State Department Gets Shelter Mag Makeover

first_imgThe Magazine Publishers of America announced today that the U.S. State Department has enlisted the magazine industry to help decorate 17 rooms for the holiday season at the U.S. State Department buildings in Washington, D.C. An early gift for the remaining shelter titles, the “Magazine Holiday Design Showcase” is planned as an annual event and “part of an ongoing campaign to highlight the furnishingsand art in both the Blair House and the State Department,” according to the release. Of course, shelter titles are no strangers to designing show rooms. Over the past few years, publishers like Hachette and Hearst, among others, have launched initiatives pairing their shelter titles with various kinds of room design.As part of the showcase, each magazine will be assigned one or more historic State Department rooms [pictured]—Diplomatic Reception rooms in the Harry S. Truman building or receiving rooms in the Blair House, the President’s guest house for foreign dignitaries—and are scheduled to unveil the final designs on December 7.Among the 17 rooms undergoing a mass magazine makeover, The Blair House Back Room will bedecorated by Better Homes and Gardens with a nine-foot Christmas tree covered in coral-colored ornaments, while Mother Earth News and Natural Home will execute a non-traditional Adams Room design at the State Department with growers from across the country providing rare varieties of heirloom grains, apples and other foods.The magazines are funding the makeovers themselves. Polskin told FOLIO: that each magazine would determine its budget for this project and only put in “what they feel comfortable spending.” Participating titles, including Better Homes and Gardens, Martha Stewart Living, Mother Earth News, Natural Home, This Old House and Traditional Home, are racing against the clock to complete these rooms from start to finish in only a few weeks. “This [the partnership] hit our radar screens earlier this month [November], so it’s been a rush,” MPA senior vice president of communications & events Howard Polskin told FOLIO:.last_img read more

New Type of Drug Offers Hope for Migraine Sufferers

first_imgSHUTTERSTOCKMigraines can result from certain genes, a stressful life, environmental conditions or some changes in your diet. They often develop in your 20s to 40s.Various medications and therapies can provide relief, but the FDA has approved the first in a new class of drug aimed at heading off migraine headaches before they start. There are headaches, and then there are migraines.“Oh, my god. I can’t tell you how disabling migraines can be,” said Dr. Priyanka Chaudhry, a neurologist at Baylor University Medical Center specializing in headaches.“When patients come to me, they often say, ‘When I have a bad headache, I’m missing a social event. I’m missing time with my family. I can’t go out or do work.’ So, it’s that disabling.”The new drug is a CGRP monoclonal antibody developed to prevent headaches.“It’s a once-a-month injection used to decrease the number of headache days that they have in a month,” Choudhry said. “In some cases, it will also make sure that you have less intense headache or the duration of the headache actually goes down.”Interview HighlightsOn the importance of the new drug: This is the most exciting phase in the headache world because in the last several years, we have not had a new drug which has been developed specifically for migraine. This drug is a CGRP monoclonal antibody. The fancy name is “calcitonin gene-related peptide,” which basically was developed to prevent headaches or to use it as a rescue. It’s one-of-a kind because CGRP is released when someone has a migraine or a head attack and [the drug] actually helps to inhibit or to antagonize the effects of CGRP.How the new drug works: It’s a once-a-month injection used to decrease the number of headache days that they have in a month. In some cases, it will also make sure that you have a less intense headache or the duration of the headache actually goes down.How the new drug differs from current medication: We use two kind of medications now: One is rescue, usually use triptans or over-the-counter inserts, and then, preventives like antidepressants, anti-nausea medication, antihypertensive — something you use once a day. The problem with preventives is the high side effects and it takes a long time for them to work.What we’re noticing with this new drug is that patients don’t really get much side effects. Also, it works a lot faster. It works within a month where as some of the other drugs can take eight to 10 weeks to show an efficacy.The drug’s cost ($6,900 per year, depending on insurance): The company is providing at least two doses free, which means you get to experience the drug and see if it’s even worthwhile. And then the company will work with your insurance and try writing preauthorization letters and letters of appeal to see if we can get you on the drug.Hopefully, I’m assuming, when insurance companies start seeing how much it prevents patients from going to the ER, how much it prevents patients coming to doctors again and again for headaches and it helps with their migraine, this will soon be on most commercial plans. Other similar medications to come: There are three more in the pipeline and hopefully we’ll have some of those by the end of the year. There is one more that is presumed to come next year, hopefully.Are we close to a cure for migraine: No. We can improve the quality of life with these medications to the point where patients either don’t have that many headaches or when they have a headache, they’re able to break it pretty quickly so they can go back to what they were doing. The problem is that there is no real path of physiology of migraine.Migraine can happen due to various reasons. There are several theories that we know, but there’s just one pathway that we know. However, with this new drug, we are a lot closer than we were a couple of years ago to finding a good, happy balance to someone having a migraine but still having a great quality of life. Sharelast_img read more