A generation of buyers has never seen RBA raise rates – and that’s likely to continue for a while yet

first_imgNew homeowners in the past seven years have never seen a rate hike.A GENERATION of homebuyers has never experienced a rate hike, and their luck is likely to continue for a while yet, according to latest predictions.RateCity money editor Sally Tindall said it had now been a whopping seven years since the Reserve Bank last raised interest rates with 21 of 23 indicators suggesting that to continue to be the case come Tuesday’s monetary policy meeting.“It’s incredible to think there is a now a large number of first home buyers who’ve never experienced a rate hike. Seven years is a long time between increases,” she said.The RBA is expected to keep the cash rate at 1.5 per cent when it meets on Tuesday. Picture: AAP Image/Dean Lewins.RateCity analysis of 23 leading economic indicators found that 21 of them pointed to the RBA leaving the official cash rate at a record low of 1.5 per cent, where it has been since August last year.“Lower than expected inflation figures and wage growth stalling at just 1.9 per cent provide an argument for the Reserve to cut rates, but that’s unlikely.“The RBA will also be concerned Australia’s household debt-to-income level increased from 19.0 per cent to a record 193.7 per cent in the last quarter – a worrying trend that leaves them in a difficult position.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus23 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market23 hours agoWHAT A MILLION-DOLLAR MAKEOVER GETS YOU IN BRISBANEHOUSE SOLD FOR LESS THAN COST OF UNITFIVE WAYS TO PUT YOUR EQUITY TO WORK FOR YOURBA has expressed concern over the household debt-to-income ratio hitting a record 193.7 per cent. Picture: Getty Images.“If they hike rates, they will risk sending thousands of Australians into financial hardship. Conversely, if they lower rates, it will encourage others to take on more debt. In short, its hands are tied until wages growth, and the broader economy, strengthen.“Until then, homeowners can rest easy in the knowledge that their mortgage repayments won’t be increasing anytime soon.”The RBA board meets for the monthly monetary policy meeting on Tuesday with their decision on whether or not to move on rates to be announced at 1pm.Unemployment fell from 5.6 to 5.5 per cent last month but significantly more movement was needed to trigger a rate rise.FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOKFREE: GET THE COURIER-MAIL’S REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO INBOXlast_img read more

Researchers uncover evolutionary history of IBDassociated bowel cancer

first_img Source:https://www.qmul.ac.uk Jul 11 2018A team of researchers from Queen Mary University of London have reported the genetic events involved in the early development of bowel cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).Such knowledge may be able to be exploited to design simple diagnostic tests to stratify patients with IBD at high risk of developing cancer.IBD more than doubles an individual’s lifetime risk of developing bowel cancer, and the risk increases significantly if they have suffered with IBD for a sustained period of time. With this in mind, the study published in Gut performed in collaboration with researchers from St Mark’s Hospital and the University of Oxford set out to understand the genetics of how colorectal cancer develops in people with IBD.Lead researcher Professor Trevor Graham from Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary said: “Predicting who with IBD is going to go on to develop bowel cancer is a big unmet need. If we could do it accurately, it would allow us to target care to those who need it most, and spare low-risk individuals unnecessary worry. Here we have determined which genetic mutations tend to occur early in IBD-associated bowel cancer development. These mutations could form the basis of a simple diagnostic test for predicting who is at high risk.”Establishing a sequence of genetic eventsThe team looked at the genetic sequences of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples collected from patients with IBD-associated colorectal cancer. By comparing the sequences, the researchers were able to establish a timeline of events leading to the development of malignancy.Notably, the analysis identified some genetic alterations that tended to occur early in the progression to cancer, such as changes to the ‘tumor suppressor’ protein known as p53. Changes to p53 that result in the alteration or loss of its function usually occur later in the development of bowel cancers that are not associated with IBD, highlighting some genetic differences between colorectal cancer cases that have developed from IBD and those that have not.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerChanges in the number of copies of some chromosomes- the structures that carry our genetic information in the form of genes- were also common in the large majority of IBD-associated bowel cancer samples and accumulated early in their evolutionary timeline.The team hope that spotting these early genetic changes could be used as indicators to identify which patients with IBD are at immediate risk of bowel cancer, prompting close surveillance of the patient and permitting timely interception with the best treatment options. On the other hand, IBD sufferers not at risk of cancer development could be spared unnecessary worry.Future directionsFirst author Dr Annie Baker from Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary said: “In this exciting research we studied how IBD-associated bowel cancer develops over time, identifying crucial genetic changes that occur either prior to or at the onset of malignancy. Our findings have provided a strong foundation for future work, which will focus on how we can use this knowledge to improve how doctors assess, monitor and treat IBD patients in the clinic.”The team has recently received funding from Cancer Research UK (CRUK) through the Early Detection funding stream to validate that these genetic indicators are indeed effective markers of cancer risk. This is in addition to ongoing efforts, funded by Barts Charity, to identify prognostic biomarkers for bowel cancer in other IBD patient groups.last_img read more