Vardy accepts FA charge

first_img Former BPL player wins appeal LONDON (AP): A British court overturned the rape conviction of former Premier League player Ched Evans yesterday and ordered a new trial. Evans, a former Sheffield United and Wales striker, was in the packed London courtroom with his girlfriend when the verdict was read out by the Court of Appeal. Evans was convicted in April 2012 of raping a 19-year-old woman at a hotel in Rhyl, north Wales. He was released from prison last year after serving half of his five-year sentence. The 27-year-old Evans had always maintained his innocence and took his case to the Criminal Cases Review Commission. Hodgson backs Vardy LONDON (AP): England coach Roy Hodgson backed Jamie Vardy on Wednesday, saying the Leicester striker did not dive in the incident that led to him being sent off last weekend and sympathising with his angry response to the referee. Hodgson’s employer, the English Football Association, charged Vardy with improper conduct over his reaction to the red card in Sunday’s 2-2 draw with West Ham. “I don’t see that as a dive,” Hodgson said. “I think he was unbalanced. I don’t think it was a penalty either, I think he was unbalanced, running at that speed. “I think there was a very slight sort of contact with the defender, who was trying to cover.” Vardy confronted referee Jon Moss, jabbing a finger at the match official while appearing to express his anger at receiving his first red card of the season. “I sympathise with him, I think he was very, very unlucky,” Hodgson said. “But now he has had to swallow the fact that he has been made to leave the field and then, unfortunately, he has reacted like sometimes human beings react. “He hasn’t just said to the ref, ‘Thanks very much, I understand’ and shakes hands and ‘Have a good game’. He has called him a few names, but he is a human being and that can happen.” Vardy seems certain to be in Hodgson’s plans for the European Championship in June and July after leading Leicester’s stunning pursuit of a first-ever top flight title. LEICESTER, England (AP): Leicester striker Jamie Vardy has accepted an English Football Association improper conduct charge over his reaction to being sent off against West Ham. Vardy’s standard one-match ban could now be lengthened, potentially hitting Leicester’s bid for a first Premier League title. The team is five points ahead of Tottenham with four games remaining. Vardy tangled with Angelo Ogbonna before going down in the penalty area early in the second half on Sunday. Vardy angrily confronted referee Jon Moss after receiving his first red card of the season. At the time, Leicester were leading through Vardy’s 22nd goal of the season and went on to draw 2-2. Leicester also tweeted that it accepted an FA charge of failing to control its players after West Ham was awarded a late penalty.last_img read more

Holmwood score big in rural netball

first_imgDESPITE losing most of the players who won the rural ISSA and all-island netball titles a year ago, Holmwood Technical sent a strong message to their rivals with an impressive 62-13 win over Yallahs High in second-round action on Thursday at The Queen’s School.It was the second win for the defending champions, who held a healthy lead in the previous game against Edwin Allen, before it was rained out.Thursday’s victory set up a double for the Manchester-based school as their junior team fought gallantly to turn back a determined Titchfield High 34-27.big wins for Manchester, DenbighAlso, former champions Manchester High and Denbigh High also picked up big wins on the day. Denbigh had the highest tally of the round as their seniors embarrassed Irwin High, 67-3, in their match at St Elizabeth Technical High School (STETHS). Earlier, Denbigh’s junior team, the defending champions, got by Anchovy High, 31-19.Manchester High’s seniors, playing at home, easily got by STETHS, 50-17, and their juniors completed the double with a 34-13 success over Hampton High.Other results (Seniors): Frome Technical 25; Decarteret College 10; Hampton High 24; Aabuthnott Gallimore 20; Petersfield High 33; Anchovy High 4; Glenmuir High 42; York Castle High 7; Charlemont High 42; Montego Bay High 7; Herbert Morrison Technical 37; Old Harbour High 13; Titchfield High 34; Knox College 25; Thompson Town High 45; Buff Bay High 8; Edwin Allen High 55; St Mary High 17.Juniors: Bishop Gibson High 33; Frome Technical 17; Newell High 21; St Hilda’s High 16; Glenmuir High 29; Albert Town High 15; The Manning’s School 14; Mount Alvernia High 14; Guys Hill High 24; Montego Bay High 16; Herbert Morrison Technical 17; Guys Hill High 16; Knox College 32; St Thomas Technical 8; Central High 15; Marymount High 12; Edwin Allen High 16; St Mary High 14.last_img read more

In Your Neighbourhood

first_imgShelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Six-a-side football titleWaterford Primary captured the Institute of Sports (INSPORTS)/Chubby Portmore Primary Football League with a 4-2 penalty kicks win over arch-rivals Naggo Head Primary in an exciting final at the Cedar Grove Sports Complex last Thursday.The keenly contested match watched by a lively crowd went down to the wire as a penalty shoot-out decided the winners after both teams were deadlocked after regulation and extra time. Rochede Rose, Jevin Parkinson, Demario Knight, Josheme Nelson scored the penalties for Waterford.At the end of the match Ian Andrews, the Administrative Director of INSPORTS handed over the championship trophy to Waterford Primary.Portsmouth Primary wins againDefending champions Portsmouth defeated Independence City 18-7 to retain their title in the final of the INSPORTS Portmore Primary School Netball League at the Ascot High School’s court last Monday.Independence City were no match for the champions with centre Sanaca Knight, who was later named the most valuable player during the month-long competition, dominating play from mid-court.In addition to lifting the coveted trophy, Portsmouth were also named the most disciplined team to go along with the dress parade which they won on the opening day of the competition on November 5.Winning coach Sheryl Wignall was named top coach for guiding Portsmouth to victory.Meanwhile, Greater Portmore defeated Naggo Head 15-10 in the play-off for third place, while Independence City received an award for being the most improved team this year.Cedar Grove blank SouthboroughCedar Grove Estate FC blanked Southborough 3-0 to register their first win of the season from two games, as action continued in the York Pharmacy-sponsored Portmore Division Two Football League last Sunday.Chase Singh, Steven Squire and Chrisna Wright scored for Cedar Grove who now have four points. Leaders Braeton United (six points) also had a similar 3-0 win over Daytona. In another game, Cumberland and Racing United drew 2-2. Cedar Grove will next be in action when they host Daytona at their Sports Complex this afternoon at 3 p.m. Tomorrow at the Racing field, Edgewater take on Cumberland at 1 p.m. and at 3 p.m. Racing United tackle Waterford.Dunbeholden drub Watson GroveDunbeholden sent Watson Grove crashing out of the FLOW-sponsored St Catherine FA Lincoln “Happy” Sutherland Senior KO Football Competition with a big 5-0 win at the Dunbeholden field last Saturday.In other games, Marcus Garvey United hammered Travellers 4-0; Christian Pen whipped Hellshire United 4-1; Bodles booted McCook’s Pen 2-0; G.C. Foster clipped Windsor Lion 2-1; Royal Lakes eliminated East Portmore Portals 2-1; Tredegar Park beat Federal United 1-0; Portsmouth defeated Dela Vega City 1-0; Naggo Head nipped Rodwood 1-0 whil, New Raiders advanced 4-2 on penalties over Spanish Town Police Youth Club after a 1-1 regulation and extra-time scoreline.Westchester ‘A’ rich form continuesWestchester ‘A’ went on another goal scoring spree as they trounced Pro Santos B 27-8 in action from the South East St Catherine Netball League last Saturday.Also on Saturday, Express All Stars steam-rolled Passagefort Strikers 22-12; Pro-Santos A edged Progressive Strikers 14-12. In games played last Sunday Westchester ‘A’ battled past Express All Stars 25-20 in a keenly contested game, while, Pro Santos B spanked Passagefort Strikers 25-8.Today’s games: Mega Angels vs Express All Stars; Westchester vs Progressive Strikers and Pro-Santos ‘A’ vs Passagefort Strikers.Tomorrow’s games: Mega Angels vs Westchester; Pro-Santos ‘A’ vs Pro-Santos ‘B’ ; Progressive Strikers vs Express All Stars. The league which is in its first season is a collaborative effort between the Social Development Commission (SDC), and Colin Fagan, the Member of Parliament for South East St Catherine. quarter-finals todayFour quarter-final games in the third annual Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Six-a-side Football Competition will be played today in Waterhouse. The games were scheduled for last weekend but were postponed due to a water-logged field.At 12:30 p.m. Caribbean Palms and Varma Rangers will meet in a 20-minute qualifying play-off game, and the winners will join the six zone winners and Youths United, in the quarter finals. At 1 p.m., Miles play Choppaz; 2 p.m. Trendsetters face Eurotrend; 3 p.m: Darkside play Youths United or Caribbean Palms; and at 4 p.m Varma Rangers or Youths United play Moscow.The semi-finals will be played tomorrow while the final and third place play-off games are tentatively scheduled for next Saturday, December 12.Digicel, for whom Fraser-Pryce is an ambassador, is the title sponsor, while GraceKennedy, Wisynco, through their product Wata, Tank-Weld Metals, Sagicor Bank, and National Commercial Bank Foundation are the other sponsors.Waterford liftslast_img read more

Tony Becca: ICC chairman says no to Big Three

first_img SECRETLY TALKED ABOUT BULLYING Remember, the takeover, as it was reported, was secretly talked about privately for some time before it became public, and when it came out and was met with opposition, the deals followed. The deals included plans for more Test matches and more money for the smaller teams, and two countries, New Zealand and the West Indies, supported the move, while Zimbabwe, South Africa, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan were all against it. The promise of money won the day, with Pakistan, the last join in, saying it was difficult to stand alone. The pieces of silver may not now arrive, and some of the seven may be disappointed, including the West Indies, who gave away their right, the right to have a voice around the table, the right of equality, and the right for which their predecessors had fought for so long and so hard. Maybe the West Indies four-day professional league is not now guaranteed. The “Big Three” takeover, however, may now end up as nothing but a nightmare, or a bad dream, and as an embarrassment to India, England, and Australia, and also the West Indies. Two Wednesdays ago, it was reported by cricinfo.com that Manohar, the present and new chairman of the ICC, the man who is also the new president of Indian cricket, and the man who succeeded N Srinivasan, the former Indian Board president, had criticised “the imbalance of power within cricket’s governing body” because of the constitution revamp last year which gave the boards of India, England, Australia “greater authority and a larger share of the revenue”. That is interesting: an Indian against an Indian, and Manohar could make all the difference, especially as England, one of Srinivasan’s supporters, is now, it is reported, supporting Manohar. Speaking in Dubai a few days ago, Manohar called the revamp “bullying”, while saying that “there were several faults in the ICC that he hopes to rectify during his term as chairman, which ends in June 2016”. The faults include his disagreement with three countries “bullying” the ICC because of his belief that “an institution is bigger than an individual”, his disagreement with the ruling which says that “all the three countries will be automatically represented on all major committees”, and his disagreement with the fact that “all the financial and commercial aspects of the executive committee will be controlled by the representatives of the three countries.” According to Manohar, “You should have the best man, whether he comes from Zimbabwe, or the West Indies, or even from an associate or affiliate to work on a committee, that will protect the interest of the ICC.” Under the new governance structure, while the BCCI president became the chairman of the ICC, the Cricket Australia chairman heads the five-man executive committee, and the England and Wales Cricket Board president continues to head the ICC’s finance and commercial committees. In January 2014, a draft, done by representatives of India, England, and Australia, was presented to the ICC. The draft was a revenue-distribution document and it proposed, among other things, such as the return to the days of colonialism, that India, England, and Australia get a greater share of the ICC’s revenue. The new chairman of the ICC, the new president of the BCCI, and the man who follows the recent president of the BCCI and the chairman of the ICC into office, said that he does not agree with the revenue-sharing formula simply because, “while it is nice to say that India will get 22 per cent of the total revenue of ICC, you cannot make the poor poorer and the rich richer only because you have the clout”. Early last year, people like Eshan Mani of Pakistan, Malcolm Speed and Malcolm Grey of Australia, Saber Hossain Chowdhury of Bangladesh, Ali Bacher of South Africa, Mike Atherton of England, and Clive Lloyd of the West Indies saw the light and spoke out against it, loud and clear. Today, apart from England’s Giles Clarke, it is Shashank Manohar, the president of the all-powerful BCCI and the chairman of ICC himself, and his stance is strongly supported by members of the cricket fraternity, among them, Cricket South Africa, which has expressed “enormous delight”, and Sri Lanka Cricket, which calls Manohar “a sensible man”. The West Indies Cricket Board’s dream of collecting US$10 million from the International Cricket Council (ICC) over the next eight years, starting in January, appears to be over. This is based on the stance of the new president of the ICC, Shashank Manohar, who is also the new president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI). The money was supposed to be payable to the West Indies, New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan for their support of cricket’s “Big Three”, India, England, and Australia, in their move to take over the ICC early last year. In any language, that is a lot of money, and it is a lot of money for doing nothing, except, possibly, for supporting the “Big Three” in their bid for control of the ICC. That figure represents the money for the Test Match Fund promised to the full members of the ICC, with the exception of India, England, and Australia, and it was promised to them for their support in the much-maligned bid. Lest you have forgotten, the aim of the Test Match Fund was “to encourage Test match cricket” outside the “Big Three”. According to the ICC, with all but the “Big Three” suffering loses when they play each other, it was likely that the money would be used to offset these loses. Recently, for example, Sri Lanka lost some $648,000 while hosting the West Indies. In announcing the release of the funds recently, the ICC did not, however, make mention of the terms of usage, or how it would hold the Boards accountable to the objective of encouraging Test cricket. Maybe the ICC did not have to, or did not intend to, if the money was really for the Test Match Fund and was something of an attraction, something like a bribe, to get the seven to vote for the “Big Three”.last_img read more

JFF contracts sent out to Boyz – Burrell

first_imgJamaica Football Federation (JFF) president, Captain Horace Burrell, has disclosed that contracts have been sent out to members of the senior men’s national football squad, thus addressing one of the grievances the Reggae Boyz had at the start of the second round of World Cup Qualifying last month.On the eve of the start of Jamaica’s second-round World Cup campaign on Friday, November 13, the country’s players had reportedly become restive about unresolved contract issues. An agreement in principle was reached at the eleventh hour and Jamaica played the match, which they lost 0-2 in a lacklustre performance.Burrell expressed hope that the matter has now been put to rest.”Contracts have gone out to our players and those contracts are expected to be signed at the soonest, so we certainly hope that the next time around we will not have the kind of problems we faced the last time around,” the president said.”We need funds for taking care of airfare for our players. I recall the general secretary telling me that the last bill, over the last three months, we have spent just over J$30 million on airfares alone for players,” Captain Burrell said.It is estimated that the JFF will need close to J$ 1 billion to finance its World Cup campaign to Russia in 2018. Burrell revealed that the harsh economic time the country has been enduring is largely to blame. Sponsors, he said, have been coming on board, but not in ways that will have a great impact on the funding required for the World Cup campaign.”There are challenges, and we are trying to deal with the challenges,” he said.last_img read more

Windies go four from four in T20 warm-up

first_imgDUBAI (CMC): OPENER Johnson Charles extended his good form while captain Darren Sammy and Ashley Nurse blasted cameos as West Indies completed their unofficial warm-ups with a three-wicket win over English County Warwickshire here yesterday. Chasing a competitive 159 at the Dubai International Stadium, West Indies romped to their target with seven balls to spare, with Charles stroking 48 off 26 balls, Sammy getting 34 off 18 deliveries, and Nurse carving out an unbeaten 25 off just nine balls. The victory ensured West Indies made a clean sweep of the preparation T20 fixtures, after twice beating Zimbabwe in Sharjah last week and also winning the first game against Warwickshire on Friday. Winning the toss and opting to bat, Warwickshire rallied to 157 for five off their 20 overs, with opener Sam Hain top-scoring with 85 off 57 balls, with nine fours and three sixes. Tim Ambrose struck 29 not out from 20 deliveries with two fours and a six, while former international batsman Jonathan Trott chipped in with 28 from 24 balls. West Indies slow bowlers did the damage with leg-spinner Samuel Badree claiming two for 17 and off-spinner Ashley Nurse, two for 28. Warwickshire lost Jonathon Webb for one in the second over with the score on two, but were hauled back into the contest courtesy of a 60-run, second-wicket stand between Hain and Trott. When three wickets fell for 12 runs in the space of two overs, Hain and Ambrose ensured a Warwickshire recovery with a 78-run, fifth-wicket stand off just 44 deliveries. In reply, West Indies flourished thanks to a 49-run first-wicket stand between Charles and Andre Fletcher, who made just six. Both fell in the space of five deliveries in the sixth over, but Marlon Samuels (18) and Dwayne Bravo (13) put on 30 to revive the innings. Bravo’s demise in the 11th over triggered a slide where West Indies lost four wickets for 13 runs in the space of 23 deliveries. Once again, the Caribbean side were bailed out by their pugnacious lower order as Sammy and Nurse dominated the Warwickshire attack in an up-tempo 55-run partnership off 23 balls. Sammy struck four fours and one six, while Nurse gathered three fours and a six. West Indies will fly to Kolkata today for their two official warm-up games of the Twenty20 World Cup against Australia and India.last_img read more

VCB ready to face trials

first_imgDOHA, Qatar:Despite having 17 Olympic and World Championships medals to her name, Veronica Campbell-Brown knows it will be as difficult as ever to make Jamaica’s team to this year’s Rio Games when national trials roll around in June.”Based on my experience, it is always tough to make my team,” Campbell-Brown said. “Jamaica has a lot of great athletes. I expect it to be as tough as always.”Campbell-Brown, who will turn 34 on May 15, says she feels as fresh as ever and, therefore, is not ready to pronounce this as being her last Olympics despite the fact that she will be 38 in 2020 when the next track and field spectacle is slated for.FEELING YOUNG”Actually, I don’t feel a day older. I feel as young and as fresh as ever,” Campbell-Brown said. “So I will just train hard and stay focused as I feel good.”I do not put limits on myself, and I am not closing any doors because I do not know what God has in store for me. So I will just take it season by season, and right now I am focused on the 2016 season.”The former Vere Technical High student, one of the greatest female sprinters of all time, is the first to admit that last season was not one of her best. She did recover, however, to take bronze in the 200m at the World Championships and helped Jamaica to gold in the 4x100m.”I do expect things to be better and to move smoother than last year. Preparations have been going well. I am excited about the season.”Campbell-Brown, who has a personal best of 10.76 seconds in the 100m and 21.74 in the 200m, was unwilling to say how fast she is likely to go this season.”You never know. I don’t know. We will see,” Campbell-Brown said when asked how fast she believed she would go this season. “I am just focusing on making the team to Rio and then go from there.”ryon.jones@gleanerjm.comlast_img read more

Tony Becca | Cricket needs an overhaul

first_imgOh, for something like India’s Supreme Court. Ever since the West Indies Cricket Board of Control was formed in June 1927, West Indies cricket has been considered the most important thing in the region. It has been said, by numerous people – by politicians, by influential people, and mostly by the man in the street – that cricket is the link between the territories, between the islands, and that it is the force that keeps the West Indian islands and their people together, that binds them all together. It is considered even a greater force of togetherness than the University of the West Indies, which was formed in 1948 by 18 countries in the region for the “higher education” of the people with the “aim of unlocking the potential for the economic and cultural growth”. The West Indies Cricket Board was formed mainly because each island was not strong enough to take on neither England nor Australia and they needed to come together and form one team, to select that team, and in the age of colonialism, that was important. Simply put, Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad, or British Guiana could not compete in Test cricket. Alone, each was not good enough. To play England as one team, to beat England, the colonial masters, was the ambition of every West Indian, and when the team did beat them, it was everlasting joy all over and outside the West Indies. Cricket, therefore, took on an importance of no ordinary meaning. The cricketers were stars, the administrators were successful and well – respected people in the society, and because of all that, cricket was almost a law unto itself. Anything cricket wanted, from anywhere, and probably regardless of who or what suffered, cricket got, and all because of the wishes of the people. At the height of the West Indies’ success at cricket, people talked about Caribbean unity and the spirit of the Caribbean people. It was, to almost everyone, all for one and one for all. In the days of glory, it did not matter who played on the team, be it nine Barbadians, black or white, or seven Jamaicans, black or white, etcetera, etcetera, or whether a “small islander” was in the team. In today’s disappointing days, however, it matters a great deal who plays – black, white, or Indian – whether, for instance, they are from Barbados or from the Windward Islands, and the team is stripped to the bone each time it is announced, and especially each time it is beaten. Everything seems to have gone wrong in the Caribbean, but nothing has changed, except for the captains, the players, the coaches, and the selectors. Cricket, it is said by many, is still the heart-beat of the Caribbean, and to most of the territories, it still remains so. Why then has cricket continued to be the most important sport in the region, or there about, and yet it is allowed to be used by the few, to be controlled, totally controlled, by one man, or by a few men. True, the president, and the board members are voted into office by members of the fraternity, but for an association that consists of six-member boards, and when only 12 persons, two from each member board, are allowed to cast a vote, something must be wrong, or could be wrong, with such a system. One does not need to be a genius to see what can happen in such a situation. The board members are answerable to no one, and so is the president. If the president, by whatever means, manages to control seven votes, he is in, and he is in for as long as he wants. Whether he does a good job, or whether the people feel that he has done a good job, it does not matter. There is nothing above the board member to which they are answerable. They are a law unto themselves, once they control the limited number of votes. Some time ago, the Jamaica Cricket Association’s executive voted unanimously not to support the West Indies board president’s bid for a second term in office. But he was a Jamaican, and some members of the executive and members of the association saw it as such, and they called a special general meeting at which the association voted overwhelmingly to over-turn the executive committee’s vote. The reason for doing so, it was said, was that the president was a Jamaican. In the final analysis, the law of the land is supposed to protect the people of the land, especially for something as important as cricket to the people of the land. The West Indies, however, is a region in which 12 sovereign countries, with 12 different constitutions, among other things, form six-member boards, and it is simply not so. There is not a single entity to deal with what is supposed to be a common problem for the people, and any attempt to try and solve it by one of the entities that make up West Indies cricket would lead to destruction of that entity. It would lead to all sorts of mayhem, and insularity would show its ugly head. There is something called “CARICOM”, however, but that is nothing more than just a figure head, or something like that. “CARICOM” is a sort of federation. It has tried to act. It has talked a lot, but nothing has ever come from all the talk. And the board knows this, and that is why it virtually ignores anything “CARICOM” tries to do. West Indies cricket needs help, and it needs help quickly. Oh, for something like the Indian Supreme Court. Although it does not sound right, and although it happens in places like Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and in Pakistan, where the governments are deeply involved in sports, it is needed in the West Indies, or something like it. West Indies cricket needs something to look after its interest and the interest of the people. In India, cricket is part of the people’s business. Cricket is big. Cricket means money and money means cricket, and the Indian Premier League is based in India. In India, cricket is protected by the laws of the land, and the Supreme Court in India has been called upon to rule on things such as conflict of interest, corruption, and other things in the interest of the people. It has removed men from office, it has stopped men getting into office, and it is now about to rule on the members of the BCCI, the Board of Control for Cricket in India, following the board’s refusal to make certain changes to cricket in India as recommended by the Lotha Committee. The Supreme Court of India checked with the International Cricket Council, the ICC, to find out if it would be interfering with cricket in India before it moved to protect cricket in India and the people of India. The ICC said no. The BCCI was not interfering with cricket, not according to its rules, which refer to government interference in sport. In India, cricket is truly for the people of India, and India is looking out for its people. It is time the West Indies, or CARICOM, do something for its people. The West Indies Cricket Board, as big as it is, must be answerable to someone.last_img read more

Russell’s Thunder Suffers Second Straight Loss

first_imgSYDNEY, Australia (CMC): West Indies leg-spinner Samuel Badree grabbed a brace of wickets as his Brisbane Heat sent Andre Russell’s Sydney Thunder to their third straight loss of the Big Bash League yesterday. Playing at the Sydney Showground Stadium, Thunder were held to 157 for seven off their 20 overs and then watched as Heat sped to their target with two balls remaining. Thunder, the reigning champions, are one from bottom of the table without a point from three outings, while Heat sit on top the standings with two wins from as many games. Sent in, Thunder were propelled by Englishman Eoin Morgan’s top score of 52 from 43 balls, while opener Kurtis Patterson got 36 from 31 deliveries. The pair put on 48 for the third wicket to pull Thunder around from 13 for two in the fourth over. Russell helped add 30 for the fourth wicket with Morgan before he was fourth out for eight in the 15th over, holing out in the deep off pacer Ben Cutting. Badree, who shared the new ball, was brilliant in picking two for 20 from his four overs. He accounted for Morgan in the 17th over, claiming the left-hander to a catch at deep mid-wicket. In reply, Heat were carried by Chris Lynn’s unbeaten 85 from 48 balls, which contained 10 fours and three sixes. Russell finished wicket-less from 3.4 overs, which went for 25 runs.last_img read more

Tough routine wins Capellan another gymnastics gold

first_imgMarcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ “I did a lot of power tumblings,” said Capellan of his multiple somersaults that thrilled the judges at Malaysia International Trade and Exhibition Center Hall 6.“I have that routine in my mind and I know exactly what to do,” said the 23-year-old Capellan, who retained the crown he won two years go in Singapore.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’Reyland Capellan celebrates his gold medal win in Gymnastics in the 2017 SEA Games. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/SEA GAMES POOLThe Masbate native said he was feeling nervous at the start of the competition, because “everybody is doing well, they are all good.”But Capellan, who competed in the World Championships in Glasgow in 2015, went for jumps that carried high levels of difficulty. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:11SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)08:07Athletes treated to a spectacle as SEA Games 2019 officially ends06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold05:02SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball05:21Drama in karate: Tsukii ‘very sad’ over coach’s bullying, cold shoulder03:24PH’s James Palicte boxing light welterweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) SEA Games: Bata, dela Cruz bow out in English billiards 2 nabbed in Bicol drug stings National Historical team rescues Amorsolos, artifacts from Taal LATEST STORIES KUALA LUMPUR — Reyland Capellan has been practicing the same routine every day for the past two years.And when it mattered the most, practice made perfect. His routine, highlighted by a lot of high-score power jumps, won him the 29th Southeast Asian Games men’s artistic gymnastics floor exercise gold medal Tuesday.ADVERTISEMENT OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Teen gunned down in Masbate Albay to send off disaster response team to Batangas Reyland Capellan competes in the men’s floor exercise event of the gymnastics competition of the 29th Southeast Asian Games Tuesday at the MATRADE Exhibition and Convention Centre in Kuala Lumpur. Capelan scored 13.950 points to win the gold medal. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/SEA GAMES POOLHe totaled 13.950 points, enough to beat host Malaysia’s Zul Bahrin Bin Mat Asri (13.750) and Thailand’s Tikumporn Surintornta (13.600). The Philippines’ other entry in the final, 18-year-old novice John Matthew Vergara, finished eighth.“I’m very proud of what I did, because I trained very hard, but before the competition I was very very nervous,” said Capellan who will still compete in vault on Wednesday.Already he is thinking of his training for the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. “We are forming a team for the Olympic training,” he said.His coach Aldrin Castaneda said Capellan and Vergara are being groomed to form that training team.ADVERTISEMENT 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Vilma Santos, Luis Manzano warn public of fake account posing as her Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano View commentslast_img read more