In Your Neighbourhood

first_imgShelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Six-a-side football titleWaterford Primary captured the Institute of Sports (INSPORTS)/Chubby Portmore Primary Football League with a 4-2 penalty kicks win over arch-rivals Naggo Head Primary in an exciting final at the Cedar Grove Sports Complex last Thursday.The keenly contested match watched by a lively crowd went down to the wire as a penalty shoot-out decided the winners after both teams were deadlocked after regulation and extra time. Rochede Rose, Jevin Parkinson, Demario Knight, Josheme Nelson scored the penalties for Waterford.At the end of the match Ian Andrews, the Administrative Director of INSPORTS handed over the championship trophy to Waterford Primary.Portsmouth Primary wins againDefending champions Portsmouth defeated Independence City 18-7 to retain their title in the final of the INSPORTS Portmore Primary School Netball League at the Ascot High School’s court last Monday.Independence City were no match for the champions with centre Sanaca Knight, who was later named the most valuable player during the month-long competition, dominating play from mid-court.In addition to lifting the coveted trophy, Portsmouth were also named the most disciplined team to go along with the dress parade which they won on the opening day of the competition on November 5.Winning coach Sheryl Wignall was named top coach for guiding Portsmouth to victory.Meanwhile, Greater Portmore defeated Naggo Head 15-10 in the play-off for third place, while Independence City received an award for being the most improved team this year.Cedar Grove blank SouthboroughCedar Grove Estate FC blanked Southborough 3-0 to register their first win of the season from two games, as action continued in the York Pharmacy-sponsored Portmore Division Two Football League last Sunday.Chase Singh, Steven Squire and Chrisna Wright scored for Cedar Grove who now have four points. Leaders Braeton United (six points) also had a similar 3-0 win over Daytona. In another game, Cumberland and Racing United drew 2-2. Cedar Grove will next be in action when they host Daytona at their Sports Complex this afternoon at 3 p.m. Tomorrow at the Racing field, Edgewater take on Cumberland at 1 p.m. and at 3 p.m. Racing United tackle Waterford.Dunbeholden drub Watson GroveDunbeholden sent Watson Grove crashing out of the FLOW-sponsored St Catherine FA Lincoln “Happy” Sutherland Senior KO Football Competition with a big 5-0 win at the Dunbeholden field last Saturday.In other games, Marcus Garvey United hammered Travellers 4-0; Christian Pen whipped Hellshire United 4-1; Bodles booted McCook’s Pen 2-0; G.C. Foster clipped Windsor Lion 2-1; Royal Lakes eliminated East Portmore Portals 2-1; Tredegar Park beat Federal United 1-0; Portsmouth defeated Dela Vega City 1-0; Naggo Head nipped Rodwood 1-0 whil, New Raiders advanced 4-2 on penalties over Spanish Town Police Youth Club after a 1-1 regulation and extra-time scoreline.Westchester ‘A’ rich form continuesWestchester ‘A’ went on another goal scoring spree as they trounced Pro Santos B 27-8 in action from the South East St Catherine Netball League last Saturday.Also on Saturday, Express All Stars steam-rolled Passagefort Strikers 22-12; Pro-Santos A edged Progressive Strikers 14-12. In games played last Sunday Westchester ‘A’ battled past Express All Stars 25-20 in a keenly contested game, while, Pro Santos B spanked Passagefort Strikers 25-8.Today’s games: Mega Angels vs Express All Stars; Westchester vs Progressive Strikers and Pro-Santos ‘A’ vs Passagefort Strikers.Tomorrow’s games: Mega Angels vs Westchester; Pro-Santos ‘A’ vs Pro-Santos ‘B’ ; Progressive Strikers vs Express All Stars. The league which is in its first season is a collaborative effort between the Social Development Commission (SDC), and Colin Fagan, the Member of Parliament for South East St Catherine. quarter-finals todayFour quarter-final games in the third annual Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Six-a-side Football Competition will be played today in Waterhouse. The games were scheduled for last weekend but were postponed due to a water-logged field.At 12:30 p.m. Caribbean Palms and Varma Rangers will meet in a 20-minute qualifying play-off game, and the winners will join the six zone winners and Youths United, in the quarter finals. At 1 p.m., Miles play Choppaz; 2 p.m. Trendsetters face Eurotrend; 3 p.m: Darkside play Youths United or Caribbean Palms; and at 4 p.m Varma Rangers or Youths United play Moscow.The semi-finals will be played tomorrow while the final and third place play-off games are tentatively scheduled for next Saturday, December 12.Digicel, for whom Fraser-Pryce is an ambassador, is the title sponsor, while GraceKennedy, Wisynco, through their product Wata, Tank-Weld Metals, Sagicor Bank, and National Commercial Bank Foundation are the other sponsors.Waterford liftslast_img read more

Tony Becca: ICC chairman says no to Big Three

first_img SECRETLY TALKED ABOUT BULLYING Remember, the takeover, as it was reported, was secretly talked about privately for some time before it became public, and when it came out and was met with opposition, the deals followed. The deals included plans for more Test matches and more money for the smaller teams, and two countries, New Zealand and the West Indies, supported the move, while Zimbabwe, South Africa, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan were all against it. The promise of money won the day, with Pakistan, the last join in, saying it was difficult to stand alone. The pieces of silver may not now arrive, and some of the seven may be disappointed, including the West Indies, who gave away their right, the right to have a voice around the table, the right of equality, and the right for which their predecessors had fought for so long and so hard. Maybe the West Indies four-day professional league is not now guaranteed. The “Big Three” takeover, however, may now end up as nothing but a nightmare, or a bad dream, and as an embarrassment to India, England, and Australia, and also the West Indies. Two Wednesdays ago, it was reported by cricinfo.com that Manohar, the present and new chairman of the ICC, the man who is also the new president of Indian cricket, and the man who succeeded N Srinivasan, the former Indian Board president, had criticised “the imbalance of power within cricket’s governing body” because of the constitution revamp last year which gave the boards of India, England, Australia “greater authority and a larger share of the revenue”. That is interesting: an Indian against an Indian, and Manohar could make all the difference, especially as England, one of Srinivasan’s supporters, is now, it is reported, supporting Manohar. Speaking in Dubai a few days ago, Manohar called the revamp “bullying”, while saying that “there were several faults in the ICC that he hopes to rectify during his term as chairman, which ends in June 2016”. The faults include his disagreement with three countries “bullying” the ICC because of his belief that “an institution is bigger than an individual”, his disagreement with the ruling which says that “all the three countries will be automatically represented on all major committees”, and his disagreement with the fact that “all the financial and commercial aspects of the executive committee will be controlled by the representatives of the three countries.” According to Manohar, “You should have the best man, whether he comes from Zimbabwe, or the West Indies, or even from an associate or affiliate to work on a committee, that will protect the interest of the ICC.” Under the new governance structure, while the BCCI president became the chairman of the ICC, the Cricket Australia chairman heads the five-man executive committee, and the England and Wales Cricket Board president continues to head the ICC’s finance and commercial committees. In January 2014, a draft, done by representatives of India, England, and Australia, was presented to the ICC. The draft was a revenue-distribution document and it proposed, among other things, such as the return to the days of colonialism, that India, England, and Australia get a greater share of the ICC’s revenue. The new chairman of the ICC, the new president of the BCCI, and the man who follows the recent president of the BCCI and the chairman of the ICC into office, said that he does not agree with the revenue-sharing formula simply because, “while it is nice to say that India will get 22 per cent of the total revenue of ICC, you cannot make the poor poorer and the rich richer only because you have the clout”. Early last year, people like Eshan Mani of Pakistan, Malcolm Speed and Malcolm Grey of Australia, Saber Hossain Chowdhury of Bangladesh, Ali Bacher of South Africa, Mike Atherton of England, and Clive Lloyd of the West Indies saw the light and spoke out against it, loud and clear. Today, apart from England’s Giles Clarke, it is Shashank Manohar, the president of the all-powerful BCCI and the chairman of ICC himself, and his stance is strongly supported by members of the cricket fraternity, among them, Cricket South Africa, which has expressed “enormous delight”, and Sri Lanka Cricket, which calls Manohar “a sensible man”. The West Indies Cricket Board’s dream of collecting US$10 million from the International Cricket Council (ICC) over the next eight years, starting in January, appears to be over. This is based on the stance of the new president of the ICC, Shashank Manohar, who is also the new president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI). The money was supposed to be payable to the West Indies, New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan for their support of cricket’s “Big Three”, India, England, and Australia, in their move to take over the ICC early last year. In any language, that is a lot of money, and it is a lot of money for doing nothing, except, possibly, for supporting the “Big Three” in their bid for control of the ICC. That figure represents the money for the Test Match Fund promised to the full members of the ICC, with the exception of India, England, and Australia, and it was promised to them for their support in the much-maligned bid. Lest you have forgotten, the aim of the Test Match Fund was “to encourage Test match cricket” outside the “Big Three”. According to the ICC, with all but the “Big Three” suffering loses when they play each other, it was likely that the money would be used to offset these loses. Recently, for example, Sri Lanka lost some $648,000 while hosting the West Indies. In announcing the release of the funds recently, the ICC did not, however, make mention of the terms of usage, or how it would hold the Boards accountable to the objective of encouraging Test cricket. Maybe the ICC did not have to, or did not intend to, if the money was really for the Test Match Fund and was something of an attraction, something like a bribe, to get the seven to vote for the “Big Three”.last_img read more