Gifford Medical’s Last Mile Ride raises $40,000

first_imgSaturday’s Last Mile Ride – Gifford Medical Center’s annual charity motorcycle ride – attracted more than 180 riders and raised approximately $40,000 for end-of-life care at the nonprofit Randolph medical center.Started in 2006 by Gifford nurse and motorcyclist Lynda McDermott of Randolph, the ride has grown significantly in the five years since in both the number of riders it attracts and the money it raises. This year’s ride took motorcyclists through about 100 miles of central Vermont countryside through Randolph, Northfield, Montpelier, Middlesex, the Mad River Valley, Rochester, Bethel and more. Orange County Sheriff Bill Bohnyak led the ride and combat veterans provided “road guard” services. The ride ended at the hospital with a chicken and rib barbecue and live music from local group “Two for the Show and Company.” Riders were also given free massages and awarded prizes. Riders who raised the most money for the cause received gifts from area motorcycle dealers.Topping the list of riders who raised the most were Tim and Patty Schroeder, who raised $1,847; Linda Chugkowski and Robert Martin, who raised $1,810; and Reg and Rose Mongeur, who collected more than $1,300.Reg Mongeur, a combat veteran, also served as a road guard and rode in memory of his late mother, Caroline Mongeur, who died in Gifford’s Garden Room in May.The Garden Room is a garden-side suite for dying patients and their families. The ride supports free services for those patients as well as for other patients in advanced illness, family bereavement services and special training for Gifford’s staff.“The staff at Gifford and the Garden Room … they made the transition between life and death a lot smoother. Everybody involved from the Gifford side of it, it was like it was their family (member) too,” says Reg Mongeur of how his mother was treated. The experience made Reg all the more supportive of the ride and gave him drive to raise money so others could experience the same service.And Reg – a Vietnam veteran – got a bit of a surprise of his own at the ride.Riders gave the combat veterans a standing ovation for their help at the ride. The act of kindness brought tears to the Vietnam vet’s eyes.This year’s ride also included the raffle of a Harley-Davidson Sportster 883 Low from Wilkins Harley-Davidson in Barre. Art Peper, a 92-year-old World War II and Korean War veteran and prison of war, won the motorcycle.Ride organizer Ashley Lincoln called Peper with the news immediately after the ticket was drawn.“I didn’t believe it,” said Peper, who had collected antique Indian and Harley motorcycles before selling them a few years ago.Schroeder sold Peper the winning ticket on behalf of the hospital. “When Tim sold me the ticket he said, ‘This is the lucky ticket,’ and it was.”Peper bought the ticket to support the ride, not expecting to win. He’s now not quite sure what he’ll do with his shiny new Harley, which Schroeder delivered on Saturday afternoon.  “It’s fun, but I don’t think I’ll ever ride it,” said the Randolph resident who has had visitors and plenty of phone calls – some from people he hasn’t talked to in years – since his big win.“It made him very happy,” notes his wife, Rose.Peper’s says he’s just happy the ride raised so much money for end-of-life care.Other winners included Thom Goodwin, a hospital employee from Corinth, who won a stunning quilt make by Gifford nurses. “I’m thrilled and elated. Five nurses poured their heart into creating this. When I look at the quilt I can be reminded daily of what a caring and compassionate community Gifford is,” Goodwin said.And ride volunteer and pediatrician Dr. Mitsu Chobanian was the winner of a 50/50 raffle.The date for next year’s ride has already been set. It will be held Aug. 20, 2010. Visit the hospital’s Web site, www.giffordmed.org(link is external) for updates on 2011 ride and more photos from this year’s ride.The other Last Mile RideMotorcycles roared through the area on Saturday to raise money for end-of-life care at Gifford Medical Center in Randolph. But one rider had a much quieter start and finish. Marci White, a Gifford nurse, wife and mother from Braintree, rode her pedal bicycle 37 miles to Northfield and back Saturday morning to support the cause.Source: Gifford Medical Center. 8.24.2010last_img read more

Antique IP school seeks more fund for ‘unfinished’ building

first_img“For this school year, we are about tohave our classes this month,” she said. SAN JOSE, Antique – The School for Living Tradition (SLT) of the Ati IndigenousPeoples (IP) in Sitio Pantad, Barangay Igcalawagan in Tobias Fornier town needsadditional fund for its unfinished building. The fund from the NCCA, according to Pauden,was not enough as their school has no wall or flooring yet. The budget was usedto construct a one-floor concrete building where they hold classes for theirtraditional dance which they call “Miroy Criñosa”; “Inati” language; andweaving using local materials such as buriand nito for pouches and bags. Delia Pauden, head of the Pantad AtiTribe Association and serves as SLT teacher, said they are asking theprovincial government for an additional fund including for constructionmaterials to finish their school. “The National Cultural Center for theArts (NCCA) allotted a P150,000 budget for the construction of our SLT lastOctober2018,” she said. Delia Pauden (right) holds classes for Ati children in their School for Living Tradition in Sitio Pantad, Barangay Igcalawagan, Tobias Fornier, Antique. DELIA PAUDEN center_img The SLT was conceptualized for theirtribe members to learn and preserve their traditional culture, art, andlivelihood. “If we don’t teach our traditionalculture, art, and livelihood, the new generation will tend to forget it,”Pauden said. Last year, she said they only met in adesignated place because they have no classroom. Even without the concretestructure, she said they were able to gather 70 Atis, mostly mothers as well astheir children in the community, to join the classes. “With the concrete structure for our SLTwe would be able to have a better place where to learn,” she said./PNlast_img read more

Lesotho are dangerous -Jawula, Arday warn Stars

first_imgFormer Chairman of the Ghana Football Association, Lepowura M.N.D Jawula and veteran coah, Sam Hemans Arday are cautioning the Black Stars not to consider victory against Lesotho in this weekend’s World Cup qualifier a done deal as they could end up laughing at the wrong side of their mouths.While Lepowura is urging the Stars to be guided by history, Coach Arday says Lesotho will just be happy to upset the Stars apple cart.The Stars are away to the Likuena (Crocodiles) of Lesotho in their last but one game in these qualifiers, but are talks of that match being an easy deal for the Ghanaians with more focus rather on the very last game against Zambia in September.Lepowura Jawula, who led the the Stars to a qualifying match in Lesotho during his tenure, says it will be dangerous for the Stars to consider the Likuena as pushovers.Zambia currently lead the group standings with 10 points, one ahead of the Stars and with Zambia also tipped as favourites in their home match against Sudan on Saturday, a win for the Stars will help mantain the pressure on the Chipolopolos with that one-point for their September clash.“On paper it is predictable that the winner of Group D will be decided by the in the final match between Ghana and Zambia and so most people may be carried away by that. “ Yes it is important to talk about the Zambia game in September, but of what importance will that match be if the Stars slipped against Lesotho and dropped valuable points while the Zambians are able to scale the Sudan hurdle?“ It is therefore important for the Stars to also consider the game in Maseru a difficult, but must-win one to keep the momentum for the Zambia return leg.”Lepowura Jawula cautioned the Stars to be reminded of how Ghana struggled and had to come from behind to draw 3-3 with Lesotho in an Africa Cup of Nations qualifier in Maseru in 2001 to know that tough times lied ahead on Sunday.Though Charles Amoah gave Ghana the lead in that game, Lesotho took a commanding 3-1 lead. The Stars were saved the blushes from a 85th and 90th minute strikes from Nana Arhin-Duah.“Lesotho are dangerous at home and the Stars must not be carried away by their 7-0 win in the first encounter and go into the game as if they can override them again. They may not score as many goals but they are capable of being an impediment.“Lesotho know they have nothing to lose in the outcome of this encounter, but they will be thrilled to scupperbe credited with the fact that they will be the ones to hamper the chances of the Stars with a revenge for the 7-0 beating they received in Kumasi in the opening game. They will even be out to also help the cause of their neighbours, Zambia who currently lead and could do with such a big favour as Ghana dropping valuable points. “Unlike other blocks where no one wants to do the neighbour a favour, alliance is very strong in Southern Africa and that could motivate Lesotho to give Ghana a very tough time on Sunday,” Lepowura Jawula said.Coach Sam Arday, who has also coached the Stars, also gave similar advise and stressed the need for Kwasi Appiah to adopt a strategy that will force the Likuena to open up.“ Having conceded as many as seven goals against Ghana and four against Zambia last week, they will likely play a very defensive game which could frustrate the Stars but Kwasi Appiah must adopt a style that will hold them to their own game at least for the first 15 minutes which will then force them to open up,” Coach Arday advised.last_img read more