Snow peas implicated in cyclosporiasis outbreak for first time

first_imgSep 24, 2004 (CIDRAP News)—Raw snow peas have been linked to an outbreak of cyclosporiasis in Pennsylvania that may have sickened almost 100 people, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has announced.A Sep 17 early-release Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) article said CDC and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials are working with the Guatemalan government to determine the source of the Guatemalan-grown snow peas and how the produce became contaminated.Pennsylvania public health officials noted about 50 potential cases of cyclosporiasis among residents, staff, and volunteers affiliated with a residential facility, MMWR said. Illnesses began in early June and lasted through early July.Of 349 people with connections to the facility, 96 had symptoms including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, and aches starting within 1 to 14 days of attending one of five special events there. Forty Cyclospora cayetanensis infections were laboratory-confirmed; the other 56 cases were termed probable C cayetanensis.C cayetanensis is a one-celled parasite. Cyclosporiasis can occur when people ingest food or water contaminated with infected stool, the CDC said.Investigation quickly focused on determining what foods had been served at five special events that took place at the facility in May and June, MMWR reported. Pasta salad containing snow peas was linked to the outbreak.All of the snow peas used by the facility came from one container, which was purchased on May 21 and refrigerated until the last batch of salad was made on Jun 22, when the remaining peas were discarded. No peas were available for testing, but investigators said the snow peas were the only salad ingredient that meet criteria necessary to have caused the outbreak, according to MMWR. Those criteria were: being in all three batches of the salad served at the five events, being from the same lot, and being served only at those five events.The outbreak marks the first instance of the parasitic disease implicating snow peas. Other culprits have included raspberries, basil, and mesclun lettuce from various countries.The largest outbreak of cyclosporiasis, affecting more than 1,400 people in North America, took place in 1996, according to “Epidemiologic studies of Cyclospora cayetanensis in Guatemala,” published in the November-December 1999 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases. Raspberries were associated with the outbreak, prompting water-quality and sanitary-practice improvements on berry farms.Guatemalan raspberries have since been implicated in other outbreaks, including a wedding in 2000 in Philadelphia, Pa. Fifty-four people fell ill after eating the wedding cake, which contained raspberries found to contain Cyclospora, according to an August 2002 article in Emerging Infectious Diseases.CDC. Outbreak of cyclosporiasis associated with snow peas—Pennsylvania, 2004. MMWR Sep 24;53(37):876-8 (posted online Sep 17) [Full text]See also:1999 Emerging Infectious Diseases articlehttp://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol5no6/bern.htm2002 Emerging Infectious Diseases articlehttp://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol8no8/02-0012.htmlast_img read more

A generation of buyers has never seen RBA raise rates – and that’s likely to continue for a while yet

first_imgNew homeowners in the past seven years have never seen a rate hike.A GENERATION of homebuyers has never experienced a rate hike, and their luck is likely to continue for a while yet, according to latest predictions.RateCity money editor Sally Tindall said it had now been a whopping seven years since the Reserve Bank last raised interest rates with 21 of 23 indicators suggesting that to continue to be the case come Tuesday’s monetary policy meeting.“It’s incredible to think there is a now a large number of first home buyers who’ve never experienced a rate hike. Seven years is a long time between increases,” she said.The RBA is expected to keep the cash rate at 1.5 per cent when it meets on Tuesday. Picture: AAP Image/Dean Lewins.RateCity analysis of 23 leading economic indicators found that 21 of them pointed to the RBA leaving the official cash rate at a record low of 1.5 per cent, where it has been since August last year.“Lower than expected inflation figures and wage growth stalling at just 1.9 per cent provide an argument for the Reserve to cut rates, but that’s unlikely.“The RBA will also be concerned Australia’s household debt-to-income level increased from 19.0 per cent to a record 193.7 per cent in the last quarter – a worrying trend that leaves them in a difficult position.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus23 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market23 hours agoWHAT A MILLION-DOLLAR MAKEOVER GETS YOU IN BRISBANEHOUSE SOLD FOR LESS THAN COST OF UNITFIVE WAYS TO PUT YOUR EQUITY TO WORK FOR YOURBA has expressed concern over the household debt-to-income ratio hitting a record 193.7 per cent. Picture: Getty Images.“If they hike rates, they will risk sending thousands of Australians into financial hardship. Conversely, if they lower rates, it will encourage others to take on more debt. In short, its hands are tied until wages growth, and the broader economy, strengthen.“Until then, homeowners can rest easy in the knowledge that their mortgage repayments won’t be increasing anytime soon.”The RBA board meets for the monthly monetary policy meeting on Tuesday with their decision on whether or not to move on rates to be announced at 1pm.Unemployment fell from 5.6 to 5.5 per cent last month but significantly more movement was needed to trigger a rate rise.FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOKFREE: GET THE COURIER-MAIL’S REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO INBOXlast_img read more