Ørsted, world’s largest wind developer, sees growth opportunities in current market upheaval

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Ørsted A/S, the world’s largest wind farm developer, is sticking to its growth strategy and financial guidance amid the coronavirus pandemic and said it could even eke out an advantage as others in the market step on the brakes.While the Danish utility has put into place cautionary measures to help buffer the impact of the crisis, including increasing its provisions and conducting wide-ranging risk assessments on new projects, executives said the company’s EBITDA guidance range for 2020 of between 16 billion kroner and 17 billion kroner will remain intact, and its appetite for building new projects will stay strong.“We believe financially robust companies that maintain a long-term view on the market are likely to find additional opportunities in the wake of the current crisis,” CEO Henrik Poulsen said April 29 on the company’s first-quarter earnings call.Ørsted saw substantial earnings growth during the first quarter, largely powered by strong wind resources. “We are in a much less vulnerable position than many other sectors that regrettably are deeply impacted by this crisis,” Poulsen said. “However, the impact of COVID-19 will have material ripple effects throughout all economies and sectors. And you can rest assured that we will not be complacent about its potential impact on Ørsted.”In the short term, however, several Ørsted projects risk construction delays due to supply chain disruption, specifically because tools were laid down at a shipyard in Singapore that was building substations for the Hornsea 2 and Greater Changhua offshore wind farms. Deliveries of solar panels for the Permian Energy solar project in the U.S. are also delayed, Poulsen said.Despite this, Ørsted’s appetite for taking new projects remains strong. “We are still looking into a very significant number of auctions and tenders in 2020 and 2021 as most countries and states stick to the original timeline despite the COVID-19 situation,” Poulsen said.[Camilla Naschert]More ($): Ørsted doubles down on growth ambitions as others retreat due to COVID-19 Ørsted, world’s largest wind developer, sees growth opportunities in current market upheavallast_img read more

Appeals Court Affirms Ex-Nassau Police Commander’s Conviction

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A panel of appeals court judges upheld Wednesday the conviction of a former Nassau County police deputy commissioner found guilty of covering up a burglary committed by a police nonprofit donor’s son.Attorneys for William Flanagan last year appealed a jury verdict convicting him of conspiracy and two counts of official misconduct, all misdemeanors, following a month-long trial in 2013. Four judges for the New York State Supreme Court Appellate Division, Second Judicial Department in Brooklyn unanimously rejected the defense’s arguments that he didn’t receive a fair trial due to prosecutorial misconduct, prejudicial statements and insufficient evidence.“To the extent that some of the prosecutor’s remarks made during her opening statement and summation were improper, those remarks did not deprive the defendant of a fair trial,” the judges wrote in the Oct. 7 ruling. “And any other error in this regard was harmless, as there was overwhelming evidence of the defendant’s guilt, and no significant probability that any error contributed to the defendant’s conviction.”Prosecutors have said that Flanagan helped quash the case against Zachary Parker, of Merrick, who stole thousands of dollars worth of electronics from his alma mater, John F. Kennedy High School, in Bellmore shortly before he graduated in 2009 while he was an intern for the Nassau police Ambulance Bureau. The burglar’s father, Gary Parker, was volunteering for the nonprofit Nassau County Police Department Foundation when he asked for Flanagan’s help with his son’s case.“Public corruption cannot be tolerated, and we brought this case because nothing is more fundamental than equal treatment under the law,” Acting Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas said in response to the ruling. “I have the highest respect for the brave and honest men and women of our police forces, but when a police officer dishonors the badge by breaking the law, fair-minded people know that the law must apply equally to everyone and my office will hold them accountable.”Flanagan’s attorney, Donna Aldea, head of the Appellate Practice Group for Garden City-based Barket Marion Epstein & Kearon, LLP, said that she plans to file a motion for the case to be heard by the state Court of Appeals.“We continue to assert that Bill Flanagan did nothing wrong and was wrongfully convicted, and we were very disappointed by the Appellate Division’s decision today,” she said. “This won’t be the first time that the Court of Appeals is relied upon to right a wrong that other courts have overlooked.”Judge Mark Cohen—a Suffolk judge brought in after two Nassau judges recused themselves from the case—had sentenced Flanagan to 60 days in jail, but execution of that term was stayed pending the appeal. A court spokesman said that once the appeals court officially notifies Cohen of the ruling, a hearing will be scheduled in the case.Two other ex-police commanders—John Hunter, the retired Deputy Chief of Patrol, and Det. Sgt. Alan Sharpe—both pleaded guilty to misconduct and were sentenced to probation in connection with the case, which stemmed from a Press expose into police favoritism for the nonprofit’s donors. Zachary Parker pleaded guilty to burglary and was sentenced to prison after violating his probation. He has since been released.last_img read more

Cam Newton difference ‘like night and day’ with new throwing motion

first_imgA post shared by Cam Newton (@cameron1newton) on Aug 7, 2019 at 9:18am PDTIn the second half of last season, Newton was obviously unable to push the football downfield. Secondaries pushed closer to the line of scrimmage and Carolina was forced to insert backup Kyle Allen on plays that required a desperation heave into the end zone.According to Stats Perform data, Newton finished 20th in the NFL with only 22 big play passes that went for 25 yards or more.That shouldn’t be the case as the team has made it a point to post one Newton deep ball after another on social media throughout camp.Curtis Samuel doing Curtis Samuel things 🙌 pic.twitter.com/qlnu8X7w6Y— Carolina Panthers (@Panthers) August 13, 2019Quarterbacks coach Scott Turner has described Newton’s new motion as more compact, closed off and efficient. What that means for how Newton approaches the game is still unclear.Speaking to NBC Sports last month, Newton wouldn’t say if he’s lost a chunk of velocity, but he doesn’t think that really matters entering his ninth season. “To see him come back like he’s doing, I expect big things from him.” Bills running back Christian Wade hopes to hinge hype to roster spot While Newton will not make his preseason debut Friday against the Bills as many had expected, according to a report from The Athletic, the 2015 NFL MVP has been sharp through training camp.“It’s like night and day,” Bills defensive back Captain Munnerlyn (and member of the Panthers in 2018) told reporters this week after a joint practice (via The Charlotte Observer). “[Newton’s] arm looks a whole lot better now. Man, to see him come back from that injury, I know it’s been tough on him. Related News Philip Rivers: Tom Brady, other elite QBs can’t be judged solely by Super Bowl winscenter_img It feels like ages since Cam Newton last took a snap with defenders scratching and crawling to get to him in the pocket.Since being shut down for the season last December, Newton has undergone a second surgery on his throwing shoulder and re-invented his throwing motion to cope. His first tosses and minicamp in June gained a live broadcast by the Panthers on Facebook that’s been watched more the 160,000 times. View this post on Instagram “When you get old, you have to change certain things,” he said. “It kind of keeps you young. I actually look forward to it. I embrace this whole process because it’s made me feel like a rookie again. Learning certain things, learning new mechanics, focusing on the little nuances of playing a quarterback position and trying to master it. So at this point in my career, it’s not about velocity. It’s not about throwing a ball 70 yards. It’s about efficient football that’s gonna win football games.”That’s a mature approach from Newton, regardless of whether or not he was forced into it. Now we wait to see if there’s a payoff.last_img read more