Ørsted, world’s largest wind developer, sees growth opportunities in current market upheaval

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Ørsted A/S, the world’s largest wind farm developer, is sticking to its growth strategy and financial guidance amid the coronavirus pandemic and said it could even eke out an advantage as others in the market step on the brakes.While the Danish utility has put into place cautionary measures to help buffer the impact of the crisis, including increasing its provisions and conducting wide-ranging risk assessments on new projects, executives said the company’s EBITDA guidance range for 2020 of between 16 billion kroner and 17 billion kroner will remain intact, and its appetite for building new projects will stay strong.“We believe financially robust companies that maintain a long-term view on the market are likely to find additional opportunities in the wake of the current crisis,” CEO Henrik Poulsen said April 29 on the company’s first-quarter earnings call.Ørsted saw substantial earnings growth during the first quarter, largely powered by strong wind resources. “We are in a much less vulnerable position than many other sectors that regrettably are deeply impacted by this crisis,” Poulsen said. “However, the impact of COVID-19 will have material ripple effects throughout all economies and sectors. And you can rest assured that we will not be complacent about its potential impact on Ørsted.”In the short term, however, several Ørsted projects risk construction delays due to supply chain disruption, specifically because tools were laid down at a shipyard in Singapore that was building substations for the Hornsea 2 and Greater Changhua offshore wind farms. Deliveries of solar panels for the Permian Energy solar project in the U.S. are also delayed, Poulsen said.Despite this, Ørsted’s appetite for taking new projects remains strong. “We are still looking into a very significant number of auctions and tenders in 2020 and 2021 as most countries and states stick to the original timeline despite the COVID-19 situation,” Poulsen said.[Camilla Naschert]More ($): Ørsted doubles down on growth ambitions as others retreat due to COVID-19 Ørsted, world’s largest wind developer, sees growth opportunities in current market upheavallast_img read more

Violence against children triggered by burden on mothers amid COVID-19: Survey

first_imgThe unequal burden of child care and housework on women has prompted a domino effect leading to violence against children as mothers juggle amid the COVID-19 health crisis that has turned homes into offices and classrooms, a recent survey by the Indonesian Child Protection Commission (KPAI) finds.The online survey was conducted between June 8 and 14 involving 25,164 child respondents and 14, 169 parents in 34 provinces. Of the parent respondents, 74.4 percent were women and 25.6 percent were men.The survey showed that child care was mostly done by mothers, from giving the children information about health protocols amid the pandemic to assisting their study and other activities as well as teaching them to care for others. Meanwhile, 21 percent of fathers never helped their children to study and 17.5 percent never accompanied them in doing activities other than studying.The survey also found that only 33.8 percent of parents had participated in training or received education about parenting.Read also: COVID-19 pandemic forces Indonesian mothers to do it all“The unequal division of labor and the mental load shouldered by mothers, combined with children engaging in activities deemed unproductive by parents such as watching TV, sleeping and playing video games, has led to violence,” KPAI head Susanto said in a written statement obtained by The Jakarta Post on Thursday. The majority of child respondents said they received abuse from mothers (60.4 percent), followed by siblings (36.5 percent) and fathers (27.4 percent). Meanwhile, 79.5 percent of children experienced mental abuse by mothers, followed by fathers (42 percent) and siblings (20.4 percent).From the parent’s side, 42.5 percent of mothers and 32.3 percent of fathers admitted to having inflicted physical abuse on their children, while 73 percent of mothers and 69.6 percent of fathers said they had carried out psychological abuse.The physical abuse takes the form of pinching (39.8 percent), tweaking ears (19.5 percent), hitting (10.6 percent) and pulling (7.7 percent). The children also reported psychological abuse such as being scolded (56 percent), compared to other children (34 percent), yelled at (23 percent) and glared at (13 percent).However, the majority of child respondents in the survey reported positive emotions despite experiencing violence, indicated by a happy feeling of having more time to help parents (60.3 percent), getting closer to parents (59.7 percent) and learning more with parents (40.5 percent).Read also: COVID-19: How to protect your child’s mental healthThe KPAI urged parents, both fathers and mothers, to be equally involved in parenting and doing household chores to minimize the risk of violence against children.“Fathers must take a bigger role in parenting because children need both parents. The intimacy between children and parents is important in the child’s development,” Susanto said.Furthermore, the KPAI highlighted the need to constantly promote consulting services to parents and children so that victims of violence could report to the right place and it can be handled effectively.Topics :last_img read more

Swans refute Utrecht’s Vorm claims

first_img Dutch international Vorm, who was a member of Holland’s squad at this summer’s World Cup in Brazil, moved to White Hart Lane last month for what Swansea described as an undisclosed fee. “The transfer of Michel Vorm was conducted and concluded correctly under Premier League rules,” a Swansea spokesman said. “It was approved by the Premier League and also FIFA via their TMS (Transfer Matching) system. “While we have been in contact with Utrecht as a matter of courtesy, we will continue to conduct our business in the best interest of our football club and our supporters, and not based on the views of other clubs. “Unlike some countries abroad, we do not have third party ownership of players in Britain. “The club will not be commenting further on this matter.” Utrecht general manager Wilco van Schalk claimed on Friday that Swansea chairman Huw Jenkins had told him Vorm had gone to Tottenham “for free”. Schalk told BBC Wales: “That’s unbelievable and unacceptable. “Michel is a very reliable goalkeeper in the Premier League. He is 30-years-old, in the prime of his life. He still had a two-year contract and has a good reputation. “Besides that, he’s a solid member of the Dutch squad. We want to have the 30 per cent as we agreed.” Vorm’s former club Utrecht have threatened to report Swansea to FIFA. The Eredivisie club claim they have not received 30 per cent of Vorm’s transfer fee, which they allege was part of a sell-on agreement between them and the Swans when he moved to Wales for £1.5million in 2011. Swansea say the transfer of goalkeeper Michel Vorm to Tottenham was “conducted and concluded correctly under Premier League rules”.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more