Vermont Guardian to cease publication

first_imgThe Vermont Guardian, which earlier this year became the state’s only exclusively online newspaper, will cease publication this month.The move comes three months after the Guardian dropped its print format as a way to cut costs and better reach its growing readership on the Internet. That move drew significantly more readers topping more than 8,000 readers per day (with more than 20,000 page views) and 150,000 readers per month.”The reason we are closing our doors is simple,” said Shay Totten, the paper’s co-founder, editor, and publisher.”While the move to online helped us bring our costs in line with our revenues, and to be more fleet-footed in how we respond to breaking news and analysis, I have been offered an opportunity that, for the benefit of my family, I cannot turn down and it means that the paper must cease publication at this time due to the enormous amount of time that I put into this publication every day.”This week’s issue will be the paper’s last, and will largely be comprised of a “best of” retrospective of some of the most important stories the paper published in its two-and-a-half year run, Totten said. The Guardian’s first weekly print edition hit the streets in September 2004, and its circulation topped 10,000 readers statewide.”We have rightly earned many accolades from readers, pundits, and our colleagues over the years, and everyone who worked with us as a staffer, a freelancer, intern, or volunteer should know they were part of something important and that has had an impact on events and issues that will far outlast its short life,” said Totten. “We were the first newspaper to put breaking news on its website, to offer online subscriptions to readers, and to take our entire news operation online. These are all great accomplishments, and I look forward to seeing what folks come up with next.”Totten will be the new editorial director of Chelsea Green Publishing in White River Junction. The job title encompasses the existing editor-in-chief role, and has been expanded to include the oversight and development of multimedia tools and online content.In the coming months, Chelsea Green plans to launch a new website, which will host much of the new content, and begin thinking of new ways for each authors book project to be more than simply a book, making each a way to help organize action around the core idea and purpose of the title.Founded in 1984, Chelsea Green Publishing Company is dedicated to the politics and practice of sustainability. During the past twenty-three years, Chelsea Green has published a wide range of titles from the political New York Times best seller, Don’t Think of an Elephant, to ecological classics like The Man Who Planted Trees. Its authors are on the cutting edge of politics, energy, agriculture, green building, economics, food politics, gardening, and religion.”It was a very difficult decision, but more than three years of long hours and low pay was, in the end, simply too much to bear for me and my family any more,” said Totten. “Still, I made this decision after a long discussion with my family who has supported me and the paper to the bitter end and with close friends, allies, and our investors. All agreed that the Guardian has much to be proud of, and it is time for me to move on.”The Guardian’s website will remain active indefinitely for subscribers to continue accessing the paper’s rich archives, and more news stories will be posted throughout this week and next to ensure the paper meets its obligations to its many subscribers and advertisers.”I hold out some hope that we can find someone to manage and run the website as a news organization,” said Totten.The paper’s other co-founder, Greg Guma, left the Guardian in early 2006 to take over as executive director of the Pacifica Foundation, which operates the Pacifica Radio Network.last_img read more

Kirk Gibson, Dodgers’ 1988 World series hero, diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error DETROIT — Kirk Gibson has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, he said Tuesday.The 1988 National League MVP was fired in September as manager of the Arizona Diamondbacks after four-plus seasons. He now calls Tigers games for Fox Sports Detroit, but Gibson had not been in the broadcast booth since opening day April 6 while undergoing tests.“I have faced many different obstacles in my life, and have always maintained a strong belief that no matter the circumstances, I could overcome those obstacles,” he said in a statement through the network. “While this diagnosis poses a new kind of challenge for me, I intend to stay true to my beliefs. With the support of my family and friends, I will meet this challenge with the same determination and unwavering intensity that I have displayed in all of my endeavors in life. I look forward to being back at the ballpark as soon as possible.”The 57-year-old Gibson had one of the most memorable moments in baseball history with his limping, pinch-hit home run in the ninth inning of Game 1 of the 1988 World Series for the Dodgers. He also won a championship in 1984 with the Tigers, where he played 12 of his 17 major league seasons.last_img read more

Sumner County Toy Run raises astonishing $3,480 for Operation Holiday

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comment (1) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down Jim · 345 weeks ago Can you I’d the folks on your picture Report Reply 0 replies · active 345 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Sumner Toy Run makes generous donation to Operation Holiday.by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The Sumner County Toy Run organizers raised an astonishing $3,480 in 2013 which was recently given to the Noon Hour Lions Club in Wellington for Operation Holiday.The Toy Run is a ride by motorcyclists from Belle Plaine to Wellington which started 23 years ago by a group of motorcycle riders who wanted to help Operation Holiday provide more Christmas joy for the children of Sumner County. The Toy Run organizers were asking for donations from local businesses including all the chili fixings, cash, products and gift certificates to be used the day of the event for the chili feed and auction.The Toy Run started at Randy Ray’s Auction house in Belle Plaine riding to the end at the local VFW in Wellington.“We have had as few as five riders and as many as 130 depending on the weather,” said Julie Crow, of Julie’s Passtime Bar. “Two years ago we thought we could do more”On top of the Toy Run, the group started having a Sumner County Classic Car Show on Washington Street in front of Julie’s Passtime Bar about two years ago.“We are still growing and planning to continue this tradition,” Crow said.Next year’s car show is tentatively set for June 21, 2014.More plans are in the works for the Toy Run organizers. They are now going to have a third event to support on March 29, 2014 called the “Scavenger Hunt.”A person will be part of a team of at least six members with a maximum of 12. People will pick up a list and instructions by 1 p.m. at Julie’s Passtime Bar and will have several specified items to pick up at designated places with many other items to collect.There will be prizes awarded at the end. here will be $20 entry fee per member.“Spread the word, it will be fun,” Crow said. “With all of these events, I do have help but we can always use more people to help. ”If interested are interested please contact Crow at 399-8618.last_img read more