Sir Alex: QPR’s dismay understandable, but Derry had to go

first_imgManchester United boss Sir Alex Ferguson said he understood QPR’s frustration after their 2-0 defeat at Old Trafford.Rangers manager Mark Hughes was angered by the decision of referee Lee Mason to award a penalty against the visitors and send off Shaun Derry following a challenge on Ashley Young.But although Ferguson conceded that Young was in an offside position, he insisted his player did not dive to earn a spot-kick and therefore Derry had to be dismissed.“Ashley was a yard offside so I can understand Mark [Hughes] being angry and disappointed at that. You see these kinds of decisions every week though,” he said.“The boy’s just got a little tug on Young, not a great deal but enough to get us the penalty. And unfortunately he was the last defender and had to be sent off.“The sending-off didn’t help us at all. I was actually more confident before that in terms of the speed of our play and the movement of the team which was very good.”Click here for our Man Utd v QPR quizSee also: United helped by officials as they see off 10-man RangersHughes urges QPR to recreate spirit of ’92Mixed news for QPR ahead of Man Utd clashlast_img read more

Bank Login-Stealing Botnet Found Hiding in Amazon Cloud

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market jolie odell We’ve all heard security nerds complain about the vulnerabilities of cloud computing; here’s the news they’ve been waiting for.Black-hat hackers got into an unnamed website hosted on Amazon’s servers then proceeded to install an illegal command and control infrastructure. Named America’s number one most wanted botnet, Zeus was discovered on Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) by security researchers yesterday.The Zeus Trojan is a keylogger designed to steal data such as login credentials, account numbers and credit card information. It creates fake HTML forms on banking login pages to allow hackers to steal user data. This particular botnet has been linked to around $100 million in bank fraud in 2009.Although we don’t yet have details on exactly how the website in question was hacked, we have learned that the software has been removed from the Amazon cloud. This incident is the first example of malware being found on AWS’ infrastructure.As we were warned by black hats in April this year, cloud computing carries certain risks and opportunities for exploitation. Our own Sarah Perez wrote:In another part of the Sensepost presentation, they looked specifically at vulnerabilities of Amazon’s Web Services. To start off, they detailed the process involved in setting up a new instance on EC2… While Amazon has provided 47 machine images they built themselves, the remaining 2721 images were build by other EC2 users. Can you really believe that all of these images were built securely? Basically, the template directory is just a big archive of user-generated content. And you know what user-gen content is like… risky.As John Pescatore told the Financial Times, “The security of these cloud-based infrastructure services is like Windows in 1999. It’s being widely used and nothing tremendously bad has happened yet. But it’s just in early stages of getting exposed to the Internet, and you know bad things are coming.”Will hackers continue to employ web services to carry out their schemes in 2010? Twitter, Facebook, Google Apps, and now Amazon Web Services have all been used for evil this year. How can websites, corporations, and end users be smarter about online security to avoid personal and financial loss next year? Let us know what you think in the comments. Tags:#cloud computing#NYT#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

CARPHA Observes World AIDS Day

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TrinidadandTobago, December 1, 2017 –   The Caribbean remains the sub-region with the second highest estimated adult HIV prevalence (1.3% Adults 15-49 years, 2016[1]).   Available data indicates that new infections in the Caribbean appear to be stabilizing (0.47/1,000 population, 20161), and AIDS deaths are decreasing.   Nevertheless, challenges remain, and key populations such as female sex workers, transgender persons, men who have sex with men and young persons, continue to be disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic.CARPHA Executive Director, Dr. C. James Hospedales said,  “While high incidences of HIV persist among key populations, significant gains have been made in prevention in the Region.   Six CARPHA Member States (CMS) have been recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the dual elimination of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV and Syphilis.”The theme for World AIDS Day 2017 is Everybody Counts.   End AIDS.   Observed every year on December 1st, World AIDS Day calls for increased awareness, education and greater understanding of HIV as a global public health issue.    To end HIV transmission, the focus should be on HIV combination prevention, early detection and access to antiretroviral treatment.CARPHA has spent the last three years identifying activities that focus on reducing the impact of HIV/AIDS on key populations (KP) by identifying and addressing the barriers that KPs living with HIV must overcome to obtain adequate health care.Dr Cheryl Jones, Behavioural Scientist at CARPHA explains, “The approach for addressing this issue is multifaceted and includes building capacity and a detailed understanding of the needs of KPs among health educators, health care service providers and communities of KPs.   The initial focus was to gain input from health promotion specialists in CMS on the development of a regional behavioural sciences agenda that seeks to reduce the impact of HIV/AIDS and all related public health concerns in the region.   Secondly, clinicians from five CMS participated in a workshop that sought to facilitate clinician centered behaviour change along the HIV Cascade of Care.   Thirdly, the most recent and, perhaps, most telling phase has been building the capacity of civil society organizations (CSO) by providing technical support in the development of a technical brief to be delivered to ministries of health.”It was noted that public health professionals do not always leverage KP communities’ ability to improve their health, in addition, the CSOs can reach KPs that may regard ministries and other non-governmental agencies as ‘unsafe’ or intimidating. Building the capacity of CSOs in developing technical briefs was seen as an important initiative as CSOs can be very strong representatives, allies and gatekeepers for KPs.   When their ability to collect and analyze data/information for the development of technical papers that support the needs of their communities is enhanced, there is an increased potential for the collection of evidence-based information to inform policy and advocacy.“We have made great strides and need to continue combining our efforts if we want to End AIDS,” stated Dr. Hospedales.    “It is therefore critical for us to have a multisectoral commitment, close collaboration with communities, and investment in sustainable prevention to end AIDS.   By strengthening participation and working together we can end this epidemic.”Let us all play a greater role in advocacy, let us fight against stigma and discrimination, and support those affected and prevent others from being infected. We all count.   Let us End AIDS.Press Release: CARPHA Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Afghan avalanches death toll tops 100

first_imgAn Afghan man walks along a path under snow-laden trees in Kabul on 5 February, 2017. Photo: AFPMore than a 100 people have been killed in a series of avalanches triggered by days of heavy snowfall around Afghanistan, including 50 in one village, officials said Sunday, warning the death toll could rise still further.The avalanches struck after three days of heavy snow, which has destroyed scores of homes and blocked roads mainly in central and northeastern provinces, making it difficult for rescue workers to reach the stricken villages.The bulk of the deaths however occurred in remote Nuristan province, where at least 50 people were killed in a single village, Mohammad Omar Mohammadi a spokesman for the ministry of natural disaster told AFP.“Avalanches have buried two entire villages in Bargmatal district, 50 bodies were recovered from one village while rescuers are trying to reach the other village,” said the spokesman.Elsewhere 54 people were killed in northern and central Afghan provinces, where officials said massive avalanches destroyed 168 houses and killed hundreds of cattle.Bad weather and deep snow had hampered efforts of rescue workers to reach the isolated villages, raising fears the toll could rise sharply, according to officials.In Badakhshan province also in the northeast of the country, at least 18 people, including three women and two children, were killed when avalanches struck their houses overnight, said provincial spokesman Naweed Frotan.“Several dozens are still trapped, we are trying to rescue them,” he said, adding that many roads were still blocked.Five people were killed by avalanches in the Balkhab district of Sari Pul province in northern Afghanistan and at least 70 people trapped under the snow were being rescued, said provincial spokesman Zabiullah Amani.“The roads to Balkhab are still blocked and we are trying to open them,” he said.Freezing weather killed at least two people and over 100 animals in the western province of Badghis.In Parwan province just north of Kabul, the spokesman for governor Wahid Sediqqi said 16 people died.The government declared Sunday, a normal working day in Afghanistan, to be a public holiday to deter non-essential travel and ensure schools were closed.Heavy snowfall -Unusually, snow even fell in the southern province of Kandahar.Neighbouring Pakistan was also hit by severe weather, with at least 13 people killed in the northwest by avalanches or heavy rain.An avalanche smashed into eight homes in the village of Shershal in Chitral district, killing nine people including four women and four children.The region has been hit by heavy snowfall that is four feet (1.2 metres) deep in some places.Six people who had been trapped beneath the snow were rescued.A separate avalanche killed a soldier at a border checkpoint in Chitral district, a military statement said, while six more soldiers were injured.Chitral district mayor Maghfriat Shah said the city’s airport was closed because of the weather.The region’s electricity supply was also disrupted after the main power line was damaged.In the Khyber tribal district on the Afghan border in the northwest, three infant girls were killed and two women injured when the roof of their house collapsed in heavy rain.Deadly avalanches are common in Afghanistan’s mountainous areas in winter and rescue efforts are frequently hampered by lack of equipment.Despite billions of dollars in international aid after the ousting of the Taliban government in 2001, Afghanistan remains among the world’s poorest nations.Last month heavy snowfall and freezing weather killed 27 children, all under the age of five, in Jawzjan province in northern Afghanistan.last_img read more

3 DU teachers 21students get Deans Award

first_imgA  total of 21 students of various departments under the Faculty of Earth and Environmental Sciences of Dhaka University (DU) have been awarded ‘Dean’s Award’ for their outstanding academic results in BS (Hons) examinations of 2015, 2016 and 2017.Besides, 3 teachers of the Faculty of Earth and Environmental Sciences have received Dean’s Award for research works.DU vice-chancellor Akhtaruzzaman handed over the awards to the awardees as the chief guest at a function held at Nabab Nawab Ali Chowdhury Senate Bhaban of the university on Thursday .Dean of the Faculty of Earth and Environmental Sciences ASM Maksud Kamal presided over the function while pro-vice chancellor (Administration) Muhammad Samad and treasurer professor Kamal Uddin addressed it as special guests.The teachers who received the award are professor Kazi MatinUddin Ahmed (Geology), professor Kawser Ahmed (Oceanography) and lecturer Yousuf Gazi (Geology).The students who received the awards are- Zannatul Ferdous, Naznin Bintey Hayder, NishatTasnim Kakon and Dola Dutta (Geography and Environment), Mahmud Al Noor Tushar, AfrozaParvin, Tamanna Meheran Shemu, SumiyaSadeak, Sharaf Anika Hoque, Farjana Zareen Maria, FatematuzZohora Nishi and Md. Tariqul Islam (Geology), Nazma Ahmed, Shamima Ferdousi Sifa, Ariful Islam, Tanzim Hayat, Nawar Wadud Khan, Falguni Sarkar, Tanzeem Hossain, SumaiyaTabassum and Ayesha Islam (Disaster Science and Management). read more