New overtime threshold takes effect

first_img19 March 2003Employees who earn more than R115 575 per annum will, from 24 March, not be guaranteed overtime payment by the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.However, the Department of Labour says overtime payments for such employees can still be made if agreement is reached between employer and employee.Labour Department spokesman Snuki Zikalala said the move by the department aims to enable workers who earn less than R115 572 per annum to qualify automatically for overtime pay.The earnings threshold, which applies to both the public and private sector, is the wage level above which employees are excluded from the provisions of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act relating to the payment of overtime. The new threshold represents a R16 117 a year increase on the old level.The Act stipulates that overtime must be paid at 1.5 times the employee’s normal wage, with the option that an employee may agree to paid time off in return for overtime work.Senior management employees, employees engaged as sales staff who travel to the premises of customers and who regulate their own hours of work, and employees who work less than 24 hours a month, remain excluded from these overtime provisions.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Afcon ’17: Bafana draw Cameroon, Gambia and Mauritania

first_img9 April 2015Bafana Bafana have been drawn against Cameroon, Gambia and Mauritania in Group M of the 2017 Orange Africa Cup of Nations qualifiers.The tournament will be held in Gabon after a decision by the CAF Congress that saw the Central African country beat Ghana and Algeria to the vote to host the 31st Edition of CAF’s premier event. War-torn Libya was initially selected to host Afcon, but concerns over players and spectators’ safety pushed CAF to choose an alternative host.Bafana Bafana were among 52 countries that went into the hat at the draw in Cairo on Wednesday. Only the group winner will progress to the Afcon finals, which will include the two best-placed runners-up and the host nation.The first round of qualifying fixtures will take place from 8 to 16 June.Bafana Bafana coach Shakes Mashaba said he was happy with the draw, but warned that it would not be a walk in the park.“Some may see this as a relatively easy group. On paper it is, but on the field it is a different story altogether. I have said before that there are no easy matches in international football anymore. Football has changed and every country will give it a go,” he said.“While we may know much about Cameroon, not much is said about Gambia and Mauritania, and those could be our banana peels. We have to do what we did during the 2015 qualifiers – be brave, show no respect, but, above all, prepare thoroughly and take nothing for granted,” he added.“I am very happy with the draw and closer to the time we will reveal our plans as to how we will tackle the qualifiers. We did well in the 2015 qualifiers but that is all in the past and the important thing is maintain the standard we set by qualifying outright.”South Africa is ranked 55 on the Fifa World Rankings, Cameroon is 49 (10 on the continent), Mauritius is 190 (51 on the continent) and Gambia is 168 (46 on the continent).Bafana Bafana will open their 2017 Afcon qualifying account against Gambia at home on the weekend of 12, 13, 14 June this year.In the last qualifier, South Africa will host Mauritania on the weekend of 2, 3, 4 September 2016.South Africa’s 2017 Afcon fixturesSouth Africa vs Gambia (12,13,14 June 2015)Mauritania vs South Africa (4, 5, 6 September 2015)Cameroon vs South Africa (23, 24, 25, 26 March 2016)South Africa vs Cameroon (26, 27, 28, 29 March 2016)Gambia vs South Africa (3, 4, 5 June 2016)South Africa vs Mauritania (2, 3, 4 September 2016)Afcon 2017 – the full drawGroup A: Tunisia, Togo, Liberia, DjiboutiGroup B: Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, Central Africa Republic, MadagascarGroup C: Mali, Equatorial Guinea, Benin, South SudanGroup D: Burkina Faso, Uganda, Botswana, ComorosGroup E: Zambia, Congo, Kenya, Guinea BissauGroup F: Cape Verde, Morocco, Libya, Sao TomeGroup G: Nigeria, Egypt, Tanzania, ChadGroup H: Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, MauritiusGroup I: Cote d’Ivoire, Sudan, Sierra Leone, GabonGroup J: Algeria, Ethiopia, Lesotho, SeychellesGroup K: Senegal, Niger, Namibia, BurundiGroup L: Guinea, Malawi, Zimbabwe, SwazilandGroup M: Cameroon, South Africa, Gambia, MauritaniaSource: South African Football Associationlast_img read more

‘I feel good when I help others and see them prosper’

first_imgThato Mokhothu named her company RTT Construction after her children, Refilwe, Tshiamo and Tshego. She is not only building a legacy in the business world but also in the lives of many women through her Phenomenal Women initiative.Thato Mokhothu runs Phenomenal Women, her non-profit organisation, without remuneration and says she enjoys seeing it grow. “It has helped me to feel good about myself by helping others and seeing them prosper.” (Image supplied)Melissa JavanBloemfontein businesswoman Thato Mokhothu believes that playing a part in the community helps to decrease stress and eases depression.The eldest of her siblings, she saw her mother become depressed following her parents divorce in 2000. Mokhothu had to become the family breadwinner for her siblings, according to the Vie by Envie online magazine.She dropped out of college and started waitressing. But Mokhothu was determined to improve her situation and went on to qualify for the National Home Builders Registration Council Women Empowerment Business Course offered through the Gordon Institute of Business Science.In 2014 she completed a Seda Enterprise Development Programme. Mokhothu also became part of the Cherie Blair Mentorship Programme.Working towards a bigger goalPhenomenal Women focuses on female and youth empowerment, says the founder of RTT Construction, named for her children, Refilwe, Tshiamo and Tshego.Mokhothu set up her non-profit organisation as a network that allowed women to share information and business opportunities. It has a Facebook group of more than 16,000 members.One of the ways Phenomenal Women empowers women and youth is by helping to connect them with possible new clients in other provinces. This allows members of the network to do business with other women in other provinces.“[Working towards making your community a better place] brings people from diverse backgrounds together to work towards a common goal,” says Mokhothu, a Play Your Part ambassador.Other Phenomenal Women initiatives include hosting finance workshops, mentorship opportunities and training in payroll, compliance advice and supplier diversity programmes. Members of the network also do various charity events, such as working with an orphanage in Heidedal, in the Free State.Mokhothu says: “I believe if the majority of people [are] involved in community work, we will be able to decrease poverty, the high rate of unemployment and assist with the economic challenges that affecting our country at the moment.“We cannot rely on the government alone to take care of the community.”Brand South Africa journalist Melissa Javan talked to Mokhothu.MJ: Where did you get the idea for the NPO?TM: I have always liked to help other people — when I was working for Absa I made sure that I shared available positions with friends and other people.I would also share available tenders, knowing very well that I would be applying for the same tender. In 2013, I started Phenomenal Women, but it was not registered as yet.I had a restaurant and allowed women to showcase their products at the restaurant at no cost. I started to host business workshops and invited key roleplayers such as the South African Revenue Services and the National Youth Development Agency to come to the event at the restaurant.I saw how everyone was benefiting from the workshops. People would, for instance, come to buy shoes and bags, and would also buy a plate and cold drink from me.There were other women’s associations before but they were not active in the Free State. I have been a member of some of them, but I never got to enjoy the benefits of joining.In 2014, I decided to re-launch Phenomenal Woman and register it and run it differently from other existing women’s associations. I also believe in leading by example, which has pushed me to work very hard.MJ: When did you become involved in community work and how have you made it part of your decision-making as a businesswoman?TM: From a young age my father taught me that I needed to give and help other people in order for me to be blessed or to receive more. That’s how I have lived my life.When I was in high school I was the chairperson of the TADA (Teenagers Against Drug Abuse), working together with the police. In my tertiary years, I took care of people with disabilities, visiting them and doing their hair.When I worked at Absa Home Loans, I was the chairperson of the Home Loans corporate social investment [programme] for the Free State. Our project was to renovate a school and turn it into a house of safety for children. It is still going, run by Christian Revival Church.I then adopted a children’s home in Heidedal, where I helped with things such as clothes and food. I celebrated my birthdays with the children and asked people to buy the children presents instead of buying me birthday gifts.In my company I empower other women and youth by giving them construction sub-contracting work. This is to help increase their Construction Industry Development Board levels because I know how difficult it is out there to get someone who will give you a chance in business.MJ: What are your Phenomenal Women highlights?TM: My highlights are the testimonies of women who have achieved their dream. One woman in particular started off as a member of Phenomenal Women and was inspired to follow her dream.She is currently demolishing 650 shacks used as day care centres in the Free State, and is offering them better structures with the help of Letsatsi Power Projects. These centres are also offered nutritious meals.MJ: How important are relationships for an entrepreneur and for someone who wants to make an impact in society?TM: I believe that every relationship is very important. If they know you and know your business ethics, they will listen to you and they will do business with you.When you need help in any corporate social investment projects, they gratefully assist you.MJ: Can you share tips on using social media to talk about what you are doing?TM: I use my social media pages to inspire people to get involved in community life. You need to be consistent. For example, I use social media to promote community involvement campaigns and collaborations.Branding is also very important and I have made sure that my page is full of positive quotes. I also share job opportunities and tenders.I get messages every day from different people who are inspired by my work and who would like to join me or start similar projects that I do in the community.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

Chromebook Pixel: Why It Hurts To Slam Beautiful, Unnecessary Hardware

first_imgRelated Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img markhachman Tags:#Apple#Chromebook#design#Google#Macbook Pro#Retina display “How many people does it take to change a light bulb?” goes a version of the old joke, best told in a thick German accent, like Klaus Myers. “None, if properly engineered,” is the punchline. That joke speaks to us geeks who look beyond the “it just works” mentality, into something that approaches a harmony of function and purpose. And it’s why I simply hate criticizing products that aspire to a higher form, just because something simpler, cheaper and more straightforward will do just as well.Like the Chromebook Pixel.Quite honestly, I feel guilty about panning the Pixel. As Dan Lyons notes, Google designers have quietly taken their efforts to another level. But, as virtually everyone who attended Google’s Pixel press conference noted, the Pixel simply prices itself out of the game. For now, very little within Google’s cloud – whether it be its 100,000 Stars app or the upcoming Photos enhancement – justifies the 2,560 x 1,700 multi-touch display, not to mention the $1,300 price tag. Google’s Chromebook has established a niche as a wonderful companion PC or netbook: as long as you want to work on the Web, a $250 Chromebook fills the bill. So what the heck does anyone need Pixel for?Still, there’s so much in the Pixel that feels like an homage to notebooks I’ve loved before. On the outside, the Pixel is the aristocratic, well-bred child of a MacBook Air and the Lenovo ThinkPad: a solid, lightweight, rectangular slab of aluminum. A thin light bar on top glows blue when powered on, then cheekily flashes the Google rainbow as the lid closes. Google eliminated the icons on top of the I/O ports, correctly reasoning that most users would identify them by sight. No, there’s no magnetic connector holding the power cord in, but a large LED glows yellow, then green, when the Pixel is fully charged. Vents push air to the side, somehow, presumably through the ports. The “piano hinge” attaching the display to the frame slowly glides shut. There’s even a third microphone buried beneath the keyboard to eliminate typing noises during Hangouts.And, of course, there’s that jaw-dropping display. Don’t be afraid about the Web moving to a touch model; I tried out Internet Explorer’s showcase touch-enabled Web app, Contre Jour, and it runs just fine.Google Is Not AloneThe Chromebook Pixel doesn’t stand alone as an example of marvelously over-engineered hardware. Say what you want about Google’s Nexus Q – as the odd hybrid of an audio amplifier and media player, the fact that it only played back YouTube and Google Play videos eventually doomed it. But from a hardware standpoint, the odd little sphere with the LED strip around its equator and an amplifier inside was a revolution, just one that failed.I feel the same about the Lytro post-focusing camera, which many heralded as the evolution of consumer photography: terrific technology, but one that the world never needed. It didn’t help that the first iteration of the product looked like a spyglass, contained a woefully inadequate LCD viewfinder, and required the photos to be stored on the company website for best effect. Lytro has its fans, but the company’s status as the next “it” thing has long vanished.Everyone has their favorite examples of well-designed, yet ultimately irrelevant technology; the $1,699 Hitachi IdeaCentre Horizon Table PC, for example, which doubles as a high-definition Monopoly table. The Microsoft Surface, possibly, a marvelous piece of hardware that still prices itself out of some tablet conversations. Some lumped Apple’s “retina display” MacBook Pros into this category when if first came out, although over time the MacBook has developed a wealth of graphics apps supporting it that could help justify the high-resolution display.(See also Apple’s Brilliant Boondoggle: MacBook Pro Retina Display.)When Technology Trumps ProductI don’t review products for a living, but anyone who does do must constantly wrestle with a dilemma: How do you inform readers that a particular product may not be ready for prime time, but whose underlying technology is so innovative that it deserves commendation and even preservation? Two years ago, I wrote this piece about the Lytro, partly as a reaction to a generation of young bloggers who too-often seemed to naively accept the promise of any new technology.These days, the tech press seems to revel in asking the tough questions. If anything, the press pendulum has swung back toward cynicism.At the same time, though, crowdsourcing sites like KickStarter have become unabashed celebrations of entrepreneurship, bypassing the press to connect products directly with fans and backers.That’s a big difference: By exposing their plans and pricing, young start ups can work hand-in-hand with prospective customers. The risk of secrecy, as larger corporations sometimes discover, is that you can lose touch with the very customers you’re trying to court. And end up with a powerful, beautiful but over-priced, over-engineered product that isn’t well suited to meeting the needs of actual customers. It just hurts, sometimes, to have to be the one to break it to the folks who worked so hard to create something really cool that doesn’t have a clear place in the world.last_img read more

Middlesbrough charged by FA for failing to control players

first_imgMiddlesbrough have been charged by the Football Association for failing to control their players during Sunday’s 2-2 draw with Manchester City.Several Middlesbrough players reacted after referee Kevin Friend awarded a penalty for defender Marten de Roon’s challenge on Leroy Sane in the second half.”It is alleged that in or around the 66th minute of the fixture, the club failed to ensure that its players conducted themselves in an orderly fashion,” the FA said in a statement.Middlesbrough have until May 5 to respond to the charge.City striker Sergio Aguero scored the resulting penalty to level the game 1-1, with the visitors coming from behind again to secure a 2-2 draw after an 85th minute Gabriel Jesus strike.The result left 19th-placed Middlesbrough six points adrift of safety with three games to play.last_img read more

George Lois Slams Esquires EInk Cover

first_imgGeorge Lois, Esquire’s art director from 1962 to 1972, took a no holds barred approach to design, producing some of the most iconic covers in the history of magazines. Lois takes the same approach to interviews, telling AdAge media reporter Nat Ives how he was “embarrassed” by Esquire’s battery-powered e-ink cover, a “silly gimmick” that “cost a quarter of a million dollars, I’m told.” (Esquire’s issue touted the cover line, “The 21st Century Begins Now” with, as Lois described, “Mickey Mouse lights clicking on and off.”)Since April, the MOMA has been hosting a collection of Lois’ Esquire cover designs. During this interview, Lois said: “great covers need to have a great idea behind them.” Of Esquire’s cover, he said: “That wasn’t great; it was ridiculous.” “When will they learn?” Lois said of Esquire. “Oh lord, how long will it take for them to learn.”last_img read more