LeBron James Elated To Dunk on Jason Terrys Head

LeBron James put Jason Terry in a poster Monday night, punctuating the Miami Heat’s 23rd straight victory, the second-longest streak in NBA history, with one of his all-time  greatest dunks. According to James, the spectacular jam could not have happened on a better guy.You see, James expressed a problem with Terry’s penchant for brash talk. So, catching an alley-oop pass and colliding midair with Terry before hammering home the dunk – and then staring down a sprawled-on-the-floor Terry for so long he received a taunting technical – was serendipitous.“I’ve had a chance to [review] it, and it was one of my better ones,” James said. “The fact that it happened to J.T. made it that much sweeter. Because we all know J.T. and he talks too much sometimes. And I’m glad it happened to him.”Hardly do players pile on after slamming on an opponent. There usually is a “feel-sorry” element to embarrassing a foe.Not this time. James took it as some form of restitution toward a good player who talks better than his game.Recall, if you will, Terry in 2011 saying said James wouldn’t be able to guard him effectively for the entire NBA Finals when the Heat challenged the Dallas Mavericks. Terry played well and the Mavs defeated Miami in the seven-game series, 4-2.“I’m welcoming the challenge,” Terry said then. “We’re going to see if he can do it for seven games.”Last week, Terry said he wasn’t impressed with the Heat’s then-21-game winning streak.“[I’m] not really impressed with it or anything that they do,” Terry said.No word on if he’s impressed with James’ memorable throw down over him. read more

New Rumor Heat Wants to Make Room to Acquire

How about a Big 4 in Miami instead of the championship trio of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh? Reports indicate as the Heat officials focus on winning a third straight NBA title, their thoughts linger on wooing the impending free agent and New York Knicks star forward.Sources told ESPN.com that Heat officials and the team’s leading players have already started to explore their options for creating sufficient financial flexibility to make an ambitious run at adding this summer in free agency.The mere concept would require the stars James, Wade and Bosh to all opt out of their current contracts by the end of the month and likely take further salary reductions in new deals that start next season to give Miami the ability to offer Anthony a representative first-year salary.The Heat also are prevented from making any formal contact with Anthony until July 1 and can do so then only if he opts out of the final year of his current contract. Anthony has until June 23 to notify the Knicks of his intentions, according to sources.With cooperation from their stars and role players Udonis Hslem and Chris Anderson, who also have player options for next season, the Heat could open up in excess of $50 million in cap space this summer and have the most financial flexibility in the league. The only Heat player locked into place for next season is Norris Cole at a salary of $2 million, although team president Pat Riley will have to contend with a handful of cap holds for pending free agents as well as their upcoming first-round pick (No. 26 overall) in the draft later this month. read more

A Baseballs Exit Velocity Is Five Parts Hitter One Part Pitcher

For years sabermetrics has theorized that pitchers can’t control what happens after a batter strikes a ball. Whether it bloops in for a hit, rockets its way to an outfielder’s glove or lands just inches outside the foul line, it’s a consequence of the batter and the defense, but not the pitcher. That argument is what led to Fielding Independent Pitching (FIP), a statistic that attempts to quantify a pitcher’s performance only for the events for which we know the pitcher has definite responsibility (walks, strikeouts and home runs — in sabermetrics parlance, the “Three True Outcomes”). FIP throws out base hits completely on the basis that they are partially a product of the defense.But now we have Statcast. The new technology that collects data on the position and velocity of the ball and the players on the field is beginning to change what we know (or thought we knew) about all sorts of things — pitching included. And that’s raising new questions about how much effect a pitcher can have on a ball once it’s put in play. The answer might be: a lot.But first, let’s talk batters. Last week, I used Statcast to show that harder-struck pitches tend to fall for hits more often. That, generally, makes hard contact good for the hitter and bad for the pitcher. Obviously, some hitters are better at hitting the ball hard. What Statcast tells us is that some pitchers are better at making batters hit the ball softly.That’s not to say pitchers hold the upper hand. In my models1Specifically, I used a linear random effects model with the R package lme4. The model was specified as follows:Batted ball velocity ~ (1|hitter) + (1|pitcher) + (1|ballpark).In total, batter explains 3 percent of the variance in batted ball velocity, while pitcher explains 0.6 percent and park 0.03 percent. of batted ball velocity that incorporate the pitcher, batter and ballpark, the batter’s effect dominates the pitcher’s. A ball’s exit velocity after a bat strikes it is about five times more the batter’s doing than the pitcher’s. This fact seems to partially vindicate FIP — batters really are the ones in control.At the same time, the pitcher’s effect is not negligible.2Deriving a p-value in a random effects model is tricky. However, the random effect for pitchers significantly improves the model by AIC, improves out-of-sample prediction accuracy, and is larger than expected under a null distribution derived from permutations. While the best batters increase batted ball velocity by as much as 7-8 mph, the best pitchers suppress it by 1.5 mph compared with the average pitcher.That has real significance: Such a decrease roughly equates to a 13-point decrease in batting average on balls in play (BABIP) for a given batted ball.3This number comes from a logistic regression of exit velocity for each batted ball. Over the course of a game, the pitchers who can best decrease exit velocity save about a quarter of a run (on average). A quarter of a run doesn’t sound like much? Multiplied over a season, all those quarters of a run add up to about one win of value.4Run expectancy numbers are derived from a linear regression of linear weights value per pitch on batted ball velocity. Linear weights values come from Pitch Info.So that means FIP is flawed as an overall value metric, at least for some pitchers. Who are those pitchers? Here’s a table of all 485 pitchers with batted ball data this season as of the writing of this article.5This amounts to 17,768 batted balls. You may notice that most relievers are close to zero on this list. That’s because the model does not have enough data per reliever to be certain that they are altering velocity heavily, so it regresses their readings to the mean. Search for your favorite pitcher and see how many miles per hour he takes away from or adds to the average batted ball. The five best pitchers in the league: the Baltimore Orioles’ Wei-Yin Chen (balls leave the bat 1.63 mph slower than average when Chen pitches); the Chicago White Sox’s Chris Sale (1.56 mph); the Los Angeles Angels’ Garrett Richards (1.53 mph); the St. Louis Cardinals’ Adam Wainwright (1.46 mph, before he experienced a season-ending injury April 25); and the Houston Astros’ Dallas Keuchel (1.40 mph). Many of these pitchers are bona fide aces, most obviously Sale, Richards and Wainwright (Clayton Kershaw also lurks in ninth place). These players are not only adept at managing contact, they are also skilled strikeout artists. FIP accurately tabs them as great pitchers even without information about their contact-controlling abilities.These pitchers control their opposition’s quality of contact partly by driving the hitters into bad counts. In pitcher’s counts, hitters tend to put weak, defensive swings on the ball, resulting in glancing contact. About 15 percent of pitchers’ exit velocity suppression comes from controlling the count.6This estimate is derived by incorporating count into the model as a fixed effect and then determining how much the pitcher’s estimated random effect decreased. Richards, for example, has reached two-strike counts in 92 of his opponents’ plate appearances, compared with three-ball counts in only 38; in the former, hitters have a .271 BABIP, whereas in the latter, they have a .333 BABIP.7The league difference is a bit smaller, but still significant: .291 BABIP with three balls, .281 with two strikes.Chen is an intriguing case. The best at suppressing batted ball velocity, Chen also has the largest gap between ERA and FIP among qualified starters. In fact, Chen has put up a sizable gap between his ERA and FIP in three of the four years in which he’s pitched in MLB. Lacking batted ball velocity in years prior, we cannot say that his skill is consistent, but his results appear to be.FIP doesn’t only fail to credit the pitchers who manage their opponent’s batted ball velocity, it also fails to blame bad ones who consistently get hit hard.The league’s bottom five in that respect: the Pittsburgh Pirates’ Vance Worley (1.43 mph added to a ball’s exit velocity, compared with average); the Tampa Bay Rays’ Nate Karns (1.39 mph); the San Francisco Giants’ Tim Lincecum (1.16 mph); the Kansas City Royals’ Yordano Ventura (1.11 mph); and the San Diego Padres’ James Shields (1.06 mph). Just as the best pitchers tended to be better than average even by FIP, these five are worse. And while the aces use the count to their advantage, these pitchers are liable to find themselves in hitter’s counts, which causes some of their problems in the first place.Their exit velocity stats are also worse because they serve up pitches down the middle of the plate. Batters crave these meatballs and can punish them for extra-base hits and home runs. When I took pitch location out of the model, the pitchers’ effects on batted ball velocities fell by 20 percent on average.8Location was added into the model with a quadratic term for horizontal and vertical coordinates after adjusting for the count.Ventura, the Royals’ young flamethrower, is a conspicuous member of this worst-in-the-league list. Like Worley and Karns, he tends to throw his four-seam fastball more often than the league average.9Using pitch tags generously supplied to me by Pitch Info. That’s significant because fastballs tend to get hammered the hardest (even adjusting for count and location). Ventura, and other fastball-heavy starters, run the risk of allowing harder contact and more hits.The idea that pitchers can, in fact, influence their BABIP is not new. Shortly after the initial publication of DIPS, Tom Tippett (currently employed by the Red Sox) wrote about how the best pitchers seemed to be able to control the probability that their struck pitches would fall for hits. Tippett had only anecdotal examples such as Pedro Martinez and Greg Maddux, so the sabermetric community coalesced on the idea that they could be exceptions to a very reasonable rule.Now that we have Statcast’s data, we can see otherwise. No one will mistake Wei-Yin Chen for Pedro Martinez, but it appears that Chen can repeatably depress his opponent’s batted ball velocity, and a statistic such as FIP will fail to credit him for that skill.10Fortunately, new statistics such as Baseball Prospectus’ DRA (Deserved Run Average) do take into account all the events in which a pitcher plays a part. In fact, individual pitchers’ DRAs better correlate with the velocity suppression effects I calculated than their FIPs do, indicating that DRA is capturing some of this skill. Statcast’s data is beginning to challenge not only our views of specific players, but also some of the fundamental precepts of sabermetrics.Special thanks to Baseball Savant for the batted ball data; Pitch Info and Harry Pavlidis for the use of pitch tag data; and Jonathan Judge, Greg Matthews, Harry Pavlidis and Dan Turkenkopf for helpful comments and feedback.CORRECTION (May 22, 11:38 a.m.): An earlier version of this article stated that Wei-Yin Chen had a sizable gap between his ERA and FIP all four years in which he pitched in the league. That wasn’t true in 2013, when his ERA was slightly higher than his FIP. read more

Urban Meyer I do believe Braxtons a Heisman candidate

Braxton for Heisman?Through the first nine weeks of the season, Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer declined to consider his star sophomore quarterback, Braxton Miller, a candidate for this year’s Heisman Trophy. Following the team’s ninth consecutive victory on Saturday at Penn State, Meyer’s response changed.“I do believe Braxton’s a Heisman candidate,” Meyer said. “He has to play much better, however, from just sheer production on a team that’s 9-0, it puts him in that category.”Miller ranks 10th nationally with 2,620 yards of total offense and ranks fifth nationally with 1,093 rushing yards. The OSU quarterback has also 12 passing and 12 rushing touchdowns this season.Meyer said Miller’s progression as a quarterback this season is “on schedule.”“Somebody would say he should be a better thrower by now, and he should be,” Meyer said. “But there’s other areas of his game that have really improved.”Meyer said he does not know who the other candidates are but mentioned Kansas State senior quarterback Collin Klein and West Virginia senior quarterback Geno Smith when discussing the award.Meyer also named Miller as OSU’s offensive player of the week. Miller completed 7-of-19 passes for 143 yards with one touchdown and one interception against Penn State but also ran for 134 yards and two touchdowns.Miller also received recognition on a national level. Miller was announced on Monday as one of 16 semifinalists for the Maxwell Award, an award recognizing the collegiate player of the year.Praise for Penn State performanceMeyer said he was proud of his team’s overall performance in their 35-23 road win in State College, Pa., on Saturday.“Our guys responded well in a very tough situation,” Meyer said. “Overall, very good team win … our best team win we’ve had.”Meyer said his Buckeyes are a “special” team.“They’re fighting for each other,” Meyer said. “It’s a refuse-to-lose type atmosphere.”Wide receivers coach Zach Smith said he did not foresee the Buckeyes starting out the season with a 9-0 record.“I think it’s a testament to just the commitment of a group of guys that refuse to lose a game,” Smith said. “I wouldn’t say that we are an undefeated football team that is sitting here just dominating people … There’s a lot of stuff we can improve at every position in every phase, but what you love to see is that teamwork and that cohesion of players that go out and win the game because they have the passion for each other and this university and ultimately the team.”Awards all around for BuckeyesSophomore outside linebacker Ryan Shazier, who had eight total tackles, two sacks, an interception returned for a touchdown and a forced fumble in Saturday’s win, was named the Big Ten co-defensive player of the week on Monday.In addition to Miller, two other Buckeyes were named as national semifinalists for major college football awards. Junior defensive tackle Johnathan Hankins was named one of 16 semifinalists for the Chuck Bednarik Award, which is awarded to college football’s outstanding defensive player of the year. Redshirt sophomore cornerback Bradley Roby, who was credited with four pass breakups in Saturday’s game, was also named a semifinalist for the Jim Thorpe Award, which recognizes the nation’s best defensive back.Meyer said Monday that Shazier and Roby were named OSU’s co-defensive players of the week. Sophomore wide receiver Devin Smith, who had two special teams tackles, was named special teams player of the week.Redshirt junior left tackle Jack Mewhort, junior left guard Andrew Norwell, senior right tackle Reid Fragel, redshirt senior tight end Jake Stoneburner, sophomore wide receiver Evan Spencer and junior running back Carlos Hyde were named as offensive champions along with Miller.Additionally, Meyer awarded redshirt sophomore Adam Griffin a “Scarlet Shirt” award for his efforts on special teams, which included a pass breakup on a fake punt pass.Griffin said being recognized for his effort “means a lot” to him.“It just lets you know that all the hard work you put in throughout practice and throughout camp is paying off,” Griffin said.Injury reportMeyer said redshirt senior outside linebacker Etienne Sabino, who has missed the last three games with a broken right fibula, is questionable for Saturday’s game versus Illinois.Aside from Sabino, however, Meyer said the team has a relatively clean bill of health.“Our trainers say we’re as healthy as we’ve been,” Meyer said. read more

Ohio State womens volleyball to continue streak of road games

OSU sophomore middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe (10) and freshman outside hitter Luisa Schirmer (5) go for a block during a game against FGCU on Sept. 5 at St. John Arena. OSU won, 3-1.Credit: Emily Yarcusko / For The LanternThe Ohio State women’s volleyball team is set to hit the road to continue a series of 10 consecutive away games.The Buckeyes are scheduled to travel to Oxford, Ohio, this weekend to compete in the Miami (Ohio) University Invitational.OSU (6-3) is scheduled to play the University of Alabama-Birmingham (3-8) on Friday at 4 p.m., followed by a doubleheader on Saturday with Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (5-7) at 10 a.m. and tournament host Miami (Ohio) (5-4) at 7 p.m.Once the Buckeyes finish the final non-conference tournament of the season, they’ll be set to start Big Ten play. However, the Buckeyes aren’t scheduled to play a Big Ten opponent at home until Oct. 8 against Illinois.But senior outside hitter Erin Sekinger said she’s grown to like playing on the road throughout her career.“We look at it as road warriors,” Sekinger said. “It’s a different atmosphere and you get the crowd chanting against you, which gives you more motivation to play better.”Sophomore setter Maggie Heim added that playing more road games in front of “brutal” away crowds at the beginning of the year helps the team prepare for the season.OSU coach Geoff Carlston said the women are getting more comfortable with their offensive and defensive performances, but they cannot make the small errors like they did last weekend in the Millennium Hotel Invitational. OSU finished the tournament in Cincinnati, Ohio, with two wins split by a loss to the Ohio Bobcats.“We made some untimely errors against Ohio, but we made some really great, really big plays against (Syracuse and Xavier),” Carlston said. “You can’t give points away. Teams are too good to be missing serves.  We have to be aggressive, so we’re going to miss some serves, but we’re not missing back-to-back serves and serves at the end of games.”Once the Buckeyes conclude non-conference play, they are set to head to Minnesota and Wisconsin to open the Big Ten season. The Minnesota match is scheduled for Wednesday at 8 p.m., while the Wisconsin match is set for Sept. 28 at 2 p.m. read more

Number of tickinfested dogs doubles in a year

first_imgChris Packham has promoted the Big Tick ProjectCredit:Rex Features  “As there seems to be a rise in tick numbers, we need to be concerned and be aware of the potential for increasing problems.”Pet owners in urban areas need to be as concerned as people walking dogs in more rural areas.”We did a survey recently where we looked at tick abundance in parks in cities and we found about 30 per cent of parks had ticks.”Particularly where there is woodland or areas of areas of long grass, there is a risk.” The Ixodes ricinus tick carries Lyme diseaseCredit:Scott Camazine /Alamy The team of scientists also identified a number of Dermacentor reticulatus ticks, which can transmit the potentially fatal disease canine babesiosis. These were collected from dogs in Wales and South West England.TV presenter and naturalist Chris Packham, who has championed is part of the project, said: “The first thing that is striking about the results is that almost one in three dogs that were taken into vets and randomly tested were carrying ticks, which is shocking.”Also, these ticks were not just found in isolated parts of the UK, but all over the UK. “I would say that this is a tremendously significant project. It’s the largest of its kind ever conducted in the UK and it has been extensive. Dogs can become very unwell with babesiosis Pet owners in urban areas need to be as concerned as people walking dogs in more rural areasProfessor Richard Wall An engorged tick The number of dogs suffering tick bites has doubled in a year as vets warn 90 per cent could carry Lyme and other deadly diseases.Vets taking part in The Big Tick Project studied more than 12,000 dogs over a 16 week period in Spring 2015. Almost one third of the dogs, 31 per cent, were found to be carrying a tick, up from 15 per cent on a study in 2014.In the study, 89.2 per cent of the dogs with ticks were found to be infested with the species Ixodes ricinus which is the principal carrier of Lyme disease and Anaplasma. Dog at the vet I’m on @WimbledonCommon tomorrow to launch #Tickawarenessmonth with @BigTickProject – https://t.co/seDyv4lTOS pic.twitter.com/hA7BcD0KcX— Chris Packham (@ChrisGPackham) September 1, 2016 Chris Packham “It was well supported by vets and dog owners too and the data has been rigorously analysed by the University of Bristol.”This is good solid hard data which revealed some very shocking and surprising things about the distribution, the population and potential that ticks have to give diseases to our pets and ourselves.”The advice is very clear, go to your vet and speak to them about the most effective tick control for your pet.”Lyme disease in dogs can lead them to being lethargic, have swollen joints and nodes and can result in fatal kidney disease. Professor Richard Wall, from the University of Bristol said: “The work that we have carried out shows that ticks are extremely widely dispersed.”Everywhere across the UK we are likely to get a fairly high abundance of ticksat particular times of the year.”The records that we have got appear to show that we have had an increase intick numbers right across the country.”What we are primarily concerned about is the diseases that ticks carry. In the UK we have relatively low rates of the prevalence of these pathogens at the moment and in contrast in continental Europe they have much higher rates of disease. Symptoms for babesiosis, which is more serious, include lethargy, lack of appetite, fever, anemia, pale gums, an enlarged abdomen, weight loss and jaundice.Dogs which had died from babesiosis had previously been abroad, but the disease has now hit animals which haven’t left the British Isles. One of the dogs checked by vets during the study had 200 ticks.As part of The Big Tick Project, scientists from the University of Bristol mapped the ticks collected to build a picture of the current geographical spread of ticksin the UK and the resulting interactive map, searchable by postcode, shows the risk across the country on a scale of one to five.The data shows the highest prevalence of tick infestation is in South West England, East Anglia and Scotland, but levels are high throughout of Central and Northern England. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Driver to stand trial over cyclists death after crowdfunding appeal raises £60k

first_imgMs Purcell, of St Albans, Hertfordshire, spoke in court only to confirm her name and indicate a not guilty plea to causing death by careless driving.She left court with two male companions using a newspaper to cover her face.Ms Purcell was released on unconditional bail and will next appear at Southwark Crown Court on October 11. Gail Purcell left Westminster magistrates’ court with two male companions using a newspaper to cover her faceCredit:Jack Hardy/PA Michael Goodwin, prosecuting, said it was a “serious” and “complex” case that should be heard in the crown court.The CDF and Cycling UK brought the private prosecution following donations from more than 1,600 supporters, who helped raise more than £60,000 towards case costs.The CDF, a campaigning body that defends the rights of cyclists, was set up in 2001 by Cycling UK in response to the case of Darren Coombes, a nine-year-old cyclist who suffered brain damage from a collision with a motorist.Duncan Dollimore, a CDF spokesman, said: “This is an important step towards what we hope will be justice for Mick Mason’s family.” Gail Purcell leaving court A woman is to stand trial accused of causing the death of a cyclist after a crowdfunding appeal by the victim’s family raised £60,000 to fund a private prosecution.Gail Purcell, 58, allegedly hit cyclist Mick Mason from behind on February 25, 2014, causing a traumatic brain injury.The 70-year-old teacher was cycling home on Regent Street from Oxford Circus, in central London, at rush-hour when he was involved in a collision with Purcell’s Nissan Juke.Mr Mason suffered a serious brain injury and never regained consciousness, dying 19 days later after being taken off life support on March 14. Ms Purcell had stopped at the scene. The Metropolitan Police twice decided not to refer the case to the Crown Prosecution Service.Mr Mason’s family members – including his daughter, BBC journalist Anna Tatton-Brown – decided to go ahead with a private prosecution. It is believed to be the first in a case of its kind.Ms Tatton-Brown attended the hearing at Westminster magistrates’ court on Tuesday supported by friends and colleagues, including BBC entertainment reporter Lizo Mzimba.A JustGiving page was set up by charity Cycling UK’s Cyclists’ Defence Fund (CDF) – a campaigning body which, in part, focuses on providing legal assistance to cyclists – to raise money for the legal costs.center_img This is an important step towards what we hope will be justice for Mick Mason’s familyDuncan Dollimore, Cyclists’ Defence Fund Mick Mason was cycling home on Regent Street in central London when he was struck Mick Mason was cycling home on Regent Street in central London when he was struck. Library imageCredit:Google Street View Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Dashcam films moment hero policeman saves unconscious driver

first_imgA police dashcam filmed the dramatic moment a heroic police officer skillfully stopped an unconscious driver on a motorway.The driver was a mother who collapsed unconscious behind the wheel of a car with her baby in the back.PC Danny Pattison was on patrol when he got the call to say a Peugot 206 had been spotted driving erratically along the A42 and M1.The officer arrived close to junction 23 where he saw the runaway car weaving across all three lanes.In the video, the dashcam shows how PC Pattison skillfully rammed the car off the motorway before driving in front to stop it.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “I knew the only thing I could do is try and slow the car down but I also knew that could end badly.”But during the bit on the footage were she went towards the curb I felt helpless and my heart sank, which is why I made the decision not to wait for the other police cars to come to me and I had to force her into the barrier.”I gently pulled up alongside and began to push the car against the barrier and then as it slowed I pulled across the front of it.”The woman was still unconscious and her foot was on the accelerator but I managed to get it to stop.”After the dramatic rescue, PC Pattison’s colleague brought the woman out of her coma with a bar of chocolate he had with him for his lunch.Paramedics checked over the mother and child but either had any injuries. Pc Pattison said: “My colleague Tom, who was in the car behind, had effectively stopped any other cars passing me, giving me an open road in front.”I pulled up alongside and saw the woman with her head completely back, staring at the roof of the car. She was out, she was obviously unconscious.”Then I saw the child in the back, about 18 months old.”I thought: ‘This is going to end up with her and the baby getting killed’ so I ran through in my head all the options I had.center_img Unconscious driver on motorway Unconscious driver on motorwaylast_img read more

Man accused of MP Jo Coxs murder opts not to give evidence

first_imgRight wing documents and books in the home of Thomas MairCredit:West Yorkshire Police A knife that was presented in evidence during the trial of Thomas Mair A Nazi eagle found on Thomas Mair’s bookcase containing books about the Third ReichCredit:West Yorkshire Police Right wing documents and books in the home of Thomas Mair Show more Emergency services at the scene of Jo Cox’s murder in Birstall, West YorkshireCredit:Ben Lack for The Telegraph He told jurors: “The comprehensive nature of the evidence does not mean the defence case is bereft of points to make.”We submit to you that those points have no sufficient substance to cause any dent to the prosecution case.”Defending Mair, Simon Russell Flint QC said the killing of Mrs Cox as she carried out her “public duties” had been “truly shocking and appalling”.He told the court: “She was brutally and callously murdered and there is no issue or dispute about that.” Mr Whittam went on to say it was fitting that the case had been held before another woman – whose statue holding the scales of justice adorns the Old Bailey.At the conclusion of the evidence, the scales were “weighted only one way”, he said.Mr Whittam said there was a “comprehensive” catalogue of evidence against Mair, including CCTV footage, the testimony of eyewitnesses, DNA and gunshot residue, ballistics and physical evidence. A gun that was presented in evidence during the trial of Thomas MairCredit:West Yorkshire Police The two extremes of humanity came face to face when far right fanatic Thomas Mair brutally murdered Labour MP Jo Cox, jurors have been told.The 53-year-old allegedly shot and stabbed the mother of two as she arrived at Birstall library, in West Yorkshire, for a surgery on June 16, a week before the EU referendum.The defendant, who allegedly shouted “Britain first”, had a stash of neo-Nazi material at his home and had collected a dossier on his 41-year-old Remain campaigning MP, the Old Bailey heard.On Tuesday afternoon, the judge, Mr Justice Wilkie, adjourned the case until 10am on Wednesday when he said he would finish summing up expert, medical and forensic evidence before asking the jury to retire to consider its verdict. At the conclusion of the prosecution case, his lawyer Simon Russell Flint, QC, called no evidence on behalf of Mair, of Lowood Lane, Birstall.In his closing speech, prosecutor Richard Whittam QC told jurors: “At 13.48 on the 16th of June in Market Street outside the public library in Birstall, the democratically-elected MP for Batley and Spen, Jo Cox, was murdered as she carried out her duties on behalf of her electorate.”Constituents were waiting to speak to her in the library.”The sheer brutality of her murder and the utter cowardice of her murderer bring the two extremities of humanity face to face.” Despite having the “element of surprise”, Mair failed in his first attempt and came back to shoot and stab Mrs Cox again, the court heard.Mr Whittam said: “Perhaps he underestimated Jo Cox’s tenacity and courage.”He said that all the evidence “compellingly establishes Thomas Mair was her murderer”. Emergency services at the scene of Jo Cox's murder in Birstall, West Yorkshire The Nazi eagle found on Thomas Mair's bookcase containing books about the Third Reich A gun that was presented in evidence during the trial of Thomas Mair A knife that was presented in evidence during the trial of Thomas MairCredit:West Yorkshire Police Mair denies Mrs Cox’s murder, possession of a firearm with intent to commit an indictable offence and possession of an offensive weapon – a dagger.He also pleads not guilty to causing grievous bodily harm with intent to pensioner Bernard Kenny when he tried to stop the attack on Mrs Cox.The judge, Mr Justice Wilkie, said he would sum up the case for the jury this afternoon. Mr Russell Flint said: “Mrs Cox’s death, you know, has touched many hundreds, perhaps thousands, of people, some who knew her and knew her well – her parents, her sibling, her husband, her children, not forgetting her friends and her colleagues who will forever be scarred by what happened to her in the street of that small West Yorkshire town on that June afternoon and will forever mourn her passing.”Addressing the jury, he said: “It is you and you alone who have been charged with the responsibility of determining what are the true verdicts on each of the counts on the indictment.”He added: “You and you alone will determine whether Thomas Mair can return to his quiet and solitary existence or will be forever remembered as the man who assassinated Jo Cox.” Mrs Cox was a hard-working MP and mother of two young children.Mr Whittam said her attack “brought out the best of the people who were with her” – the two members of staff and Birstall residents who came to her aid.They came from all walks of life, he said, including a taxi driver and a 77-year-old man who was wounded as he tried to intervene.Mr Whittam had suggested in his opening address that Mair’s assault was “cowardly”.He told jurors: “Now you have heard the evidence you may have no doubt that it was.” Show more Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Whale watchers warned to stay away from humpback spotted off south Devon

first_imgHundreds of people gather at Slapton Sands in Devon to get a glimpse of the Humpback Whale seen in the sea in the area Hundreds of people gather at Slapton Sands in Devon to get a glimpse of the Humpback Whale seen in the sea in the areaCredit:Paul Slater Images Ltd “I am convinced the adult whale is not well – it is too far south, and it’s in completely in the wrong place.”It should be in the middle of the Atlantic, and it’s rare to see one on its own.”I was really hoping it was a Minke whale, as we occasionally see them off the coast here, and they move through and they’re fine. But this is a humpback and it is obviously in trouble.”There is nothing we can do for it unfortunately, and the last thing we need is people going out in boats to take photos of it.”She fears the whale will ‘beach’ and get stranded.”At that point it would be game over. If that happens, the best thing would be for someone to go and put it out of its misery, anything else is just prolonging its suffering and stressing the animal out.” She said it is being harassed by boats after moving to Start Bay from Slapton Ley where it was sighted in mid-week.Harassment of whales can result in a £5,000 fine or even a prison sentence through the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.The Devon and Severn Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority promised to be on scene shortly to police the area.It’s feared Storm Doris has blown the gentle giant and her calf to the West Country coast. Humpback whales are one of the biggest creatures on the planet.They can grow up to thirty tons and stretch to 50ft in length, but it seems  her strength wasn’t enough to withstand Dotty.She was first spotted floundering in the storm-lashed waves 100 yards off the coast at Slapton Ley earlier this week.Though its cavernous mouth could swallow a car, it is totally harmless – it loves to hoover up a ‘soup’ of millions of micropscopic plankton with every gulp.Humpbacks cover vast distances – often spending part of the year in Antarctica then deserting the South Pole to swim up towards the seas around the North Pole, sometimes pitching up in Beitish waters. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.center_img Concerns are growing for a rare whale and its calf which has been spotted close into shore at a British beauty spot Police have warned whale enthusiasts to stay away from a humpback spotted off the south Devon coast.  Dozens of sightseers have been scrambling aboard boats to get close enough to take photos of the whale after she was swept towards the shore with her baby.Crowds have been drawn to the area, but a police spokesman said: “Please do not go anywhere near it on a boat”.Wildlife expert Linda Hingley, from Brixham Seawatch, said she believes the mother whale is is lost.She said the noise from boat engines will add to the mother whale’s distress and disorientation and reduce their chances of survival. Concerns are growing for a rare whale and its calf which has been spotted close into shore at a British beauty spotCredit: MIKE LANGMAN/APEXlast_img read more

HMS Queen Elizabeth squeezes out of dockyard for the first time and

first_imgBritain’s largest ever warship has squeezed out of its dockyard, as the ship heads out on sea trials. The 65,000 ton HMS Queen Elizabeth slipped out of Rosyth dockyard and into open water through an exit with only 14in clearance on either side and 20in of water under the keel.The aircraft carrier then edged along the Forth under three bridges, including the landmark rail bridge, with a little over six feet to spare. HMS Queen Elizabeth, one of two new aircraft carriers for the Royal Navy, on the Firth of Forth after leaving the Rosyth dockyard Commanding Officer Captain Jerry Kyd onboard the HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircraft Carrier at Rosyth Dockyard After trials begin this summer, the ship will move to its new home in Portsmouth this autumn. Trials for planes and helicopters will take place next summer.The flight deck is more than four acres in size and the ship can carry up to 36 F-35B stealth jump jets. The new Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth departs Rosyth dockyard to be tested in the North Sea on June 26, 2017 in Rosyth The carrier's flight deck is more than four acres in size HMS Queen Elizabeth, one of two new aircraft carriers for the Royal Navy, on the Firth of Forth after leaving the Rosyth dockyard near Edinburgh The arrival of the new carrier comes as the Navy is facing a budget black hole of around £500m each year and the demands of manning the new ships have been accused of causing shortages elsewhere.Critics of the carriers have also claimed they are expensive white elephants that are too vulnerable to new high speed missiles. He said: “We will go where it’s best to go and not where it’s best for a Soviet nuclear to go, so the reality is we can probably look after ourselves as long as our escort is in the right place at the right time. You don’t have to hang around and endure it, you can move away and go somewhere else.” HMS Queen Elizabeth on the Firth of ForthCredit: Andrew Milligan/PA The aircraft carrier squeezes out of dock to begin sea trialsCredit:Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Europe HMS Queen Elizabeth, one of two new aircraft carriers for the Royal Navy, with its radio mast down on the Firth of Forth after leaving the Rosyth dockyard Bosuns mate Scott Campbell guards the Navy’s new warshipCredit:Getty The trials mark the latest milestone in the nearly decade-long building of the Royal Navy’s two carriers, at a cost of more than £6bn.The Navy is also preparing for the warship’s first appearance to attract a concerted Russian spying effort, with submarines, ships and planes try to get a good look at the UK’s new flagship. Bosuns mate Scott Campbell guards the Navy's new warship HMS Queen Elizabeth is pulled by tugs under the Forth Rail Bridge in the Firth of Forth The first steel was cut on the carrier eight years ago but it will not be sent on operations until 2021. Early deployments are expected to see US Marines F-35B jets embarked alongside British planes, to make up for early shortages of UK jets.The Royal Navy has not had an aircraft carrier since the defence cuts of 2010. Embargo will be lifted on at 0:01 on Monday 26 June. Grabs from the animation of HMS Queen Elizabeth leaving the Rosyth basin and progression under the Forth Bridges Handout from Rachael Gordon, Head of Corporate Media Relations, BAE Systems plc Capt Jerry Kyd, commanding officer, said: “There is nothing on the globe that is invulnerable, whether that’s a city, a car, an individual, or a ship. We are not shy in the military to understanding the risks and how we mitigate that in the theatre of war. The radio mast has been lowered to allow the vessel to pass under a bridgeCredit:Andrew Milligan/PA “If you look at all the premier nations around the world, why is it that every nation in the top tier is investing billions of dollars in aircraft carriers? Is it just us, or has everyone got it wrong? The reason being is that they provide the government, very simply, with an incredibly flexible tool. It’s not just about war-fighting. This is about deterrence, coercion, signalling, proving a huge sea base for disaster relief, humanitarian assistance, defence engagement.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. He said 2021 “will be the first time we will deploy this ship in anger”. A Royal Navy warship is expected to escort HMS Queen Elizabeth, while shore-based helicopters look out for submarines as commanders try out the warship in the North Sea and Moray Firth.Cdr Fiona Percival, head of logistics on the ship said: “[The Russians] will come and look, but they look at everything.”Cdr Mark Deller, commander air, said the ship would be accompanied by a frigate or destroyer. Commanding Officer Captain Jerry Kyd onboard the HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircraft Carrier at Rosyth DockyardCredit:Getty The warship under steam off the coast of ScotlandCredit:Andrew Milligan/PA The carrier’s flight deck is more than four acres in size HMS Queen Elizabeth is pulled by tugs under the Forth Rail Bridge in the Firth of ForthCredit:PA A simulation of the 65,000 ton vessel being squeezed out of the basin at RosythCredit:BAE Systems plc Ian Booth, managing director of the defence industry alliance behind the ships, said: “The incident with the fire in London really brings it home to you, you don’t take chances with any incident on the ship, whether it be flooding or fire.” Sailors and engineers have worked round the clock getting the vessel ready. A total of 1,000 sailors and contractors will be onboard for the first six weeks of testing. Crew have spent hours each day carrying out safety drills for fires, flooding and personnel overboard. More than 650 doors and hatches have been checked to ensure they are watertight and fire safe.last_img read more

Battered husband secretly filmed wife attacking him as he feared police would

first_img“A couple of months prior to these offences the complainant installed a camera to record her behaviour because he didn’t think anyone would believe his story. She posted a comment on a photo of Mr Tweedy saying: “fab holiday and will hopefully go back this year…..and yes he does look good!” Neil Tweedy with wife HelenCredit:Cavendish Press Neil Tweedy (with wife Helen A battered husband installed a hidden camera in his home to film his wife attacking him as he feared police wouldn’t believe him, a court has heard.Neil Tweedy, 45, had endured violence from wife Helen since 2005, including an assault on their wedding night in 2008 where she kicked, punched and smothered him with a duvet, before making him sleep on the sofa.Defence lawyer James Street told the court that school teacher Mrs Tweedy had “significant mental health problems” caused by binge drinking.Mr Tweedy eventually reported the crimes after Mrs Tweedy continued the abuse after the birth of their daughter, now four.The victim secretly recorded the assaults at the couple’s £200,000 semi-detached home in Greater Manchester because he was afraid that police would not believe him without evidence. Over a two-month period three incidents of Mrs Tweedy slapping her husband over the head and swearing at him were caught on camera, once in front of their daughter.The couple met 16 years ago and appeared happy to family and friends. Facebook pictures showed them holidaying in Amsterdam and the Greek island of Zakynthos. Helen Tweedy leaving Manchester Magistrates' Courtcenter_img At Manchester magistrates court, Mrs Tweedy admitted three charges of common assault by beating and was given a restraining order banning her from contacting her husband, as well as 120 hours of unpaid work.Prosecutor Robin Lynch said: “The first three years were described by the complainant as ‘amazing’ but the defendant began to drink in private and there sometimes there was some controlling behavior.”In 2005 on a family holiday they were with the defendant’s parents and she shoved and pushed him and slapped him in the face. The complainant said from then on it became a regular thing.“Despite this, they married in 2008 but that night he was assaulted and kicked and punched to the head and body. She placed a duvet over his head for the assault to continue and he slept on the sofa.”A couple of months prior to these offences the complainant installed a camera to record her behavior because he didn’t think anyone would believe his story. That recorded three incidents.”On the 2nd of June the defendant was verbally abusive, shouting and swearing and slapped him round the head. On the 21st of July she was sat on the sofa with the child and started physically abusing him. On the 31st of July the child was asleep upstairs and the defendant was again abusive. Mr Tweedy later said: “Helen is a fantastic and brilliant teacher and gets to work for 7.30am and doesn’t leave till 7.30pm. She’s just so hard working.”The problem was just alcohol, she was admitted to hospital twice in the past year and could have died. Something had to change.”Hopefully now she can get the hope she needs.”One in three victims of domestic violence is male, according to a 2017 study by Mankind Initiative, a charity helping men escape domestic violence.The research also found that male victims are three times more likely than female victims not to tell anyone about the abuse. Helen Tweedy leaving Manchester Magistrates’ CourtCredit:Cavendish Press Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

An egg a day may keep heart disease away according to new

“The researchers accounted for many dietary and other behaviours in their analyses, but it is important to emphasise that eggs are not eaten in isolation, and overall healthy or unhealthy dietary patterns will always matter.”Victoria Taylor, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation, said: “It’s possible that the lower risk of cardiovascular disease seen in those who consumed eggs on a daily basis may have been caused by something else in their diet or lifestyle – rather than a specific cause and effect.”The study was also carried out on a middle-aged Chinese population so the results may not be directly applicable to a UK population.”However, these findings may be reassuring for people who like to ‘go to work on an egg’ and are consistent with current advice in the UK; that eggs can be included as part of a healthy, balanced diet.” The study followed more than 400,000 people in China The results are consistent with current UK advice that eggs can be part of a balanced diet Haemorrhagic strokes, caused by bleeding in and around the brain, are less common than ischaemic strokes, which are the result of a blockage. The group were followed up around nine years later, with daily egg consumption found to be linked to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease overall.Those who ate up to one a day had a 26% lower risk of haemorrhagic stroke, 28% lower risk of haemorrhagic stroke death and an 18% lower risk of cardiovascular disease death, the study found.There was also a 12% reduction in the risk of ischaemic heart disease, or coronary heart disease, in those consuming an estimated 5.32 eggs a week compared to those eating around two. But they have a higher prevalence rate in China than in high-income countries.”This present study finds that there is an association between moderate level of egg consumption (up to one egg per day) and a lower cardiac event rate,” the authors wrote.”Our findings contribute scientific evidence to the dietary guidelines with regard to egg consumption for the healthy Chinese adult.” The results are consistent with current UK advice that eggs can be part of a balanced diet Professor Nita Forouhi, of the MRC epidemiology unit at the University of Cambridge, said: “The take home message of this research from a large study from China is that at the very least up to one egg a day is not linked with raised cardiovascular risk, and at best up to one egg a day may even have health benefits. The study followed more than 400,000 people in ChinaCredit:AFP Previous studies examining the impact of eggs on health have been inconsistent and most have found insignificant associations between consumption and coronary heart disease or stroke.Commenting on the findings, Tim Chico, professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Sheffield, said: “It is very difficult to determine the part any single element of our diet plays in our risk of developing heart disease.”This study has shown that people who eat more eggs have lower rates of a range of diseases including heart attack and stroke.”It is important to stress that this does not prove that eating eggs protects against these diseases, as there may be other differences between the people eating more eggs that cause these differences.” The 1960s advertising slogan, “Go to work on an egg,” may have offered sound dietary advice, according to new research that found an egg a day may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.Consumption of up to one egg daily was linked with lower rates of strokes and heart disease, according to the research published in journal Heart.Daily consumers also had a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease when compared to those who did not eat eggs.The researchers, from Peking University Health Science Centre, examined data from 416,213 participants in China.At the start of the study, 13.1% of participants reported daily consumption of eggs and 9.1% said they never or rarely ate them. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Removing shoes when entering the house could help people stay slim scientists

By 2025, two thirds of Britons are expected to be overweight or obese  Removing shoes when entering the house and swapping carpet for wooden floors could help people stay slim because it prevents environmental chemicals accumulating in the house, scientists have claimed.According to new research presented at the European Society of Endocrinology in Barcelona, everyday products contain ‘obesogens’ which interfere with hormones and promote the build up of a fat in the body, Researchers at the Universities of Aveiro and Beira Interior in Portugal carried out a review into the current surveys and studies on obesogenic chemicals to see where people are most likely to come into contact with them.They found that diet, house dust, and everyday products such as cleaning chemicals, kitchenware or cosmetics are the biggest sources of contaminants.In light of the findings, the researchers have made seven recommendations to minimise the build of obesogens at home. They include choosing fresh, organic and pesticide free food over processed products, particularly those containing a long list of ingredients on the backThey also recommended removing shoes when entering the house to avoid bringing contaminants indoors, vacuuming often to stop chemicals building up in house dust and removing carpets at work and home, replacing them with wooden floors. By 2025, two thirds of Britons are expected to be overweight or obese Credit:Clara Molden PA  Lead author Dr Ana Catarina Sousa said: “These are baby steps to achieve an obesogen-free lifestyle but a really good start. Essentially, watch your diet and get rid of the dust at home.”Adults ingest about 50mg of dust every day, and children twice as much, so keeping the house clean is a very effective measure. And use a humid cloth to dust your furniture, rather than a cleaning product that may contain more of these chemicals.”Obesity rates in Britain have doubled over the past two decades and 63 per cent of adults are now considered to be overweight or obese, a figure that is expected to rise to two thirds by 2025. Finally they advise switching from plastic containers to glass or aluminium and avoid synthetic cleaning products. Previous studies have shown the hormone disrupting chemicals are present in pesticides, plastics, flame retardants, repellent coatings on kitchen utensils and clothes, and artificial sweeteners.However British experts said more evidence was needed before lifestyle changes could be recommended.Prof Russell Viner, President of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH), said : “For some medical reasons such as protection against allergies, yes, it’s advised to keep a dust free home and so too is removing shoes to avoid bringing in dirt from outside, but these things will not make you a healthy weight. “”Only a balanced diet and regular exercise will do that.”Commenting on the study Dr Peter Jenkinson, Toxicologist and Managing Director, Consultancy for Environmental & Human Toxicology and Risk Assessment (CEHTRA) France and UK, added: “Some of the recommendations given are sensible but not for reasons of obesity avoidance. Choosing local products, for example, can reduce carbon emissions.“There is no evidence given in this abstract that indicates that adopting any of these recommendations will actually reduce obesity.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Inmate given 57p in compensation after his magazine was damaged by prison

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A prisoner was reimbursed 57 pence as compensation after a magazine they owned was lost or damaged by prison staff, as new figures reveal that over £1 million has been given out to convicts for lost property over the past five years.Over 13,000 taxpayer-funded payouts have been made since 2013, with claims including damage to tracksuit bottoms (£10), a T-shirt (£3) and a stereo (£150).Other reimbursements include lost or damaged tobacco (£20.80), a DVD player (£68.99), and a watch (£10).The statistics, obtained by the Press Association via a Freedom of Information request to the Ministry of Justice, show £1,075,594.80 has been paid out since 2013, while the number and value of payments went up in the last financial year despite a watchdog highlighting the problem.Authorised belongings can be held in possession, meaning the prisoner keeps the item on them or in their cell, while excess items can be stored locally at the jail or at a central depot.Rules allow for inmates to lodge complaints and claims for compensation when property is lost or damaged.Last  year, it was found that in the four years between 2013 and 2017, lost property claims totaled £833,541.02.At the time, Prisons and Probation Ombudsman Nigel Newcomen called on the prison service to “get a grip” on the way property is managed.Now, it has been found that the following year, 2,666 awards were made in relation to prisoners’ belongings in 2017-18, at a total cost of £220,053.78.Conservative MP Bob Neill, who chairs the Commons Justice Committee, said: “This issue has been raised at a number of our recent prison visits, so these figures do not come as a surprise.”Property is a regular source of complaint to both the Prison and Probation Ombudsman and independent monitoring boards.”Until prisons properly follow the clear guidance from the Ombudsman, scarce resources, not to mention taxpayers’ money, will continue to be wasted.”Prisons need to sort it out to ensure that they have an adequate system for property recording.”John O’Connell, chief executive of the TaxPayers’ Alliance said: “This increase in payments to prisoners for lost and damaged property will concern many taxpayers across the country.”Either the authorities are failing to treat prisoners at a standard they are legally required to, or they’re giving out compensation payments too easily – both at the expense of hard-pressed taxpayers.”A Prison Service spokeswoman said: “We successfully defend two thirds of all compensation cases brought against us by prisoners.”Where compensation is awarded, we always seek to ensure that payments are offset against outstanding debts owed to the courts and victims.”In addition, a programme of work is underway to prevent the causes of claims to allow us to better protect taxpayers’ money.” read more

Shoreham disaster families say they have been let down by the justice

Andrew Hill outside the Old Bailey Described as a competent, “safety conscious” pilot and an “absolute gentleman”, he dismissed prosecutors’ claims he took risks, saying he was not “cavalier” and took a “very structured, disciplined approach” to display flying.He told jurors he held back from flights he was not comfortable with and said the “primary aim” of displays was to “avoid risk”. But Hill conceded he had only limited experience in the Hunter.He told the court there may have been gaps in his training on what were termed “basic” details of how to fly the plane.Hill also said he had not read some of the guidance notes on how to safely and properly operate the aircraft.Youngest victim’s mother ‘let down’ by verdictThe mother of the youngest Shoreham Airshow crash victim said she feels “let down” by the justice system after the pilot was cleared of manslaughter charges.A jury found Andrew Hill not guilty of the 11 counts over the 2015 crash.An official Government report into the accident, published in 2017, found the crash was caused by pilot error when Mr Hill flew too low and too slowly while carrying out the bent loop manoeuvre, and could have been avoided.Leslye Polito, who lost her son Daniele in the crash, said: “I feel extremely disappointed, very upset and primarily let down by the justice system when someone who has clearly made some very bad errors of judgment is allowed to walk free.”The 23-year-old builder left behind two young children, one of whom he never had chance to meet. Daniele Polito Mrs Polito, 66, of Goring in West Sussex, said: “The whole fact that it was avoidable, that was the hardest bit to consider and process. It’s still the hardest bit.””Bye mum, love you” were the last words Mrs Polito heard her youngest son say, as she had so many times before when he left the house.That day he had been at work with 24-year-old Matt Jones, who also died in the crash. Their boss had let them leave early to enjoy the hot weather and they were driving to the beach in Mr Jones’s car.Daniele was identified five after the crash by his unique tattoos – which included a design dedicated to his son Georgio who was barely three when his father died.Mrs Polito said: “If there’s anything good about it, which there isn’t, it’s that it was all instant. It helps to know that.”One just learns to live each day as it comes and take every day and live as normally as one can.”Every birthday, Christmas, Father’s Day – it doesn’t matter what they are, they are all equally as difficult as the anniversary (of the incident).”Daniele was never able to meet his youngest son, Jaxson, who was born after he died, Mrs Polito said. He began studying engineering and then transferred to computer science, graduating with an honours degree in 1985.Going straight into the RAF afterwards, he won a competition when flying a Jet Provost and was a top performing student.He was selected – or as he put it “creamed off the top” – to become an instructor.Training in combat, he took part in active service for a month in the 1990s, monitoring no-fly zones in northern Iraq. The families of the men killed in the Shoreham Airshow disaster have said they have been “let down by the justice system” after the pilot was cleared of manslaughter. Andrew Hill, 54, was accused of killing 11 people when his Hawker Hunter jet ploughed into the A27 in West Sussex.The pilot had been attempting to perform a loop when disaster struck during his display at the Shoreham Airshow on August 22, 2015.The prosecution had claimed that Mr Hill had a “cavalier attitude” to safety and had previously taken unnecessary risks during airshows.But his defence team claimed he had been affected by the G Forces which had caused a subtle “cognitive impairment” related to hypoxia and the jury returned unanimous not guilty verdicts.Leslye Polito, who lost her son Daniele in the crash, said: “I feel extremely disappointed, very upset and primarily let down by the justice system when someone who has clearly made some very bad errors of judgment is allowed to walk free.”The 23-year-old builder – the disaster’s youngest victim – left behind two young children, one of whom he never had chance to meet.Sue and Phil Grimstone, whose son Matthew died in the crash, said they were “devastated the jury have reached this verdict”. They said their son had “no interest” in airshows, and suggested they should be banned. In the statement released through Sussex Police, they said: “Matthew had no interest in air shows, he could not have cared less. Knowing he died because an aircraft was being flown for fun, for the entertainment of others makes it even harder to bear.”It has to be remembered that this is a leisure industry, it is not a necessity.” He said it was the fact he was biased that was the concern, not that he had been in favour of the defendant.Another woman joined the panel in his place.But part way through the trial the jury had to be reduced to 11 – leaving seven women and four men – after another juror was discharged due to ill health.Shoreham Airshow timeline: the key eventsA timeline of the Shoreham Airshow crash and developments in the investigations:August 22, 2015, 1.22pm: A vintage Hawker Hunter jet flown by pilot Andrew Hill crashes mid-stunt on to the A27 at Shoreham in West Sussex during an airshow, killing 11 men. Hill survives the crash with serious injuries after he was thrown clear from the wreckage. He is taken to hospital and put in an induced coma before being discharged a month later.August 23: The Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB), Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and Sussex Police all launch probes into the crash.August 24:  The CAA temporarily grounds all Hawker Hunters and limits vintage jets to flypasts during airshows.September 2: The identities of all 11 victims are officially confirmed as an inquest is opened and adjourned by West Sussex senior coroner Penelope Schofield. The jury deliberated for just over seven hours.Families of the victims have spoken about feeling “let down” by the verdict, suggesting air show should be banned in light of the disaster.  Who is Andrew Hill?Shoreham Airshow crash pilot Andrew Grenville Hill was a Cambridge graduate who was top of the class in the RAF, winning competitions for his flying.A captain with British Airways until the tragedy, he grew up in Kent and went to Tonbridge School, a private boarding school that counts Norman Heatley – who turned penicillin into usable medicine – among its alumni.Telling the court he was “reasonably academic” and an A-grade pupil at school, Hill was allowed to enrol at Cambridge University without taking the entrance exam, attending Christ’s College. He also started to fly a Harrier – capable of vertical take-off and landing – and won an award for his work and ideas on improving aircraft safety procedures.Turning to civil aviation, he became a commercial pilot, starting with Virgin Atlantic before moving to British Airways and progressing to the most senior position of captain.He gained a reputation as an experienced pilot but nearly died at the side of the road after the Hawker Hunter he was flying in 2015 crashed in a fireball on to the A27 in West Sussex.Hill, who now lives in Sandon, Buntingford, in Hertfordshire, suffered serious injuries and was placed into an induced coma before being discharged from hospital a month later.He had fractured his nose, ribs and part of his lower spine and suffered a collapsed lung and serious bruising among other injuries. Daniele Polito June 20: The police say the criminal investigation is 95% complete at a pre-inquest hearing.November 1: Families hit out after their application for exceptional case funding legal aid, which will pay for costs incurred when lawyers represent them at the inquest, was rejected. Prime Minister Theresa May asks the Lord Chancellor David Lidington to intervene. November 22: A memorial service takes place to honour the victims.December 15: Hill is interviewed by police officers from the Surrey and Sussex Major Crime Team under caution after voluntarily attending a station near his Hertfordshire home but is not arrested.April 14, 2016: The CAA says it is tightening rules for all show organisers when it publishes its final report in the wake of the crash.July 8: It emerges police are investigating Hill for manslaughter by gross negligence and endangerment of life under air navigation laws.January 24, 2017: The CAA agrees to accept all the safety measures made by the AAIB in the wake of the tragedy, meaning stricter safety rules for pilots and organisers, after it initially rejected almost half of the recommendations.March 3: The AAIB publishes its findings in a 219-page report following one of its longest investigations in recent years. Investigators found the disaster was caused by the pilot flying too slow and too low during a loop manoeuvre. Matthew Grimstone was one of those killed Andrew Hill He had left work early and was travelling to the beach with a colleague when flames engulfed their car after the plane crashed on the A27. Andrew Hill This ignored the directions given in court, Mr Justice Edis said, adding: “That is a clear statement of bias.”I made the order that he was not to come back into the building. I don’t want him talking to jurors and spreading that bias.” November 30: The coroner says prosecutors have been provided with a complete case file and are to decide whether criminal charges will be brought.January 24, 2018: A pre-inquest review is postponed until March 26 to allow prosecutors more time to consider the case file.March 21: Prosecutors meet victims’ families at police headquarters in Lewes, East Sussex, to inform them of their charging decision. The CPS announces it is charging Hill with manslaughter by gross negligence and endangerment of an aircraft.May 15: Hill pleads not guilty to 11 charges of manslaughter by gross negligence and one of recklessly or negligently endangering an aircraft under aviation laws.January 16, 2019: Hill stands trial at the Old Bailey accused of manslaughter by gross negligence. Prosecutors drop the final charge of endangering an aircraft.March 8: The jury deliver their verdict. Hill is cleared. Speaking for the first time in public since the incident when he gave evidence at the trial, he denied having a “cavalier” attitude, insisting he was known for his safety record.He has never watched footage that captured the moment of the crash and lowered his head when is was played to jurors.The court heard this was on medical advice from his doctor over fears of how it would affect him.He is now in good health, with medical checks before and after the crash showing no signs of a condition that would have affected him at the time, the court heard.The 54-year-old spent much of the proceedings taking notes while sitting in the dock or leaning down to follow documents of evidence.Wearing a dark suit for the proceedings, his manner appeared jovial as he made a few jokes while standing in the witness box giving his testimony. They added: “Why are we allowing any form of aerobatics to be performed when there is now doubt concerning any pilot’s ability to avoid becoming cognitively impaired from the normal G forces that will be experienced during an aerobatic display?”Matthew had no interest in air shows, he could not have cared less. Knowing he died because an aircraft was being flown for fun, for the entertainment of others makes it even harder to bear. “It has to be remembered that this is a leisure industry, it is not a necessity.”Juror discharged for bias during trialA juror was discharged for saying he would “never” consider convicting anybody over the Shoreham Airshow crash.It happened on the first day of the trial, after the jury had been sworn in and before the prosecution had opened its case, but can only be reported now the case has concluded.The man was one of five on the original panel, alongside seven women.Mr Justice Edis told the court after the jury were selected that the man admitted to staff he knew something about the incident, before he had learnt any details about the case from court.The judge said the man remarked that he was “never going to find anybody guilty” because it was an accident and “they could say what they like but he was never going to change his mind”. Video footage played at the Old Bailey showed the jet exploding into a ball of flames as it came down.Hill, who was thrown from the cockpit wreckage, was seriously injured and told medics he had “blacked out”, the court has heard.The defendant, of Sandon, Buntingford, Hertfordshire has denied 11 charges of manslaughter by gross negligence.Mr Justice Edis sent the jury out to deliberate on its verdicts on Wednesday afternoon, and returned on Friday with their verdict.  Speaking outside of court, Mr Hill said he was “truly sorry for the part I played in their deaths”, and said it was a day he would “never forget”.The victims are Maurice Abrahams, 76; Dylan Archer, 42; Tony Brightwell, 53; Matthew Grimstone, 23; Matt Jones, 24; Graham Mallinson, 72; Daniele Polito, 23; Mark Reeves, 53; Jacob Schilt, 23; Richard Smith, 26; and Mark Trussler, 54, who all lived in Sussex. Matthew Grimstone was one of those killed Although they have “two lovely little boys to carry on his name”, she said this was “bittersweet”, adding: “We have that but we don’t have him and he won’t get to see either of them grow up.”We will make sure they know all about their daddy. We talk about Daniele all the time, every day.”Airshows ‘should be banned’, suggest victim’s familyIn a statement issued via Sussex Police, Sue and Phil Grimstone, whose son Matthew died in the crash, said: “Obviously we are devastated the jury have reached this verdict.”There seems to be no justice for our son Matthew and all 11 men who died in such tragic circumstances.”We were always told by the police that to prove guilty due to “gross negligence” the bar was set very high. Despite having compelling evidence from the cockpit footage and expert witnesses, it was not enough.” Andrew Hill outside the Old BaileyCredit:Kirsty O’Connor/PA As the verdict was read out in court some of the families of those who died sobbed, while others looked resigned. Mr Hill stood in the dock as the unanimous verdicts were given.It can now be revealed that during the trial one of the jurors was discharged after saying he would never consider convicting anyone over the Shoreham disaster.Mr Justice Edis acknowledged the families were “enormously upset” as he praised the “very dignified way” they conducted themselves throughout the trial Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

National Trust scraps horse trials which Royals have ridden in for 40

Zara Tindall has ridden at Belton Horse Trials in the past We are devastated at the loss of Belton International Horse Trials. This decision was announced to us yesterday and came as a shock to the whole team.Our statement is attached pic.twitter.com/BQXj2qQLsU— Bede Events (@bedeevents) April 30, 2019 The National Trust has scrapped a prestigious horse trials event in which Royals have competed in for 40 years citing concerns for earthworms.The Belton Horse Trials is looking for a new home after officials said horse hooves treading on worms and other “soil loving creatures” means the ground could become boggy and waterlogged.Worms play a vital role as aerators of soil, and helping grassland grow.The decision came as organisers of the three-day international event at the Lincolnshire stately home of Belton House began planning its 40th anniversary celebrations for 2020.This year’s horse show, which attracted around 20,000 people to the 1,300 acre site in March, attracted a top field, including Olympic riders Pippa Funnell, Laura Collett and Piggy French. In 2017, Zara Tindall took a runners-up spot.However, the National Trust said the very “size and scale” of the event in Grantham is “now at odds” with conservation at the Grade I listed site.British Eventing claimed that the “difficult decision” to put the event to bed was “very disappointing” and the local authority, South Kesteven District Council, added that the trials make a “significant contribution” to the local economy. Zara Tindall has ridden at Belton Horse Trials in the pastCredit:PA Despite calls of concern, Ian Cooper, general manager at Belton House stood by the National Trust’s decision.He said: “Unfortunately, it has come to a point where we can’t carry on.”Mr Cooper said horse hooves and large vehicles had caused significant soil compaction across parts of the Grade I listed parkland, impacting wildlife and historic trees.He added: “We recognise the significance of the Horse Trials and their place in Belton’s recent history, and have therefore not come to this decision lightly.“The core purpose of the National Trust is to protect this historic place for future generations, and we must honour that commitment.”Belton House was gifted to the National Trust in 1983 after it was built for Sir John Brownlow in the 1680s. “Surely the National Trust have a responsibility to protect such events and build awareness of the countryside for the nation.  A more rounded organisation is one that listens to its members and the public and is strong in character.” North Lincolnshire Riding Club also spoke of the loss to the area. “It is a huge loss for the Lincolnshire equestrian community after so many years being able to watch the best competitors at the top of their sport,” said Mrs Gale, the club’s secretary. “We can only hope that another fairly accessible venue can be sourced so we don’t have to always travel miles to enjoy the sport.”Mother-of-three Rachel Good, who travelled to Belton House with her teenage daughter who competed in the equestrian event this year, told The Telegraph she is disappointed that they won’t be returning soon.She said: “We went for the first time this year, it was an absolutely brilliant and beautiful event. “I’m very sad that we can’t go back and I feel desperately sorry for the organisers who had no notice of the decision. “It is very special to compete and use a wonderful and historic landscape through our sport and leisure activity. By doing this, the National Trust are making a facility stand even more still in time.”Another self-professed equestrian supporter, Jo Mawditt, said she has contacted the National Trust to complain and urged them to reconsider the decision.“This event is a highlight of not only the eventing calendar but also supports the local economy, as well as gives the general public the opportunity to experience the thrill of man and horse in harmony,” Ms Mawditt said. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Children should be taught about ethnic minorities contribution to history Education Secretary says

Children should be taught about the contribution that ethnic minorities have made to history, the Education Secretary has said.His comments come amid calls to “decolonise” the curriculum by teaching subjects from a less white, male and Euro-centric perspective.This week, vice-Chancellors said that universities must review courses and where relevant, include more perspectives from ethnic minorities, in order to help black students close the attainment gap with their white peers.A report by Universities UK (UUK) found that campuses need to become “racially diverse and inclusive environments” if black, Asian and minority ethnic are to succeed academically.Asked whether he supports the UUK initiative, Damian Hinds said: “History is history, and things that have happened have happened.  “You learn from them in multiple ways, including learning from bad things that have happened in history, and bad things that have happened in our own history.”  He said it is “absolutely right and proper” that at school as well as university, children learn “a wider variety of history than we used to when we were at school”.Mr Hinds went on to say that pupils nowadays “learn about people who we didn’t learn about when we were at school. There’s no reason why we shouldn’t have learned about them – we just didn’t, because the curriculum was narrowed in certain ways. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “And I think it is a good thing that it is broad, and it is a good thing that people of all sorts of backgrounds, and all sorts of ethnicities and so on, hear about people from a diverse range of backgrounds and the contribution they have made to history.”Campaigns aimed at “decolonising” the curriculum have gained pace at universities in recent years, with students and academics calling for syllabi to be re-designed. A teacher union chief has previously said that schools must look beyond “dead white men” to make the curriculum more diverse.Dr Mary Bousted, joint general secretary of the National Education Union (NEU), has criticised the national curriculum for failing to include enough black and female writers.“As an English teacher, I have no problem with Shakespeare, with Pope, with Dryden, with Shelley,” she said at an education summit last year. “But I knew in a school where there are 38 first languages taught other than English that I had to have Afro-Caribbean writers in that curriculum, I had to have Indian writers, I had to have Chinese writers to enable pupils to foreshadow their lives in the curriculum.” read more

Social media linked to increased risk of mental health problems

Dr Rina Dutta, senior clinical lecturer at King’s College London (KCL) and consultant psychiatrist, said: “A major strength of this study compared to previous research is that the researchers took into account mental health problems the young people already had a year prior to the measurement of social media use.”This largely overcomes the ‘what came first – mental health problem or high social media use?’ question.”The study looked at two types of behaviours that can indicate mental health problems: Internalising and externalising.Internalising can involve social withdrawal or difficulty coping with anxiety or depression.Externalising can include aggression or disobeying instructions.The study found that the use of social media for at least three hours a day was associated with around twice the risk of mental health problems, compared with those who shunned it. Lead author Kira Riehm said: “Many existing studies have found a link between digital or social media use and adolescent health, but few look at this association across time.”We cannot conclude that social media causes mental health problems, but we do think that less time on social media may be better for teens’ health.”The study found that fewer than 17 per cent of adolescents did not use social media.Of those that did, 32 per cent spent less than 30 minutes a day, 31 per cent spent 30 minutes to three hours, 12 per cent spent three to six hours and 8 per cent spent more than six hours per day.Ms Riehm said: “Social media has the ability to connect adolescents who may be excluded in their daily life.”We need to find a better way to balance the benefits of social media with possible negative health outcomes.” Teenagers who spend more than three hours a day on social media may have double the risk of mental health problems as those who shun it, research suggests.The study of more than 6,000 children aged 12 to 15 found those who used social media more heavily were more likely to report issues such as depression, anxiety and loneliness, as well as aggression and anti-social behaviour, than teenagers who did not use social media.The findings held true even when researchers took into account mental health problems experienced by any young person in the year before they were asked about social media use.The research, from a team at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Maryland, was published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.Some previous studies have suggested no link between poorer mental health and screen time. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Bandits create havoc in Berbice

…rob 6 familiesBandits went on a rampage at the Glasgow New Housing Scheme on the East Bank of Berbice (Region 6, East Berbice-Corentyne) over the weekend, creating havoc for residents as they attempted to enter, or were successful in entering, six homes.Four homes in the scheme were broken into on Sunday morning. In the previous week, two other homes were broken into, and victims had harrowing encounters with the bandits.In the wee hours of Monday, bandits invaded Lot 1724 Cracks Ville, Glasgow New Housing Scheme, EBB. Owner of the home, Clement John, explained that all of the rooms in the house are sealed, so no one heard when bandits prised open the back door with a crowbar. He gave no details of what was taken.At Sohan Ramdeen’s Lot 890 Glasgow New Housing Scheme home, louvre panes were removed but the bandits were unable to gain entry into the home. One occupant explained that he had heard the dogs barking and had thought that another animal was in the yard. According to reports, a can of sardines had been punctured and placed in the yard to distract the dogs. Ramdeen explained that it was not until sunrise that he discovered the louvre panes missing from his home.At about 00:30h on that same Monday, bandits attempted to hammer their way into another Cracks Ville home, despite screams from the occupants.  “I jump up from my sleep when I hear. So I listened to hear if (there was) any other sound; but the next noise wasn’t so hard.Then I wake up my son and tell him that (bandits attacking) this house, and he say, ‘No, is cat.’… He decided to go and check the cameras, and then he see that three of the cameras turn in different directions, and so he go to the bedroom window and start screaming,” the homeowner said.Despite hearing the occupants of that home raising an alarm, the bandits continued to force their way into the building, which houses a shop. Fortunately, they could not penetrate the grill door that prohibits entry into the building, although they had wrenched open a door leading to the lower flat of the building. And the intruders fled after several residents responded to the cries of the besieged home occupants.The shop owner said the family had received information in December that persons were planning to burgle their home, and on the night they had received that information a vehicle was observed passing the home ten times, but vanished when police arrived in the area.The bandits could not gain entry into this homeThe early Monday morning bandit rampage also included an attack on teacher Debra Ward’s home. She said she was aware that at least one person was in her home at about 2:30h on Monday. She said the intruder pushed open her bedroom door, but she sprang out of bed and armed herself with a cutlass, causing the male intruder to escape through the front door.She later discovered that one Government laptop, a cellular phone and approximately $6000, most of which belongs to the school, had been taken from her home. She also discovered that a crowbar had been used to prise open the back door and grill of her home.Two other homes in the East Bank Berbice community had last Wednesday been broken into. Businessman Chris Hicks said the bandits had managed to make their way only into the lower flat of his home, from whence they removed almost $2M worth of equipment.He explained that during that attack, the bandits’ efforts to gain access to the upper flat of his home were thwarted because of the way the building is constructed. However, a masked man had climbed onto a part of the roof and had come face-to-face with him; and there was only a glass window separating the two men. According to Hicks, the man and his accomplices immediately fled the scene.And even as police responded to the Hicks report, three masked men burgled an unlicensed liquor restaurant that is situated in the same street where Hicks lives. Reports are that the bandits confiscated close to $200,000 in cash and a similar amount in jewelry from the shop owner and her school-age daughter before fleeing the scene.Having broken into that residence, the bandits allegedly woke up the sleeping occupant, Nadira, and told her not to sleep so soundly in the future, even as they demanded more cash and valuables.Police are investigating all these reports.  Several persons have already been arrested. (Guyana Times) Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedArmed bandits invade home of NA woman in robberyJanuary 8, 2019In “Crime”Criminal gang creating havoc in New Amsterdam – residents report several daring robberies recentlyJune 22, 2016In “Crime”Ex-cop among five remandedMay 8, 2017In “Court”,…rob 6 familiesBandits went on a rampage at the Glasgow New Housing Scheme on the East Bank of Berbice (Region 6, East Berbice-Corentyne) over the weekend, creating havoc for residents as they attempted to enter, or were successful in entering, six homes.Four homes in the scheme were broken into on Sunday morning. In the previous week, two other homes were broken into, and victims had harrowing encounters with the bandits.In the wee hours of Monday, bandits invaded Lot 1724 Cracks Ville, Glasgow New Housing Scheme, EBB. Owner of the home, Clement John, explained that all of the rooms in the house are sealed, so no one heard when bandits prised open the back door with a crowbar. He gave no details of what was taken.At Sohan Ramdeen’s Lot 890 Glasgow New Housing Scheme home, louvre panes were removed but the bandits were unable to gain entry into the home. One occupant explained that he had heard the dogs barking and had thought that another animal was in the yard. According to reports, a can of sardines had been punctured and placed in the yard to distract the dogs. Ramdeen explained that it was not until sunrise that he discovered the louvre panes missing from his home.At about 00:30h on that same Monday, bandits attempted to hammer their way into another Cracks Ville home, despite screams from the occupants.  “I jump up from my sleep when I hear. So I listened to hear if (there was) any other sound; but the next noise wasn’t so hard.Then I wake up my son and tell him that (bandits attacking) this house, and he say, ‘No, is cat.’… He decided to go and check the cameras, and then he see that three of the cameras turn in different directions, and so he go to the bedroom window and start screaming,” the homeowner said.Despite hearing the occupants of that home raising an alarm, the bandits continued to force their way into the building, which houses a shop. Fortunately, they could not penetrate the grill door that prohibits entry into the building, although they had wrenched open a door leading to the lower flat of the building. And the intruders fled after several residents responded to the cries of the besieged home occupants.The shop owner said the family had received information in December that persons were planning to burgle their home, and on the night they had received that information a vehicle was observed passing the home ten times, but vanished when police arrived in the area.The bandits could not gain entry into this homeThe early Monday morning bandit rampage also included an attack on teacher Debra Ward’s home. She said she was aware that at least one person was in her home at about 2:30h on Monday. She said the intruder pushed open her bedroom door, but she sprang out of bed and armed herself with a cutlass, causing the male intruder to escape through the front door.She later discovered that one Government laptop, a cellular phone and approximately $6000, most of which belongs to the school, had been taken from her home. She also discovered that a crowbar had been used to prise open the back door and grill of her home.Two other homes in the East Bank Berbice community had last Wednesday been broken into. Businessman Chris Hicks said the bandits had managed to make their way only into the lower flat of his home, from whence they removed almost $2M worth of equipment.He explained that during that attack, the bandits’ efforts to gain access to the upper flat of his home were thwarted because of the way the building is constructed. However, a masked man had climbed onto a part of the roof and had come face-to-face with him; and there was only a glass window separating the two men. According to Hicks, the man and his accomplices immediately fled the scene.And even as police responded to the Hicks report, three masked men burgled an unlicensed liquor restaurant that is situated in the same street where Hicks lives. Reports are that the bandits confiscated close to $200,000 in cash and a similar amount in jewelry from the shop owner and her school-age daughter before fleeing the scene.Having broken into that residence, the bandits allegedly woke up the sleeping occupant, Nadira, and told her not to sleep so soundly in the future, even as they demanded more cash and valuables.Police are investigating all these reports.  Several persons have already been arrested. (Guyana Times) read more