PNG men’s basketball rearing to go

first_imgThe crowd is building slowly with American Samoa supporters out with their flags.It’s expected to be a close match with PNG ranked seventh while American Samoa never made the top eight at the last Games.PNG so far has lost to New Caledonia 74-77 last night.In previous results today, Guam defeated Samoa 79-72 while Solomon Islands lost to Tahiti 76-35.last_img

ScienceShot: Predicting Heat Waves

first_imgScientists have discovered a possible early warning sign of heat waves: When a halo of five strong and persistent high-pressure systems crowd the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (see image; high pressure areas outlined in red, low pressure in blue), the chances of a heat wave striking the continental United States are up to four times higher than average, the researchers report today in Nature Geoscience. The team used a worldwide climate model that incorporated normal month-to-month variations in sea surface temperatures and sea ice coverage, among other climate factors, to simulate 12,000 years’ worth of weather. During the summer months of that period, and within an area roughly equivalent to the continental United States, there were more than 5900 heat wave events, including a total of more than 16,000 heat wave days (defined as days when the high temperature reached the top 2.5% of readings for that date across 10% or more of the continental United States). For the 2300 isolated heat waves (ones that had no heat wave days in the preceding 3 weeks) that occurred during the simulation, a higher-than-normal proportion were heralded by the halo of high-pressure systems. The distinctive weather pattern didn’t precede all heat waves, so other factors are also at play, the researchers note. Also, the occasional halo of high-pressure systems doesn’t seem to be linked to abnormally high temperatures in the tropics or to any particular climate cycle, such as El Niño. Instead, the researchers say, the configuration seems to be the result of natural variations in the atmosphere’s weather patterns. Nevertheless, the new finding provides hope that scientists can recognize 2 to 3 weeks in advance the conditions that make deadly heat waves more likely, an early warning substantially beyond the 10-day forecasts meteorologists typically muster.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Longer Looks Lithium In The Water Controlling Cancer Recovering From Brain Injury

first_imgEach week, KHN’s Shefali Luthra finds interesting reads from around the Web.The New Yorker: Is It Possible To Control Cancer Without Killing It?There are many kinds of cancer, but treatments have typically combatted them in one way only: by attempting to destroy the cancerous cells. Surgery aims to remove the entire growth from the body; chemotherapy drugs are toxic to the cancer cells; radiation generates toxic molecules that break up the cancer cells’ DNA and proteins, causing their demise. A more recent approach, immunotherapy, coöpts the body’s immune system into attacking and eradicating the tumor. The Agios drug, instead of killing the leukemic cells—immature blood cells gone haywire—coaxes them into maturing into functioning blood cells. … at least some cancer cells might be redeemable: they still carry their original programming and can be pressed back onto a pathway to health (Dr. Jerome Groopman, 9/15).Modern Healthcare: ACA Open Enrollment For 2015 Causing Anxiety For Plans, ProvidersDuring the 2014 open enrollment for Obamacare coverage, Mary Denson, 21, a student at Columbia (Mo.) College, qualified for a federal premium subsidy that reduced her premium contribution for buying health insurance to less than $20 a month. But she fears that when she renews her coverage for 2015, she won’t have enough income from her nanny job to reach the subsidy income threshold of 100% of the federal poverty level and continue qualifying for premium tax credits. …. The sole focus during the 2014 open enrollment period was on signing up as many people like Denson as possible in exchange and off-exchange individual-market plans. But when the three-month open enrollment period for the second year … opens on Nov. 15, the task for health plans, insurance brokers and thousands of enrollment workers at hospitals, clinics and community organizations will be more complex (Paul Demko, 9/13).The Washington Post: After Traumatic Brain Injury, A Young Man’s Astounding RecoveryOn Nov. 8, 2012, my son Dylan — two months into his junior year at Tufts University — was struck by a car in a crosswalk. His head punched a hole through the car’s windshield, and he suffered a traumatic brain injury so severe that doctors initially warned he might be permanently disabled. … his luck changed in time to save his life. Because the accident occurred at 8:30 p.m. rather than in the middle of Boston’s rush hour, he was brought to a hospital within a half hour — and not just any hospital. It was Massachusetts General, … The speed of triage was impressive, but the results of that scan were devastating. Dylan’s brain injury was rotational, meaning hisFortunately, Dylan’s neocortex, the brain’s seat of higher-level processing, was mostly uninjured. And he had one other thing going for him, doctors said: his youth (Rebecca Hubert Williams, 9/15).The New York Times: Should We All Take A Little Bit Of Lithium?Lithium is a naturally occurring element, not a molecule like most medications, and it is present in the United States, depending on the geographic area, [in water] at concentrations that can range widely, from undetectable to around .170 milligrams per liter. This amount is less than a thousandth of the minimum daily dose given for bipolar disorders and for depression that doesn’t respond to antidepressants. … Evidence is slowly accumulating that relatively tiny doses of lithium can have beneficial effects. They appear to decrease suicide rates significantly and may even promote brain health and improve mood (Anna Fels, 9/13). New York Magazine: My Year As An Abortion DoulaWomen have historically supported other women through the process of childbirth, so the work of birth doulas is nothing new. But when birth doulas Lauren Mitchell and Mary Mahoney sought to bring those support practices into abortion clinics, they met immediate resistance. “To imply that women getting abortions would need something as touchy-feely as support was not accepted,” Mitchell explains. Some birth doulas were reluctant to consider the needs of women terminating pregnancies as at all similar to their patients carrying them to term. And many pro-choice doulas, doctors, and nonprofits were unwilling to acknowledge how difficult and painful many women find abortion (Alex Ronan, 9/14).Pacific Standard: Gambling With America’s Health A debate over the social and health costs of legal gambling has largely been sidelined even as availability has expanded dramatically in the last 25 years. This is not because of a lack of merit, say experts and activists, but because of the political power of the gambling industry. They allege that the industry has employed tactics in the same spirit as those of tobacco companies, which for many years misled consumers about the addictive properties of cigarettes and advertised to young people and other vulnerable consumers. According to Les Bernal, the national director of Stop Predatory Gambling, a Washington, D.C.-based non-profit, “This is one of the biggest public health issues in America today that no one has been paying attention to” (Elaine Meyer, 9/15).Aeon Magazine: How Mathematics Can Make Epidemics HistoryWhen Ronald Ross tipped over the water tank outside his bungalow in Bangalore, it began a lifelong battle against mosquitoes. It was 1883 and Ross, only two years out of medical school, was the British Army’s new garrison surgeon. Overall, he was happy with the posting – he considered the city, with its sun, gardens and villas, to be the best in southern India. He was less enthusiastic about the mosquitoes. Having arrived to find his room filled with the sound of buzzing wings, he decided to hunt down and destroy their breeding ground in pools of stagnant tank water. … The longer Ross spent in the region, the more he began to suspect that those mosquitoes transmitted malaria …. Ross’s work, which won him a Nobel Prize in 1902 and a knighthood in 1911, set the stage for a new mathematical way of thinking about disease outbreaks from bubonic plague to influenza (Adam Kucharski, 9/16).  Longer Looks: Lithium In The Water; Controlling Cancer; Recovering From Brain Injury This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more