Dyson Unveils His Bladeless Fan w Videos

first_imgUsing ‘Air Multiplier’ technology, air is pushed forward, dragging air from behind and from the sides.Without rotor blades, a smooth airflow is created. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: For detailed information on the design and how the bladeless fan works, visit the Dyson website.© 2009 PhysOrg.com Unlike conventional fans that rely on fan blades to chop the air and push it forward, the bladeless fan technology uses an airflow principle modeled after an airplane wing. Air is pulled into the machine’s cylindrical base using a small brushless motor. The motor’s impeller pushes air into a hollow ring and is then forced out a slit that runs all around the ring. The air is then accelerated into the circular chamber which is called a loop amplifier. The video below illustrates the airflow technology. Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — James Dyson, inventor of the bag-less vacuum cleaners has taken his invention one step further with the unveiling of the bladeless fan. Using ‘Air Multiplier’ technology the bladeless fan pushes 119 gallons of air per second. In an interview with Dyson, he said: “I’ve always been disappointed by fans. Their spinning blades chop up the airflow, causing annoying buffeting. They’re hard to clean and children always want to poke their fingers through the grille. So we’ve developed a new type of fan that doesn’t use blades.” Citation: Dyson Unveils His Bladeless Fan (w/ Videos) (2009, October 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-dyson-unveils-bladeless-fan-videos.html Video: Swine flu health tipslast_img read more

Wolfram Research introduces new programmable document type

first_imgOne unfortunate downside to using the new format, is that in order for a user to receive the benefits of it, they have to download and install a 150MB installer, which then takes up some 500MB of drive space. There’s also the tricky problem of going to all the trouble of programming a document (which the company says is as easy as recording a spreadsheet macro) only to find there aren’t any users out there who can see your results, because they haven’t downloaded the program, much less heard of it.On a positive note, now that Wolfram has shown what is possible, it’s likely Adobe will either license and incorporate the new standard into PDF (CPDF anyone?), or come up with its own way of doing the same thing. Either way, users will certainly benefit in the end, especially if this new technology winds up on cell phones, or especially tablets; being able to manipulate data in a report with our fingertips, sounds like something we should already be able to do. Citation: Wolfram Research introduces new programmable document type (2011, July 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-wolfram-programmable-document.html (PhysOrg.com) — Wolfram Research, the same folks who brought us both Mathematica, and Wolfram Alpha (see here, here, and here), the search computation site, is now announcing via Conrad Wolfram’s blog, that it has designed a new document format that allows for simple programming on the creator end, and interactivity on the user end. Called, appropriately enough, the Computable Document Format (CDF), it takes PDF documents one step further by allowing data embedded in a document to be manipulated in real time. Explore further More information: blog.wolfram.com/2011/07/21/la … a-expand-the-medium/ This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Nitro PDF Reader out to blow away Adobe © 2010 PhysOrg.com While it doesn’t appear, at least for now, that Wolfram intends to compete with Adobe with its new format, it does appear to be sort of a knock on the static nature of the current PDF format.As it stands now, if you download and look at a PDF document, it’s like looking at an image, in that that’s all you can do with it, look and read. With the CDF format however, the person or group who creates the document can embed code in the document t so that when a user downloads it, he or she has the option of manipulating data in that document to taste. As an example, per Wolfram’s blog, say you wrote a paper on the Doppler affect. With a PDF document, you’d lay down your words and then try to come up with a graph/chart/picture that hopefully conveys the sound of a siren changing in pitch, for example, such as an ambulance passing by. With CDF, you could embed code that would allow a user to actually listen to that ambulance, and then by adding changeable parameters, allow them to adjust such things as the speed of the vehicle, to hear the differences that would result; in other words, you’d have a much more dynamic document.last_img read more

Study shows lions got distemper from dogs originally but now there are

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences India scrambles to save tigers from deadly virus (Update) Back in 1994, 30 percent of the lions living in Serengeti National Park died from an outbreak of distemper, which came as quite a shock to park managers—until then it was believed that cats could not catch the disease, which is normally associated with dogs. A domestic dog vaccination program was subsequently implemented to curb the spread of the disease, which met with great success—in the dogs—outbreaks continued in lions, though it is now less deadly for them, but it has caused biologists to wonder if another animal might be involved in the dispersal of the disease.Distemper, caused by the canine distemper virus (CDV) is a viral disease and has been known to infect dogs, coyotes, foxes, pandas, and a wide variety of other animals, including big cats. It is transmitted through the air, and symptoms generally include a high fever, inflammation of the eyes and nose, and coughing, which is how the disease is spread. Scientists are hoping to learn more about how the disease is transmitted as part of an overall effort to prevent the loss of life wild animals that could lead to extinction in populations already threatened by the encroachment of man.In this new study, the researchers collected serological data obtained from lions in the park between the years 1984 to 2014, and for domestic dogs for the period 1992 to 2012 and then compared the outbreak timelines between the two species. They found that while it appears clear the initial infections in lions came from the domestic dogs, subsequent spikes in lion infections did not—suggesting another species is likely involved. The researchers believe more studies need to be carried out to determine which species that might be. The fear is that it is likely a roving animal such as the hyena, which would mean the virus could spread far and wide very easily. (Phys.org)—A study conducted by an international team of researchers has led to evidence that suggests lions in Africa originally got distemper from domesticated dogs, but now it appears there are other unknown carriers. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the team explains the data analysis they undertook covering distemper infections in a park in Tanzania, and how their findings help better understand how infectious diseases jump between species. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A young child holds a puppy for examination during a CDV vaccination campaign. Credit: Serengeti Carnivore Disease Project. Citation: Study shows lions got distemper from dogs originally but now there are other carriers (2015, January 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-01-lions-distemper-dogs-carriers.html Explore further © 2015 Phys.org A lion with myoclonus, involuntary muscle spasms, brought on by canine distemper virus infection during a 1994 outbreak. Credit: Serengeti Carnivore Disease Project. More information: Dynamics of a morbillivirus at the domestic–wildlife interface: Canine distemper virus in domestic dogs and lions, PNAS, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1411623112AbstractMorbilliviruses cause many diseases of medical and veterinary importance, and although some (e.g., measles and rinderpest) have been controlled successfully, others, such as canine distemper virus (CDV), are a growing concern. A propensity for hostswitching has resulted in CDV emergence in new species, including endangered wildlife, posing challenges for controlling disease in multispecies communities. CDV typically is associated with domestic dogs, but little is known about its maintenance and transmission in species-rich areas or about the potential role of domestic dog vaccination as a means of reducing disease threats to wildlife. We address these questions by analyzing a long-term serological dataset of CDV in lions and domestic dogs from Tanzania’s Serengeti ecosystem. Using a Bayesian state–space model, we show that dynamics of CDV have changed considerably over the past three decades. Initially, peaks of CDV infection in dogs preceded those in lions, suggesting that spill-over from dogs was the main driver of infection in wildlife. However, despite dog-to-lion transmission dominating cross-species transmission models, infection peaks in lions became more frequent and asynchronous from those in dogs, suggesting that other wildlife species may play a role in a potentially complex maintenance community. Widespread mass vaccination of domestic dogs reduced the probability of infection in dogs and the size of outbreaks but did not prevent transmission to or peaks of infection in lions. This study demonstrates the complexity of CDV dynamics in natural ecosystems and the value of long-term, large-scale datasets for investigating transmission patterns and evaluating disease control strategies.last_img read more

Gut biome of monkeys found to change when they are kept in

first_img Explore further (Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has found that when monkeys are kept in captivity, their gut biomes become less diverse. In a paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how they collected fecal samples from monkeys from several sites and compared DNA analysis of organisms living in their guts to learn more about the impact of a changing gut biome. © 2016 Phys.org Red-shanked doucs (Pygathrix nemaeus) on Son Tra Peninsula, Da Nang, Viet Nam. Credit: Bui Van Tan, 2013. Scientists have known for some time that the human gut biome is far less diverse than it once was—most in the field believe this is due both to the use of antibiotics and a reduction in consumption of a variety of fibrous foods. The gut biome helps us digest our foods, which means that the greater diversity of food we eat, the greater diversity of microbes we must have in order to digest them. To gain a better understanding of this relationship, the researchers chose to study the monkey biome because it is possible to obtain samples from individuals that live in the wild as well as in captivity.To compare gut biomes, the researchers collected fecal samples over a nine-month period from wild and zoo-housed red-shanked doucs and mantled howlers—two types of monkey. The samples were then analyzed using DNA sampling techniques to identify all the types of microbes living in a given monkey gut. The team then compared the average number of individual microbes for the groups. They found that the wild monkeys had a much more diverse gut microbiome—they also noted that they ate a far more varied diet; the wild doucs, for example, ate approximately 57 plant species, while those that lived in a Vietnamese zoo were given just 15 species. Those that lived in American zoos were fed just one. The researchers also noted that the gut biomes of the two monkey species living in captivity were far more alike than those that lived in the wild and that the gut biomes of monkeys living in a zoo was very similar to the human gut biome of people eating a western diet.What is still not clear, however, is whether having a less diverse gut biome is good or bad—some evidence has suggested monkeys in captivity experience gut-related health issues, but to date, a comparative analysis of monkeys living in the wild versus those in zoos has not been done. More information: Jonathan B. Clayton et al. Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1521835113AbstractThe primate gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, whose composition is associated with numerous metabolic, autoimmune, and infectious human diseases. Although there is increasing evidence that modern and Westernized societies are associated with dramatic loss of natural human gut microbiome diversity, the causes and consequences of such loss are challenging to study. Here we use nonhuman primates (NHPs) as a model system for studying the effects of emigration and lifestyle disruption on the human gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in two model NHP species, we show that although different primate species have distinctive signature microbiota in the wild, in captivity they lose their native microbes and become colonized with Prevotella and Bacteroides, the dominant genera in the modern human gut microbiome. We confirm that captive individuals from eight other NHP species in a different zoo show the same pattern of convergence, and that semicaptive primates housed in a sanctuary represent an intermediate microbiome state between wild and captive. Using deep shotgun sequencing, chemical dietary analysis, and chloroplast relative abundance, we show that decreasing dietary fiber and plant content are associated with the captive primate microbiome. Finally, in a meta-analysis including published human data, we show that captivity has a parallel effect on the NHP gut microbiome to that of Westernization in humans. These results demonstrate that captivity and lifestyle disruption cause primates to lose native microbiota and converge along an axis toward the modern human microbiome.Press releasecenter_img Patients with multiple sclerosis found to have gut microbe changes This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Citation: Gut biome of monkeys found to change when they are kept in captivity (2016, August 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-08-gut-biome-monkeys-captivity.htmllast_img read more

Uber rape case Defence lawyer unwell

first_imgThe case relating to alleged rape by an Uber cab driver on Monday saw another adjournment, sought by the counsel for the accused driver, in a Delhi court on the ground that the advocate was on bed rest after falling from stairs.Shiv Kumar Yadav’s advocate moved a plea before Additional Sessions Judge Kaveri Baweja seeking adjournment of the case for a few days submitting that he has fallen from stairs at his house yesterday and was having back pain and the doctor has advised him bed rest. Also Read – Company director arrested for swindling Rs 345 croreThe court, after taking on record the plea of advocate D K Mishra, moved through his fellow lawyer, adjourned the case and fixed the matter for March 4 for hearing the defence’s final arguments.The lawyer, however, sought the court to fix the matter for March 7 but the judge refused to adjourn the case for six days as the medical record of the counsel showed he was required to take three days bed rest.The court had earlier also adjourned the case as sought by the defence counsel on the ground that he was busy in the Delhi High Court with an application in the same matter. The court is hearing final arguments of Yadav’s counsel who had earlier claimed that the Delhi Police were “hand-in-glove” with the prosecution to ensure the driver’s conviction and that there were several loopholes in the probe.According to the prosecution, the incident took place on the night of December 5 last year when the victim, a finance executive working in Gurgaon, was heading back home.last_img read more

IISER joins hands with agency in arsenic purification bid

first_imgKolkata: A private agency in collaboration with the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) has come up with a unique device which detects the presence of arsenic in water and purifies it.The private agency, ‘Ado Additives’ will tie up with the state government for working together in removing arsenic from water at various water treatment plants and also in the areas where contamination is high.According to a survey, Bengal has the highest number of arsenic-affected people in the country. The report says there are 83 blocks in eight districts – Bardhaman, Malda, Hooghly, Howrah, Murshidabad, Nadia, North and South 24-Parganas, where ground water is affected by arsenic contamination. There has been an increasing concern of arsenic induced diseases due to exposure to high concentration in deeper levels of groundwater. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsAccording to a report, Bengal topped the list with more than 1.04 crore people being affected by arsenic contamination as in March 2017. Bihar comes second with 16.88 lakh people and Assam comes in the third spot with 14.48 lakh victims. The total number of arsenic-affected people in the country is about 1.48 crore.WHO guideline says that for drinking water, the permissible limit of Arsenic in ground water is .01 mg per liter. In India, the permissible limit in drinking water has recently been revised from .05 mg per liter to .01 mg per liter. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe use of deep tube-wells for water supply in the Ganges delta causes serious problem to a large number of people.The agency has officially unveiled the equipment in a city hotel on Wednesday. It would approach the Public Health Engineering department so that the products could be used for the detection of arsenic and produce arsenic free water.State government has initiated a project in order to provide safe drinking water to more than six lakh people in the arsenic-affected Rajarhat and Haroa block in North 24-Paraganas district and Bhangar II blocks in South 24-Paraganas district. The water treatment plant in New Town will be used to provide safe drinking water to these areas through pipelines.State PHE minister Subrata Mukherjee had earlier claimed that the State has been able to provide safe drinking water to 52% of the arsenic-affected areas in Bengal. A senior official at the PHE department said there is a considerable amount of progress in setting up water treatment plants in the state. The technology for removal of arsenic is rather new and expensive, the progress has been slow, the official maintained.Sanjib Parial, MD and CEO of ‘Ado Additives’ said: “We are planning to distribute and market the products in selected areas in collaboration with the respective department of the state government.”last_img read more

Soulful Rendition at Tihar Jail

first_imgThe atmosphere and setting would not be seen as being conducive to cultural expression and appreciation. Yet, against the grim walls of Tihar Jail, an evening of soulful music and ethereal dance took the inmates to a more sublime plane for some hours on Wednesday evening in an endeavour, promoted by Legends of India, aiming at gradual reformation and rehabilitation of  people who have chosen a life of crime. This is the first time Sangeet Natak Akademi has joined hands with Legends of India to make their initiative a permanent feature.Sonam Kalra, the present day Sufi Queen, unfolded the Gospel of Sufi where many inmates swayed their heads and tapped their feet while some sat still — heads bowed and eyes shut—in deep thought, as if deciphering what lies ahead as the soulful melody of the great Baba Bulleh Shah in Sonam’s voice that reverberated in the air.   Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Her accompanying artists too enthralled the audience with the  instrumental jugalbandi, which was the lime-light of the show. The inmates enthusiastically applauded with every beat of the instrument, enjoyed it thoroughly and some even started dancing with the flow of the Sufi. “They are inmates but were good audience, I must say. Everyone commits mistakes in life irrespective of who is behind the bars and who isn’t. But the reaction of the prisoners has confirmed that music will play the role of catalyst in their transformation” Sonam said while minimizing their show.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe second part of the event was presented by Rachna Yadav, a Kathak dancer along with her group including four accompanying dancers. With energetic performances by the dancers and melodious composition by her team the prisoners were surprised and felt lucky to be a part of this event. Director General Alok Kumar Verma, who has played a pivotal role in accepting the concept of rehabilitation by Legends of India, said that “music affects the minds of the inmates and calms them. The pain of being away from their loved ones is traumatizing. We want to soothe their nerves, calm them”.last_img read more

Transfer of teachers stalled states Education dept in notification

first_imgKolkata: The state School Education department on Friday brought out a notification, stalling the transfer process of teachers both in the primary and secondary level until further notice.”All kinds of teachers’ transfer orders are stopped until further order. No application or cases for transfer of primary or secondary teachers will be entertained until further notice,” the notification stated. “We want to have a clear idea of the transfer of teachers that have taken place in the last few months, before further going for teacher transfer. So, we have stalled it for now,” state Education minister Partha Chatterjee said. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeA senior official of the state School Education department said that instructions in this regard have already been issued to the district inspector (DI) of schools and also to the headmasters of the state schools. It may be mentioned that after the incident at Daribhit High School in North Dinajpur, where two students were killed in a clash that broke out over teacher recruitment, state Education minister Partha Chatterjee had directed all the DIs to submit a report to the department by October 5, stating the student and teacher strength, the infrastructure of the schools under their respective jurisdiction and other details. “The DIs are expected to submit their report by today (Friday). We will examine the vacancies at the schools on the basis of the report. In recent times, there has been a number of teacher transfers. In Daribhit High School, there was no need of Urdu teachers and neither was there any vacancy. But the school was in the process of recruiting a teacher for Urdu, which led to the unfortunate incident,” the official maintained. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe state Education department wants to have a clear picture of the strength of teachers and students, the vacancies, transfers in recent times and other nitty gritties to prevent such incidents in future. It may be mentioned that on September 25, Chatterjee held a meeting with the District Inspectors (DIs) and expressed his displeasure over the decision of shuffling teachers at Daribhit High School in Islampur and reprimanded some of them for their aggressive role in the recruitment or shuffling of teachers.last_img read more

Firhad Hakim visits Skywalk ahead of inauguration by CM

first_imgKolkata: The state Urban and Municipal Affairs minister Firhad Hakim visited Dakshineswar Skywalk on Tuesday.The Skywalk will be inaugurated by Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on November 5. On his visit to the skywalk on Monday, Hakim said: “The wait is going to end and the hope of many is going to get real. The Skywalk will be of great help to people and also clear crowds fast,” Hakim said adding that people no more have to walk on the road to reach the temple. Instead, they can safely take the Skywalk and reach the temple. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeHakim inspected the Skywalk before it gets inaugurated and also spoke to the locals about it. He further said: “Feasibility to construct a Skywalk at Kalighat is being checked upon. The project will be taken up if it is found feasible.” The residents of the locality have congratulated the state government for constructing the Skywalk and its decision to inaugurate it ahead of Kali Puja. During Kali Puja, thousands of devotees visit Dakshineswar and approximately 1.3 crore devotees turn up at the temple in a year. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedIt has come up at a cost of Rs 65 crore and the 340 m long Skywalk that is fitted with four elevators and 12 escalators ensures an easy connectivity to and from the temple. It will help in reducing traffic congestion in the area and pedestrians will no more have to worry about getting stuck due to vehicular movement when they are headed towards the temple or return from the same. There are also staircases that can one avail while using the Skywalk. Interestingly, one can also buy various stuff while on the Skywalk as there are spaces for around 200 shops there. According to the locals, the Skywalk is a landmark architecture and has given a complete new look to the area. People from various countries visit Dakshineswar every year. The Skywalk at Dakshineswar is a gift from the state government to its people ahead of Kali Puja. It is expected that with the construction people no more have to face rush while entering the temple premises on the days of Kali Puja and Diwali.last_img read more

Delhis waste chokes Yamuna of all aquatic life

first_imgIt is not that Yamuna river has no aquatic life at all. Upstream from Wazirabad – before the river enters Delhi – it is home to turtles, different species of fish, crocodiles and an abundance of aquatic plants and phytoplankton. But as it enters Delhi, the river starts to die. Noted ecologist CR Babu, who is helping the Delhi government in developing a riverfront for the Yamuna, says that the river is in fact “ecologically dead” in the 22 km urban stretch – between the Wazirabad and Okhla barrages. “Low levels of dissolved oxygen (DO) and a very high degree of pollution are the reasons that killed the river,” said Babu. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfA retired Delhi University professor, Babu says that sewage from 21 nullahs (drains) flow into the river, polluting it to a level that is enough to kill the components essential for maintaining aquatic life. Agents like phytoplankton are responsible for sustaining the aquatic food web by creating organic compounds from carbon dioxide dissolved in the water. In the urban stretch of Yamuna there are no phytoplankton or zooplankton left; these play an important role in maintaining the aquatic life of any water body. They have vanished,” he said. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveExperts say factors like river-basin degradation, ecological pollution, contaminant effect on ecosystem and ecology, solid and liquid waste pollution and encroachment on riverbed have all combined to kill Yamuna’s aquatic life. The river, which normally flows through the city in the form of a big ‘nullah’ with no water life, is these days flooded because of heavy monsoon rains which may temporarily revive some aquatic life. According to a report of the Central Pollution Control Board, the current level of DO in the river is only around 1 mg/litre, while it should be between 4 to 5 mg/litre to sustain life. “The formation of coliform bacteria is very high due to pollution. It is formed from raw sewage, and the Delhi stretch of Yamuna is no different than a sewer drain. This is a major factor discouraging aquatic life in the river,” said Sushmita Sengupta, Deputy Water Programme Manager at the Centre for Science and Environment. Ammonia levels, which should to be at a maximum level of 1.2 mg/l, also shoot up to 12 mg/l at some points in the city. Research biologist Chaitra Baliga, who has worked extensively on turtles in various parts of the country, says that other than in Delhi, the Yamuna contains rich aquatic life. Besides different species of fish, crocodiles, turtles and mugger crocodiles, even fresh water Gangetic dolphins can be found in some stretches of the river near Hamirpur, in Uttar Pradesh. “Fresh water during the monsoon may dilute some of the river’s pollutants, but that will not have any sustainable effect on aquatic life,” said Baliga, adding that river-bed construction and human interference are equally responsible for the ecological imbalance in the river. Delhi Water Minister, Kapil Mishra said the government was working seriously to clean the river and bring the Yamuna back to life. “The construction of 14 STPs is going on and we will complete it by December 2017. It is our primary focus that after the STPs are made functional, untreated water will not be allowed into the river,” said Mishra.last_img read more