George Lois Slams Esquires EInk Cover

first_imgGeorge Lois, Esquire’s art director from 1962 to 1972, took a no holds barred approach to design, producing some of the most iconic covers in the history of magazines. Lois takes the same approach to interviews, telling AdAge media reporter Nat Ives how he was “embarrassed” by Esquire’s battery-powered e-ink cover, a “silly gimmick” that “cost a quarter of a million dollars, I’m told.” (Esquire’s issue touted the cover line, “The 21st Century Begins Now” with, as Lois described, “Mickey Mouse lights clicking on and off.”)Since April, the MOMA has been hosting a collection of Lois’ Esquire cover designs. During this interview, Lois said: “great covers need to have a great idea behind them.” Of Esquire’s cover, he said: “That wasn’t great; it was ridiculous.” “When will they learn?” Lois said of Esquire. “Oh lord, how long will it take for them to learn.”last_img read more

A Perfect Circle On Influences Collaboration Building Eat The Elephant

first_img Twitter A Perfect Circle Talk Building ‘Eat The Elephant’ perfect-circle-influences-collaboration-building-eat-elephant News NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Dec 25, 2018 – 7:27 am A Perfect Circle Talk ‘Eat The Elephant’ A Perfect Circle On Influences, Collaboration & Building ‘Eat The Elephant’ The influential rock group stopped by the GRAMMY Museum to discuss the impetus for their new music, their early influences and the creative process behind their big 2018 returnNate HertweckGRAMMYs Dec 25, 2018 – 7:30 am A Perfect Circleis the kind of band fans wait with bated breath to hear new music from, no matter how long they are away. In the case of Eat The Elephant, the band’s fourth album, the wait was a full 14 years. Still, the new material was met with much anticipation, a testament to the art. Email Back in October, we premiered a video for the title track from the album-length film the band made for Eat The Elephant. In the song, lead singer and songwriter Maynard James Keenan’s stark, haunting vocals creek and soar over lead composer and guitarist Billy Howerdel’s dynamic backdrop. During a recent visit to the GRAMMY Museum in Los Angeles,as Keenan and Howerdel shared how they came to revisit the project after all these years away.”I think it was just time,” said Keenan. “I was really busy with Puscifer for quite a while. Then I was gonna get back into doing some Tool music, and they weren’t ready, so I was like [to Howerdel], “Hey, what’s up?”The time passed since their previous album, 2004’s Emotive, manifests itself on Eat The Elephant in the space within and around its songs, creating a new sonic environment from the band’s previous work. This had everything to do with how the songs’ foundations were built.”A lot of times on this record we had the song kind of almost complete, and then he put the vocals on top. It was pretty amazing,” explained Howerdel. “Maynard had a lot more input into the music this time, just to, you know, try to some things, because he knew where he was gonna go vocally. He wasn’t in the room when I was working on the music, so we’d kind of lightly steer in that direction. And I think it worked out because he just had something in mind and then was able to throw the solid final performance on top of it.”When it comes to architecting a vocal, Keenan does it like no one else. The genesis of his genius instincts begin with responding to the music, as he revealed during the conversation. “First and foremost, it’s a reaction to the melodies and structures and time signatures that the group of musicians are presenting me, whether it’s Mat Mitchell, or Billy, or Tool,” he said. “It’s all a reaction melodically to those rhythms, constructing it in a way that feels like an actual conversation. And I of course react better when they’re not in 4/4. I don’t speak in 4/4.””Then [I] figure out where that emotion is going, and then just look at your life experiences, what you’re experiencing at the moment, and attach a set of words or a circumstance to that set of rhythms and melodies to see if it opens up a whole story, because you know, human interaction, human experience from birth to death, there’s an infinite number of flavors and colors and bandwidths and emotions that come with those experiences.”Keenan also named an intriguing roster of early influences, providing a glimpse into his stylistic DNA. His early exposure to everything from Roberta Flack to Black Sabbath to Joni Mitchell led to an appreciation of Minor Threat, Killing Joke, Swans and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, which in turn led him to Gillian Welch and PJ Harvey.”To me, there’s a sadness that’s captivating in that writing that’s essential,” Keenan says of Welch, Harvey and his tastes as they’ve evolved over the course of his life.A Perfect Circle has evolved, too. At its core, it’s a dynamic collaboration, which means Keenan and Howerdel cannot say what will come next.”It’s a marriage of sorts,” says Howerdel. “You have to make this more than just the sum of its parts, more than the sum of the two of us. That comes from the unknown of collaboration… Having collaboration is the magic of never knowing what’s coming next.”A Perfect Circle’s Billy Howerdel On New Music, Touring Again & MoreRead more Facebook last_img read more

More trouble for Karnataka Congress as senior leader Ramalinga Reddy lashes out

first_img“I am a seven-time MLA but they are neglecting me. This is also the case for senior leaders like HK Patil, Roshan Baig and others,” read his tweet expressing anger over the unfair induction of new members by neglecting the seniors.In his tweet, Reddy said that neglecting the senior Congressmen in the government and the lack of organisational foresight of some ministers resulted in the humiliating defeat of the party. He said that the main reason for this poor performance is not listening to the advice of the party seniors and the performance of some ministers.He urged the Congress leadership to set things right. “In order to face the challenging days ahead, the party and the government must address the fact that seniors have been neglected. If the situation continues like this, it’ll be difficult for senior leaders to be in the party”, he said.Reddy further suggested that the ministers who failed to deliver in the Lok Sabha elections should be given an inferior rank in the party and the senior members should be given positions in the government. Ramalinga ReddyTwitter [Representational Image]The troubles of the Congress in Karnataka don’t seem to end after the party’s dismal performance in the Lok Sabha elections. Even as the party top brass is fighting to keep the coalaition government alive, senior leader Ramalinga Reddy has revolted against the leadership, blaming them for the awful show in elections.Reddy wrote an open letter to the Congress party from his Twitter handle on Monday, giving his version of the events that led to the defeat of the Congress. The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) won 25 out of 28 parliamentary seats in the state.A former minister in the Siddaramiah-led government, Reddy was not given a cabinet position in the Congress-JD(S) coalition government. He expressed his disdain over the alliance leaders’ decision to go for a cabinet expansion to induct R Shankar and H Nagesh as part of a plan to keep the BJP at bay and help the government survive. last_img read more

UK to ban sale of diesel and petrol cars from 2040

first_imgIBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:01/0:55Loaded: 0%0:01Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-0:54?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Close The announcement comes as part of the governments £3bn ($3.9bn) clean air strategy. Air pollution is thought to shorten the lives of around 40,000 people per year.center_img UK to ban sale of diesel and petrol cars from 2040last_img read more

Do You Need an App for That Take This Quiz to Find

first_img 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now » With 80 percent of the US population owning a smartphone, I suspect you have thought about whether you need your own mobile application for your business and beyond. Yet, less than one third of businesses have a mobile application and 90 percent of websites are not mobile optimized. The average cost to develop a mobile app ranges from $38,000 per platform on the low end, to $270,000 on the high end and can easily climb to $500,000 or higher. The actual cost can vary widely and depends on a lot of factors from which operating system you need to be on, the functionality you need, and the design elements.  And, it’s not just building an application – which on average takes more than seven months – but you need to maintain it to make sure it works as the operating systems evolve.So, how do you decide whether the investment is worth it?  I often get asked this question.  So at Yapp, we developed this quiz to help you decide whether you really need a custom app for that, or whether a self-service platform or mobile website will do. Take the Quiz Now.Close Related: 3 Strategies for Winning In the Hyper-Competitive Market for Apps Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global March 6, 2015last_img read more