sabadell, in a cafeteria in Badajoz or in a school and in a bakery in Madrid. It has not cost me, but it is true that I highly value not having to do it now to play soccer,” says the Betis striker, who never expected to be in the First Division for so long: “When I started playing I did not expect the results or spend so much time in the First Division. The League has changed a lot and has suffered from everything, format changes and bad streaks. Now at last it seems that everything is settling down, with the agreement and with perfectly regulated contracts. It is a joy to see how all this has changed. “AFE ‘); return false; “class =” item-multimedia “>Priscila talks about the agreement during the players’ press conference at the AFE headquarters.AFE About the agreement he also expressed his opinion. Priscila believes that “it has taken a long time” and that the most important thing for her firm is to regulate the price and injuries. “LOr more importantly, the agreement is that if I have started working at the age of 20, I have been listed since then and not only for a few years. Me because I have been fortunate enough to contribute with the different jobs I have had, but another person would now be 35 years old with hardly having contributed for his retirement, “says Priscila, who also remembers the bad years she spent without collecting in Sabadell, the problems with the flat in Huelva or how he has had to sacrifice himself and be away from his family for fourteen years. “What I value most of all that is that I never lost hope. “ sentenced the Andalusian forward, who despite not having had many references points to the attacker Auxi Jiménez as her greatest example to follow and highlights the great talent of teammates like Rosa Márquez :. “I compare Rosa Márquez with Iniesta. She has a more than promising future and we will surely see her winning titles.” Priscila Borja is one of the veterans who lead the First Iberdrola. The Betis striker and top scorer, who has completed twenty seasons in the top flight, attended AS by telephone in the midst of the health crisis that the whole country has stopped to assess how this campaign has been, which he described as “roller coaster”. “I see everything positive and I believe that these adversities are going to make us grow both personally and athletically. I really want to see the faces of my teammates and embrace them. We have a very nice goal ahead and we must go for it”, exposes.At 35, Priscila remains at a great physical level, being the undisputed starter at Betis, and has not yet decided whether to hang up his boots or continue another year as a green-white. In the past season the same thing happened to him and the Seville ended up renewing for another course with the Heliópolis painting. “It was clear to me to retire this season and now between the strike, the agreement or the health crisis, among other things, I am rethinking everything. What I miss the most is playing football, “highlights Betica, which reveals the secret of being so well after two decades playing at the highest level:” There are several influencing criteria. One is work, both physical and mental, then there is a bit of genetics and luck plays an important role in terms of injuries and having the confidence of the coach. You also have to feel young. For example, I’m still very excited to play soccer. ““Pier gives us responsibility and freedom”For her part, the Andalusian attacker regrets that the break has come at the best time for the team. “This crisis has come when we were better, in a crescendo improvement of the team. But well the same is a new opportunity, “he highlights, shortly before evaluating Pier’s arrival on the verdiblanco bench:” All the changes are good and we came from a dynamic of not being comfortable with the game and the results. We were not having results. When Pier arrived we started to score some points and that encouraged us a lot“Of the former Betis player, Priscila states that he is a coach who gives you” responsibility and freedom. “” He always gives us freedom on the field and that implies responsibility. Play with that double-edged sword and the players have welcomed it very well. At the end he has been a player and he knows perfectly what the players feel“he assures. Betis’); return false; “class =” item-multimedia “>Priscila hugs Pier after a First Iberdrola match.Betislast_img read more

Ancient humans hunted monkeys for tens of thousands of years

first_img Ancient humans hunted monkeys for tens of thousands of years N. Amano Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Early humans settled in this Sri Lankan cave 45,000 years ago. O. Wedage Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Virginia MorellFeb. 19, 2019 , 12:05 PM Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) If you picture early humans dining, you likely imagine them sitting down to a barbecue of mammoth, aurochs, and giant elk meat. But in the rainforests of Sri Lanka, where our ancestors ventured about 45,000 years ago, people hunted more modest fare, primarily monkeys and tree squirrels. Then they turned the bones of these animals into projectiles to hunt more of them. The practice continued for tens of thousands of years, making this the longest known record of humans hunting other primates, archaeologists report today. Many scientists believed such forests lacked the resources for early humans to successfully settle. Instead, our ancestors apparently quickly adapted to this and other challenging environments (such as high elevations and deserts), in part by figuring out how to reliably hunt difficult-to-catch prey.To conduct the research, archaeologist Patrick Roberts of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (SHH) in Jena, Germany, and colleagues analyzed animal bones recovered from Sri Lanka’s Fa Hien Cave in Kalutara during excavations from 2009 and 2012. Materials and artifacts including charcoal, faunal remains, shell beads, and bone and stone tools indicate people occupied the site from about 45,000 to 4000 years ago. The archaeologists also uncovered numerous microliths (minutely shaped stone tools), whose purpose is as yet unknown, but were likely used for hunting. In addition, they identified some three dozen finished or partially completed bone projectile points. These ancient humans were using “bones from the hunted monkeys to hunt more monkeys,” says study co-author Noel Amano, an archaeologist at SHH.Finally, the remains reveal that the early Sri Lankans were sustainable hunters, primarily targeting adult animals, the scientists report today in Nature Communications. “They hunted these animals for nearly 40,000 years, without driving any to extinction,” Roberts says. “So they must have had sophisticated knowledge of monkey life cycles and an understanding of how to use resources wisely.”The findings support the idea that, as humans spread across the world, they had to shift from hunting large, roaming animals like mammoth and bison to smaller prey that “could withstand a higher rate of predation,” says archaeologist Robin Dennell at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, who was not involved in the study.These ancient humans probably already knew how to hunt more agile and elusive game, says Steve Kuhn, an archaeologist at the University of Arizona in Tucson. People had started to hunt small animals in Eurasia about the same time they first entered Sri Lanka, he notes, and so likely arrived with these skills.Kuhn also cautions that the early Sri Lankans might not have been such wise resource managers; more likely the human populations were small and “didn’t make much of an impact.” They hunted more monkeys and squirrels and fewer deer or pigs, he thinks, simply because the smaller animals were likely more abundant. Like those of us who don’t have time to shop and cook, and so grab a burger, these early people may have simply hunted and dined on the animals that were most readily available. Early Sri Lankans turned the bones of the monkeys and squirrels they hunted into these projectile points. The scientists analyzed almost 14,500 animal bones and teeth from four periods of occupation and found that gazelle-size mammals were the most common. Monkeys (primarily macaques and purple-faced langurs, the latter of which inhabit the tallest trees, reaching some 45 meters) and tree squirrels made up more than 70% of the identified remains, which also included otters, fish, reptiles, and birds. Fewer than 4% of the bones came from deer, pigs, and bovids, such as buffalo. Many bones bore cut marks from butchery and had been burned, signs that humans processed them for meat.last_img read more